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N-L-M

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  1. Tank You
    N-L-M got a reaction from LostCosmonaut in Competition: Californium 2250   
    0.45m.
  2. Metal
    N-L-M reacted to LoooSeR in The Soviet Tank Thread: Transversely Mounted 1000hp Engines   
    Heh, GL-ATGMs are not enough for us. 57 mm autocannons with guided projectiles, haha.
     
  3. Tank You
    N-L-M reacted to Collimatrix in The Future of PC Gaming Hardware: View from 2019   
    What a Long, Strange Trip it's Been
     
    PC gaming has been a hell of a ride.  I say "has been" both in the sense that exciting and dynamic things have happened, but also in the sense that the most exciting and dynamic times are behind us.  No other form of video gaming is as closely tied to the latest developments in personal computing hardware, and current trends do not suggest that anything dramatically new and exciting is immediately around the corner.  Indeed, fundamental aspects of semiconductor physics suggest that chip technology is nearing, or perhaps already on a plateau where only slow, incremental improvement is possible.  This, in turn, will limit the amount of improvement possible for game developers.  Gaming certainly will not disappear, and PC gaming will also not disappear, although the PC gaming share of the market may contract in the future.  But I think it is a reasonable expectation that future PC game titles will not be such dramatic technological improvements over older titles as was the case in the past in the near term.  In the long term, current technology and hardware design will eventually be replaced with something entirely different and disruptive, but as always it is difficult, maybe impossible to predict what that replacement will be.
     
    The Good Old Days
     
    The start of the modern, hardware-driven PC gaming culture that we all know and love began with Id Software's early first person shooter titles, most importantly 1993's Doom.
     
    PC gaming was around before Doom, of course, but Doom's combination of cutting edge graphics technology and massive, massive appeal is what really got the ball rolling.

    Doom was phenomenally popular.  There were, at one point, more installs of Doom than there were installs of the Windows operating system.  I don't think there is any subsequent PC title that can claim that.  Furthermore, it was Doom, and its spiritual successor Quake that really defined PC gaming as a genre that pushed the boundaries of what was possible with hardware.
     
    Doom convincingly faked 3D graphics on computers that had approximately the same number-crunching might as a potato.  It also demanded radically more computing power than Wolfenstein 3D, but in those days computing hardware was advancing at such a rate that this wasn't really unreasonable.  This was followed by Quake, which was actually 3D, and demanded so much more of the hardware then available that it quickly became one of the first games to support hardware acceleration.
     
    Id software disintegrated under the stress of the development of Quake, and while many of the original Id team have gone on to do noteworthy things in PC gaming technology, none of it has been earth-shaking the way their work at Id was.  And so, the next important development occurred not with Id's games, but with their successors.
     
    It had become clear, by that point, that there was a strong consumer demand for higher game framerates, but also for better-looking graphics.  In addition to ever-more sophisticated game engines and higher poly-count game models, the next big advance in PC gaming technology was the addition of shaders to the graphics.
     
    Shaders could be used to smooth out the low-poly models of the time, apply lighting effects, and generally make the games look less like spiky ass.  But the important caveat about shaders, from a hardware development perspective, was that shader code ran extremely well in parallel while the rest of the game code ran well in series.  The sort of chip that would quickly do the calculations for the main game, and the sort of chip that would do quickly do calculations for the graphics were therefore very different.  Companies devoted exclusively to making graphics-crunching chips emerged (of these, only Nvidia is left standing), and the stage was set for the heyday of PC gaming hardware evolution from the mid 1990s to the early 2000s.  Initially, there were a great number of hardware acceleration options, and getting everything to work was a bit of an inconsistent mess that only enthusiasts really bothered with, but things rapidly settled down to where we are today.  The important rules of thumb which have, hitherto applied are:

    -The IBM-compatible personal computer is the chosen mount of the Glorious PC Gaming Master Race™. 
    -The two most important pieces of hardware on a gaming PC are the CPU and the GPU, and every year the top of the line CPUs and GPUs will be a little faster than before.
    -Even though, as of the mid 2000s, both gaming consoles and Macs were made of predominantly IBM-compatible hardware, they are not suitable devices for the Glorious PC Gaming Master Race™.  This is because they have artificially-imposed software restrictions that keep them from easily being used the same way as a proper gaming PC.
    -Even though they did not suffer from the same compatibility issues as consoles or Macs, computers with integrated graphics processors are not suitable devices for the Glorious PC Gaming Master Race™.
    -Intel CPUs are the best, and Nvidia GPUs are the best.  AMD is a budget option in both categories.
     
