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Belesarius

The "Today in Military History." Thread.

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This is for posting interesting Historical photos/art/articles about the particular day you are posting. Example, on December 7, Pearl Harbor attack related stuff would probably get posted.  14th of October, maybe an image of the battle of Hastings.  With the broad perspectives on the board, I'm hoping to see and learn some interesting stuff over time.

 

 

12376010_10153891190322074_8534345984667

 

 

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No breaks for the holidays in the middle of a World War.

 

"There was no rest for the holiday season in the midst of World War II as the assembly line at Vought-Sikorsky kept turning out F4U Corsairs. This photograph was taken on December 23, 1942, seventy-three years ago today."

 

12376804_10156363352680174_8152827277674

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No breaks for the holidays in the middle of a World War.

 

"There was no rest for the holiday season in the midst of World War II as the assembly line at Vought-Sikorsky kept turning out F4U Corsairs. This photograph was taken on December 23, 1942, seventy-three years ago today."

 

12376804_10156363352680174_8152827277674

This image appears to have caught the change from F4U-1, to F4U-1A, though the A designation was never official, the birds designated as -1As have the same features, the raised seat, semi bubble canopy (as seen on the second Corsair above) with one support on each side, the cowl flaps at the top of the motor pinned closed, the raised tail wheel, and adjusted shocks on the main gear. 

 

Edit: None appear to have the modified cowl, and you can't see the other things, and the image is blury, but maybe. 

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Fuck Jeeps, you like Corsairs, too? We're either gonna have to get married or star in a buddy cop movie together.

 

I love it so much I wrote a short story that turned into a novel, I someday still hope to publish. 

 

Also this is a thing I made from the foldouts inside "The Great Book of WWII Airplanes", from when I was a kid. The book had fallen apart, so I made this, and it was framed, so the tape was harder to see, but it broke moving years ago. 

 

20151223_222127_zpsdr7ijdlt.jpg

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1024px-Washington_Crossing_the_Delaware_

 

 

On this day - or night rather - of December 25-26, 1776, General Washington and remnants of his Continental Army crossed the Delaware in a surprise attack against Hessian mercenaries in the town of Trenton. Thus proving once again that Germans cannot into Winter fighting or military Intel. According to legend, the commander of the Hessian forces, Colonel Johann Rall, was given warning of the Continental attack but instead pocketed the letter in order to keep on drinking.

 

This victory was instrumental in cementing Washington's role as the first Wehraboo-beast hunter in US history.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Trenton

 

STRONK!

 

Battle_of_Trenton_by_Charles_McBarron.jp

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December 26, 1943 the battle of North Cape occurred off of Norway.  The British Fleet sinks the Scharnhorst. 

 

330px-Battle_of_North_Cape_26_December_1

 

 

"Wracked with hits and unable to flee, Scharnhorst finally capsized and sank at 19:45 on 26 December, her propellers still turning, at an estimated position of 72°16′N 28°41′E."

 

Kriegsmarine-Scharnhorst-class-battlecru

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On December 26, 1972 SAC launched 120 B-52s to strike Haiphong and Hanoi.  This was apparently the largest strike that SAC ever launched.

 

"On 26 December 120 bombers lifted off to strike Thái Nguyên, the Kinh No complex, the Duc Noi, Hanoi, and Haiphong Railroads, and a vehicle storage area at Văn Điển. 78 of the bombers took off from Andersen AFB in one time block, the largest single combat launch in SAC history, while 42 others came in from Thailand.The bombers were supported by 113 tactical aircraft which provided chaff corridors, escort fighters, Wild Weasel SAM suppression, and electronic countermeasures support."

 

Did not know that the Linebacker II strikes were some of the biggest that SAC ever did before today.

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Gah, I missed yesterday.  :(

 

Anyhow...

 

December 28, 1990, USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) and USS America (CV 66) Carrier Battle Groups deploy from Norfolk, Va., for the Middle East to join Operation Desert Shield.

 

026664.jpg

 

026663.jpg

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On December 29, 1812, the frigate Constitution, commanded by William Bainbridge, captures HMS Java off Brazil. The defeat of Java, the second frigate lost to Constitution in six months, motivates a change in the tactics of the Royal Navy. No longer are their frigates to engage American frigates like Constitution alone. Only British ships-of-the-line or squadrons are permitted to come close enough to these ships to attack.

