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Sturgeon's House

Miroslav

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Everything posted by Miroslav

  1. They still do. Dont mind making money off of them though. I do think its very cheesy, and if I was a czech gun maker I would not make a gun with the hammer and sickle on it.
  2. So B&T are expanding the usw concept to include a stocked polymer frame for the sig mhs pistol. It's peculiar that they are doing it without the fixes optic mount. I had the chance to talk to an aimpoint engineer last year and I (foolishly perhaps) expressed my scepticism towards the usw, for which aimpoint developed a special micro red dot. Does anyone know what kind of sales the usw have made? It wouldn't surprise me if this new product sells better than the original, not least because of the price.
  3. Do you know what's up with the B&T USW? It's a cz75 based pistol with a stock adapter and an specially designed small aimpoint sight. The selling point is that regular police officers can carry it in a holster and, by using the extremely minimal shoulder stock and sight, having a weapon with greatly increased range and accuracy (compared to a regular cz75 shot by a police officer with the regular amount of marksmanship training). This is supposedly going to be a big seller as police adapts to the increased terrorist threat. Personally, I think it might be a tough sell. The gun is less comfortable to carry than a polymer wonder nine and I'd very much prefer almost any real rifle to this thing, if I was going up against a bunch of crazy people with AK's. Does anyone know if they're selling any? I think I read on tfb that some Swiss border guard like agency are using them.
  4. Well, if they put the recoil spring around the rod and mounted the rod in line with the bore, then the G3 wouldn't have the hump. If you let the recoil spring and the rear of the bolt carrier group recoil into the stock then I'm quite sure you could fit it in there without having to draft orangutans. Of course, then you wouldn't have any paratrooper variations of your rifle.
  5. I watched the Forgotten Weapons Gerat06 video again the other day, and I started thinking about that rod sticking out from the bolt carrier. How come the CETME and HK rifles have the rod on top and pointing forwards, instead of rearwards? I don't think they would have had a problem fitting a recoil spring behind the bolt carrier group either way. http://s33.postimg.org/7zaibaljj/RDBB.jpg Do you think it could have anything to do with the fact that they really wanted that charging handle manual of arms? By putting the rod forwards, you get this nice cylindrical channel where you can put your charging handle, which makes your big rifle works just like the submachinegun you're already used to. I like this explanation, because it seems reasonable that a design to replace the obsolete bolt action rifles to work alongside not-yet-obsolete 9 mm submachineguns would be designed to have ergonomics matching the submachineguns, to reduce training time for ww3. If I'm not mistaken, quite a few WW2 era SMG's are reloaded by 1) locking bolt open manually 2) inserting magazine 3) letting bolt forward. The G3 is reloaded the same way. Note that this is one more operation than for example an m1 thompson, m1 carbine, stg 44, ak or other no bolt hold open firearms with detachable magazines. I haven't tried but I don't think you're supposed to load a G3 with the bolt closed. Correct me if I'm wrong. On the other hand, it seems weird that they would value quick and easy reloads so lowly that they didn't just ditch the old manual of arms and made their rifle easier to manipulate (adding, for example, a bolt hold open, which would go well with magazines that are really hard to insert when fully loaded). That rifle could have a 9 mm SMG to go with it, using the same simple manual of arms. Unless there's some benefit with the extra weight of the taller receiver and charging handle assembly, the design of the CETME/g3 seems a little weird, considering where it came from.
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