    The Victorious March of Moore's Law
     
    Moore's Law, which is not an actual physical law, but rather an observation about the shrinkage of the physical size of transistors, has held so true for most of the 21st century that it seemed like it was an actual fundamental law of the universe.
     
    The most visible and obvious indication of the continuous improvement in computer hardware was that every year the clock speeds on CPUs got higher.
     

     
    Now, clock speed itself isn't actually particularly indicative of overall CPU performance, since that is a complex interplay of clock speed, instructions per cycle and pipe length.  But at the time, CPU architecture was staying more or less the same, so the increase in CPU clock speeds was a reasonable enough, and very marketing-friendly indicator of how swimmingly things were going.  In 2000, Intel was confident that 10 GHZ chips were about a decade away.
     
    This reliable increase in computing power corresponded with a reliable improvement in game graphics and design year on year.  You can usually look at a game from the 2000s and guess, to within a few years, when it came out because the graphical improvements were that consistent year after year.
     
    The improvement was also rapid.  Compare 2004's Far Cry to 2007's Crysis.
     

     

     
    And so, for a time, game designers and hardware designers marched hand in hand towards ever greater performance.
     
    The End of the Low-Hanging Fruit
     
    But you know how this works, right?  Everyone has seen VH1's Behind the Music.  This next part is where it all comes apart after the explosive success and drugs and groupies, leaving just the drugs.  This next part is where we are right now.
     
    If you look again at the chart of CPU clock speeds, you see that improvement flatlines at about 2005.  This is due to the end of Dennard Scaling.  Until about 2006, reductions in the size of transistors allowed chip engineers to increase clock speeds without worrying about thermal issues, but that isn't the case anymore.  Transistors have become so small that significant amounts of current leakage occur, meaning that clock speeds cannot improve without imposing unrealistic thermal loads on the chips.
     
    Clock speed isn't everything.  The actual muscle of a CPU is a function of several things; the pipeline, the instructions per clock cycle, clock speed, and, after 2005 with the introduction of the Athlon 64X2, the core count.  And, even as clock speed remained the same, these other important metrics did continue to see improvement:



    The catch is that the raw performance of a CPU is, roughly speaking, a multiplicative product of all of these things working together.  If the chip designers can manage a 20% increase in IPC and a 20% increase in clock speed, and some enhancements to pipeline design that amount to a 5% improvement, then they're looking at a 51.2% overall improvement in chip performance.  Roughly.  But if they stop being able to improve one of these factors, then to achieve the same increases in performance, they need to cram in the improvements into just the remaining areas, which is a lot harder than making modest improvements across the board.
     
    Multi-core CPUs arrived to market at around the same time that clock speed increases became impossible.  Adding more cores to the CPU did initially allow for some multiplicative improvements in chip performance, which did buy time for the trend of ever-increasing performance.  The theoretical FLOPS (floating point operations per second) of a chip is a function of its IPC, core count and clock speed.  However, the real-world performance increase provided by multi-core processing is highly dependent on the degree to which the task can be paralleled, and is subject to Amdahl's Law:


    Most games can be only poorly parallelized.  The parallel portion is probably around the 50% mark for everything except graphics, which has can be parallelized excellently.  This means that as soon as CPUs hit 16 cores, there was basically no additional improvement to be had in games from multi-core technology.  That is, unless game designers start to code games specifically for better multi-core performance, but so far this has not happened.  On top of this, adding more cores to a CPU usually imposes a small reduction to clock speed, so the actual point of diminishing returns may occur at a slightly lower core count.
     
    On top of all that, designing new and smaller chip architecture has become harder and harder.  Intel first announced 10nm chip architecture back in September 2017, and showed a timeline with it straddling 2017 and 2018.  2018 has come and gone, and still no 10nm.  Currently Intel is hopeful that they can get 10nm chips to market by the end of 2019.
     