USS_Constitution_underway,_August_19,_20

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January 3, 1944 in History Pappy Boyinton was shot down. He was later captured by a Japanese submarine.

 

From Wiki:

 

"On January 3, 1944, he tied World War I ace Eddie Rickenbacker's record of 26 enemy planes destroyed, before he was himself shot down.[9][4][10] On that mission, forty-eight American fighters, including four planes from the Black Sheep Squadron, were sent on a sweep over Rabaul. Boyington was tactical commander of the flight and arrived over the target at eight o'clock AM. He was seen to shoot down his 26th plane, but he then became mixed in the general melee of dogfighting planes and was not seen or heard from during the battle, nor did he return with his squadron. Boyington's wingman, Captain George Ashmun, was killed in action.[1] In later years, Masajiro "Mike" Kawato claimed to have been the pilot who shot down Boyington. He described the combat in two books and numerous public appearances (often with Boyington), but this claim was eventually "disproven," though Kawato repeated his story until his death. Kawato was present during the action in which Boyington was shot down, as one of 70 Japanese fighters which engaged about 30 American fighters."

 

270px-Pappy_Boyington.jpg

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January 3, 1944 in History Pappy Boyinton was shot down. He was later captured by a Japanese submarine.

 

From Wiki:

 

"On January 3, 1944, he tied World War I ace Eddie Rickenbacker's record of 26 enemy planes destroyed, before he was himself shot down.[9][4][10] On that mission, forty-eight American fighters, including four planes from the Black Sheep Squadron, were sent on a sweep over Rabaul. Boyington was tactical commander of the flight and arrived over the target at eight o'clock AM. He was seen to shoot down his 26th plane, but he then became mixed in the general melee of dogfighting planes and was not seen or heard from during the battle, nor did he return with his squadron. Boyington's wingman, Captain George Ashmun, was killed in action.[1] In later years, Masajiro "Mike" Kawato claimed to have been the pilot who shot down Boyington. He described the combat in two books and numerous public appearances (often with Boyington), but this claim was eventually "disproven," though Kawato repeated his story until his death. Kawato was present during the action in which Boyington was shot down, as one of 70 Japanese fighters which engaged about 30 American fighters."

 

270px-Pappy_Boyington.jpg

 

 

Yeah except he lied about his kills in China, making Marion Carl the real Marine top Ace. Bet you've never heard of him. 

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I'm a bit of a Marine Aviation nut at times, so I've heard of Marion Carl before.

 

Anyhow,

 

On January 4, 1847 Samuel Colt sold his first his first revolver pistol to the United States government. Captain Samuel Walker of the Texas Rangers had used earlier Colt Revolvers in use in the Seminole War.  Walker wanted to order Colt revolvers for use by the Rangers in the Mexican-American War. and traveled to New York City in search of Colt. He met Colt in a gunsmith's shop on January 4, 1847, and placed an order for 1,000 revolvers.

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I'm a bit of a Marine Aviation nut at times, so I've heard of Marion Carl before.

 

Anyhow,

 

On January 4, 1847 Samuel Colt sold his first his first revolver pistol to the United States government. Captain Samuel Walker of the Texas Rangers had used earlier Colt Revolvers in use in the Seminole War.  Walker wanted to order Colt revolvers for use by the Rangers in the Mexican-American War. and traveled to New York City in search of Colt. He met Colt in a gunsmith's shop on January 4, 1847, and placed an order for 1,000 revolvers.

 

One of the propaganda bits was that a Texas Ranger was worth 15 Mexicans because he was armed with a pair of Samuel Colt revolvers, a pair of saddle pistols (usually big bore single-shot affairs) and his rifle (either a Kentucky or Hawkins).

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January 4th, 1951

 

Third Battle of Seoul: Today is the day China and the DPRK captured Seoul, however, they kept up an exhaustive, almost nonstop pace to the south for so long this would ultimately be the starting point for South Korea and their UN backers to finally start regaining the initiative and push back.

 

 

 

And not really a war, but more of a historical piece of one, today is also the same day the Samuel Colt sold his first revolver to the US Government in 1847.

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