    AMD have had a somewhat easier time of it, announcing a radically different mixed 14nm and 7nm "chiplet" architecture at the end of 2018, and actually brought a 7nm discrete graphics card to market at the beginning of 2019.  However, this new graphics card merely matches NVIDIA's top-of-the-line cards, both in terms of performance and in terms of price.  This is a significant development, since AMD's graphics cards have usually been second-best, or cost-effective mid-range models at best, so for them to have a competitive top-of-the-line model is noteworthy.  But, while CPUs and GPUs are different, it certainly doesn't paint a picture of obvious and overwhelming superiority for the new 7nm process.  The release of AMD's "chiplet" Zen 2 CPUs appears to have been delayed to the middle of 2019, so I suppose we'll find out then.  Additionally, it appears that the next-generation of Playstation will use a version of AMD's upcoming "Navi" GPU, as well as a Zen CPU, and AMD hardware will power the next-generation XBOX as well. 
     
    So AMD is doing quite well servicing the console gaming peasant crowd, at least.  Time will tell whether the unexpected delays faced by their rivals along with the unexpected boost from crypto miners buying literally every fucking GPU known to man will allow them to dominate the hardware market going forward.  Investors seem optimistic, however:


     
    With Intel, they seem less sanguine:



    and with NVIDIA, well...
     

     
    But the bottom line is don't expect miracles.  While it would be enormously satisfying to see Intel and NVIDIA taken down a peg after years of anti-consumer bullshit, the reality is that hardware improvements have fundamentally become difficult.  For the time being, nobody is going to be throwing out their old computers just because they've gotten slow.  As the rate of improvements dwindles, people will start throwing out their old PCs and replacing them only because they've gotten broken.
     
    OK, but What About GPUs?
     
    GPU improvements took longer to slow down than CPU improvements, in large part because GPU workloads can be parallel processed well.  But the slowdown has arrived.
     
    This hasn't stopped the manufacturers of discrete GPUs from trying to innovate, of course.  Not only that; the market is about to become more competitive with Intel announcing their plans for a discrete GPU in the near future.  NVIDIA has pushed their new ray-tracing optimized graphics cards for the past few months as well.  The cryptomining GPU boom has come and gone; GPUs turn out to be better than CPUs at cryptomining, but ASICs beat out GPUs but a lot, so that market is unlikely to be a factor again.  GPUs are still relatively cost-competitive for a variety of machine learning tasks, although long-term these will probably be displaced by custom designed chips like the ones Google is mass-ordering.
     
    Things really do not look rosy for GPU sales.  Every time someone discovers some clever alternative use for GPUs like cryptomining or machine learning, they get displaced after a few years by custom hardware solutions even more fine-tuned to the task.  Highly parallel chips are the future, but there's no reason to think that those highly parallel chips will be traditional GPUs, per se.

    And speaking of which, aren't CPUs getting more parallel, with their ever-increasing core count?  And doesn't AMD's "chiplet" architecture allow wildly differently optimized cores to be stitched together?  So, the CPU of a computer could very easily be made to accommodate capable on-board graphics muscle.  So... why do we even need GPUs in the future?  After all, PCs used to have discrete sound cards and networking cards, and the CPU does all of that now.  The GPU has really been the last hold-out, and will likely be swallowed by the CPU, at least on low and mid range machines in the next few years.
     
    Where to Next?
     
    At the end of 2018, popular YouTube tech channel LinusTechTips released a video about Shadow.  Shadow is a company that is planning to use centrally-located servers to provide cloud-based games streaming.  At the time, the video was received with (understandably) a lot of skepticism, and even Linus doesn't sound all that convinced by Shadow's claims.
     
     
    The technical problems with such a system seem daunting, especially with respect to latency.  This really did seem like an idea that would come and go.  This is not its time; the technology simply isn't good enough.

    And then, just ten days ago, Google announced that they had exactly the same idea:
     
     
    The fact that tech colossus Google is interested changed a lot of people's minds about the idea of cloud gaming.  Is this the way forward?  I am unconvinced.  The latency problems do seem legitimately difficult to overcome, even for Google.  Also, almost everything that Google tries to do that isn't search on Android fails miserably.  Remember Google Glass?  Google Plus?
     
    But I do think that games that are partially cloud-based will have some market share.  Actually, they already do.  I spent a hell of a lot of time playing World of Tanks, and that game calculates all line-of-sight checks and all gunfire server-side.  Most online games do have some things that are calculated server-side, but WoT was an extreme example for the time.  I could easily see future games offloading a greater amount of the computational load to centralized servers vis a vis the player's own PC.
     
    But there are two far greater harbingers of doom for PC gaming than cloud computing.  The first is smart phones and the second is shitty American corporate culture.  Smart phones are set to saturate the world in a way desktop PCs never did.  American games publishers are currently more interested in the profits from gambling-esque game monetization schemes than they are in making games.  Obviously, I don't mean that in a generic anti-capitalist, corporation-bashing hippie way.  I hate hippies.  I fuck hippies for breakfast.  But if you look at even mainstream news outlets on Electronic Arts, it's pretty obvious that the AAA games industry, which had hitherto been part of the engine driving the games/hardware train forward, is badly sick right now.  The only thing that may stop their current sleaziness is government intervention.
     
    So, that brings us to the least important, but most discussion-sparking part of the article; my predictions.  In the next few years, I predict that the most popular game titles will be things like Fortnite or Apex Legends.  They will be monetized on some sort of games-as-service model, and will lean heavily if not entirely on multiplayer modes.  They may incorporate some use of server-side calculation to offload the player PC, but in general they will work on modest PCs because they will only aspire to have decent, readable graphics rather than really pretty ones.  The typical "gaming rig" for this type of game will be a modest and inexpensive desktop or laptop running built-in graphics with no discrete graphics card.  There will continue to be an enthusiast market for games that push the limits, but this market will no longer drive the majority of gaming hardware sales.  If these predictions sound suspiciously similar to those espoused by the Coreteks tech channel, that's because I watched a hell of a lot of his stuff when researching this post, and I find his views generally convincing.
     
    Intel's Foveros 3D chip architecture could bring a surge in CPU performance, but I predict that it will be a one-time surge, followed by the return to relatively slow improvement.  The reason why is that the Foveros architecture allows for truly massive CPU caches, and these could be used to create enormous IPC gains.  But after the initial boon caused by the change in architecture, the same problems that are currently slowing down improvement would be back, the same as before.  It definitely wouldn't be a return to the good old days of Moore's Law.  Even further down the road, a switch to a different semiconducting material such as Gallium Nitride (which is already used in some wireless devices and military electronics) could allow further miniaturization and speed ups where silicon has stalled out.  But those sort of predictions stretch my limited prescience and knowledge of semiconductor physics too far.
     
    If you are interested in this stuff, I recommend diving into Coretek's channel (linked above) as well as Adored TV.
  4. Metal
    N-L-M reacted to Toxn in Competition: Californium 2250   
    So this week I did my usual 'run hard with the first idea that pops into your head' approach. This is what I came up with:
     

    This is Brick junior. It fulfils the objective requirements for firepower and armour protection, and the threshold requirements for specific power (I don't know about the rest yet).
     
    The Brick series of vehicles are all built around the idea of the essential crew (see below) being housed in the hull/turret ring under the hull line. The turret superstructure, in turn, is thinly armoured except for the mantlet, although the addition of lightweight armour panels to the turret periphery can readily increase the protection provided to the gun and its associated equipment. As a result, Brick junior weighs 49 tonnes fully loaded and can run on a stretched T-72 derived suspension (Basically one extra road wheel). The engine is an AVDS-series derived unit running to a rear transmission assembly (again, T-72 derived).
     
    The gun is a 150mm L/45 piece designed primarily to sling HEAT-FS and HE-FS. It also has an emergency supercharge APFSDS round which can penetrate a base-model Norman from the front out to 2000m if needed. The range of HEAT-FS ammunition (steel-coned HEDP,  copper-coned and improved copper-coned tandem charge) means that no practical level of up-armouring will save the existing models of Cascadian tanks.
     
    The gun is fed by an autoloader unit running from an ammunition compartment in the left side of the turret. The compartment holds up to 20 charges and 20 shells, and feeds them to a loading rail in the turret rear. The ammunition compartment can be topped up from a secondary 20+20 compartment left of the driver when the turret is locked forwards. Both compartments have blow-off panels on top. 
     
    The M-model Brick would use a more simple autoloader unit, so it would have to level the gun between shots. The more sophisticated version would be able to follow the gun through most of it's elevation and depression range. The gun itself and elevate/depress 30/-10 degrees. The coax is a 12.7mm piece.
     
    The most unusual feature of the Brick is the armoured pulpit mounted to the rear of the turret superstructure. This acts as a counterweight, and also houses the observer-gunner. Xis job is to observe and operate the rangefinder, freeing up some work from the commander and gunner. This crewmember is, however, not necessary to operate the tank and so only enjoys base levels of protection. A 12.7mm pintle-mounted gun may be provided for particularly trusted observer-gunners to operate.
     
    Brick junior identifies as gender-fluid demisexual polyamorous, and xer preferred greeting  is 'please, oh god no'. 
  5. Tank You
    N-L-M reacted to Xoon in Competition: Californium 2250   
    Taking your idea, I came up with something like this. 

     
    A pressure sensor sits on the accumulator. When the accumulator compresses, it compresses a hydraulic fluid which controls the engine throttle, the more the accumulator is compressed, the less throttle the engine gets. Also, when at the dead bottom, it activates a valve which decouples the prime mover from the pump and locks it hydraulically, while also bypassing it with a check valve. 
     
    I could add a hydraulic/pneumatic PID for more precise control. Also note that the control lines are simplified, and probably will be changed to better reflect their behavior later. 
     
    And thanks, I almost flipped my table when I noticed the missing line. Luckily it is too heavy. 
     
     
    EDIT:
    Updated my schematic with a PID, am wondering if I should use a electric PID instead of a hydraulic. A worry would be lack of pressure could stop the system. 

     
    I think I might need a separate flow chart for the control engineering.  One schematic for the main hydraulics, and one for the control scheme. 
     
    Edit:
    Damn, the spring in the clutch cylinder is on the wrong side. Please ignore. 
  6. Metal
    N-L-M reacted to Sturgeon in Competition: Californium 2250   
    Here's the engine model I'll be going with:
     

     
    That is 3 V-55AM2s stretched out so that their cylinders each have a 1-cylinder sized gap between them, and then the center engine is mounted upside down, and the outer two are mounted right-side up and interleaved with them
    It weighs 3500 kg and produces a net of 2,340 hp.
     
    Current hull cross-section looks like this:


     
     
  7. Metal
    N-L-M reacted to Xoon in Competition: Californium 2250   
    So I have been working on a schematic for my hydrostatic transmission.

     
    In short, its a hydraulic open circuit. A swash plate pump delivers the power to the system.  A over pressure valve makes sure excess pressure and pressure spikes are vented into the reservoir. The power is split by a distributor valve, acting as a sort of differential lock in the case of a track slipping.  The flow is then regulated by a flow valve  that feeds into a direction changer valve. It feeds the hydraulic motor, also a swash plate motor. In parallel, it has a freewheel valve for when you simply want the vehicle to rotate freely. Both feed back into the reservoir.  A accumulator is also hooked into the high pressure side of the system, providing regenerative breaking and smoothing out the power delivered to and from the motors. 
     
    This is just a first draft, I will most likely add more safety features and refine the system. Also it lacks the auxiliary equipment like the suspension.  I am also researching ways of making the pump more efficient past simply running constantly and the excess pressure being vented into the reservoir, wasted. Maybe also making the pump into a starter for the engine.  I also lack the oil cooler. 
     
    I have been pondering on using two engines to power the system, one for each motor, or two pumps. The issue would be that power could not be shared between the motors and same with regenerative breaks. 
     
     
     

     
    I am also working on the hydropneumatic suspension. This is a schematic for the front and rear most road wheels.  Pressure is feed into a 3/4 valve which is used elevate the roadwheel, a over pressure valve is used to regulate the amount it elevates. Outside of that, the pressure is fed though a over pressure valve that regulates the height of the suspension.  Then a accumulator is coupled in parallel to provide the "springyness". Before the hydraulic cylinder is a flow valve, which regulates the amount of flow, that is used to modify the stiffness of the suspension. 
     
    This system is feed by the open circuit shown above in the first picture. 
     
     
    And yes, everything is written in Norwegian, because diversity, a core principle of the most supreme state. 
    And yes, it was all hand written while cutting steel, because I lack proper schematic software. 
     
     
  8. Tank You
    N-L-M got a reaction from Lord_James in Competition: Californium 2250   
    AP caps do not count against the stack limit, no.
     
    Steel long rod penetrators can cope with 2000m/s
     
    Low pressure is anything up to the equivalent of the Cockerill 90mm LP gun.
  9. Metal
    N-L-M got a reaction from DIADES in Competition: Californium 2250   
    The DPRC looks kindly upon your dedication to the cause, comrade!
  10. Tank You
    N-L-M got a reaction from Collimatrix in Competition: Californium 2250   
    This is factually incorrect. You see, the upending moment is also proportional to the length. For a given upending force on an constant-section solid rod, we therefore find that the upending moment scales with rod length (as the moment arm is half the rod length), but so too does the stabilizing moment from a tail of constant size, as its moment arm is also approximately half the rod length!
    And indeed, we find this to be the case:

    The tail surface area of all the above darts is very similar.
  11. Metal
    N-L-M reacted to Lord_James in Competition: Californium 2250   
    Are segmented rods a thing, or maybe put 2 rods end to end like in 3BM-42? 
  12. Funny
    N-L-M reacted to Toxn in Competition: Californium 2250   
    Comes in two threaded pieces with instructions to the crew NOT to thread them together as higher performance may result 
  13. Funny
    N-L-M reacted to Whatismoo in Competition: Californium 2250   
    Four others and I have joined together in the spirit of collective labor to form the SierraNevadaVagonzavod, a collective design bureau. We are currently investigating vehicles under the program designation AFV-50 (Armored Fighting Vehicle 2250).
     
    AFV-50 will be equipped with a powerful smoothbore gun of greater than 100mm bore and over 35 calibers in length. It will be equipped with sufficiently tailored ammunition to auditorily correct the political and moral failings of our northern and western neighbors.
     
    The collective has determined that an automatic loading mechanism will allow all crew personnel to express their individual strengths, political, moral, physical, emotional, spiritual, and otherwise, towards the collective goal most equally. We believe that the performance should far exceed the requirements as posed in the RFP, a feat only achieved through intense study of the works of Comrade Hubbard, Praise be upon them, may their everlasting name be sung eternally from the peoples’ lips, and signed from their hands.
     
    Always on our guard, the Shock-Workers of the SNVZ have designed an armoring scheme which will be equipped to resist all potential and future threats to our peaceful way of existence from all angles. Should the Cascadian Warmongers and their Feudal religious zealot accomplices dare to follow through their bellicose rhetoric, the AFV-50 will be able to resist all aggression, macro and micro, from all current and prospective threat systems. However! The design collective has always taken to heart the words of Comrade Feinstein the 5th:
     
    The greatest weapon in the arsenal of the DPRC is not our guns or bombs, but L Ron Hubbard Thought.
     
    This is the true armor which protects our people and way of life. It is the design collective’s hope that our armor design may in the balance be worthy of utterance in the same sentence as the name of the Great Prophet Hubbard, Praise be upon them, may their everlasting name be sung eternally from the peoples’ lips, and signed from their hands.
  14. Tank You
    N-L-M reacted to DIADES in Competition: Californium 2250   
    Absolutely,  Recoverability, Continued Fightability demand it.
  15. Tank You
    N-L-M reacted to DIADES in Competition: Californium 2250   
    That is going to need one hell of a traverse drive.  Probably consume more power that required for mobility.  And if the powerpack is in the turret ( the frigging enormous powerpack) then drive to the tracks is hydraulic or electric?  Hydraulic has such poor efficiency that the powerpack would go from frigging enormous to double frigging enormous.  If electric, bear in mind that we don't have fancy electronics so no brushless high efficiency stuff and even brushed stuff will have to use old school magnetic materials - no fancy rare earths..  Then there is CoG height and cross slope stability etc.  But, it would be cool if you can make it work
     
  16. Tank You
    N-L-M reacted to DIADES in Competition: Californium 2250   
    So, where is my design heading?
    1. First pass - working up from the required lethality, making some assumptions around mobility.
    2. Basic config and style chosen - forward turret, rear powerpack
    3. Set turret size - how many crew, where is the ammo etc
    4. What physical size and non-armour mass results
    5 What armour mass is required to get acceptable protection
    6 What is new total mass and size - do prior assumption still work?
    6 Rinse and repeat until time runs out or acceptable outcome.
     
     
  17. Funny
    N-L-M reacted to DIADES in Competition: Californium 2250   
    Remember, the Cascadians are ever trying to use asymmetrical warfare to sow dissent.......
  18. Funny
    N-L-M got a reaction from DIADES in Competition: Californium 2250   
    Because the DPRC's high end AlO production is allocated to aircraft, LAV and personal body armor and not for tanks; the sheer quantity needed for large AFV production exceeds reasonable production capacities.
    At the same time, performance is not expected to reasonably exceed that of fused silica against the reference threats.
    Fused silica is in effect just very pure glass, easy to mass-produce. It has also seen use in armor since the early 1950s; it is assessed as offering similar performance at significantly lower costs vs the existing threats compared to more esoteric solutions such as granite, which is therefore disqualified on cost grounds.
     
    Such Suppressive Personship is the sign of a Reactive Mind. Hatethink like this may get your Operating Thetan clearance revoked and you audited for sedition.
     
    On a more serious note, you're invited to, y'know, actually participate before complaining about the rules.
  19. Tank You
    N-L-M got a reaction from Belesarius in Competition: Californium 2250   
    ...you do realize Toxn was one of the winners of the last competition, right?
     
    Again, you're strongly encouraged to chill and face the fact that A. You were wrong about Chobham and B. You're gonna have to live without advanced ceramics in this competition.
    If you can't cope with B you can freely leave the thread and if you can't cope with A this may be the wrong site for you.
  20. Funny
    N-L-M got a reaction from Zyklon in Competition: Californium 2250   
    Because the DPRC's high end AlO production is allocated to aircraft, LAV and personal body armor and not for tanks; the sheer quantity needed for large AFV production exceeds reasonable production capacities.
    At the same time, performance is not expected to reasonably exceed that of fused silica against the reference threats.
    Fused silica is in effect just very pure glass, easy to mass-produce. It has also seen use in armor since the early 1950s; it is assessed as offering similar performance at significantly lower costs vs the existing threats compared to more esoteric solutions such as granite, which is therefore disqualified on cost grounds.
     
    Such Suppressive Personship is the sign of a Reactive Mind. Hatethink like this may get your Operating Thetan clearance revoked and you audited for sedition.
     
    On a more serious note, you're invited to, y'know, actually participate before complaining about the rules.
  21. Tank You
    N-L-M got a reaction from That_Baka in Competition: Californium 2250   
    NERA is reactive not passive.
    NERA plates holed by the precursor do not stop the primary.
  22. Funny
    N-L-M got a reaction from That_Baka in Competition: Californium 2250   
    Because the DPRC's high end AlO production is allocated to aircraft, LAV and personal body armor and not for tanks; the sheer quantity needed for large AFV production exceeds reasonable production capacities.
    At the same time, performance is not expected to reasonably exceed that of fused silica against the reference threats.
    Fused silica is in effect just very pure glass, easy to mass-produce. It has also seen use in armor since the early 1950s; it is assessed as offering similar performance at significantly lower costs vs the existing threats compared to more esoteric solutions such as granite, which is therefore disqualified on cost grounds.
     
    Such Suppressive Personship is the sign of a Reactive Mind. Hatethink like this may get your Operating Thetan clearance revoked and you audited for sedition.
     
    On a more serious note, you're invited to, y'know, actually participate before complaining about the rules.
  23. Funny
    N-L-M reacted to Collimatrix in Competition: Californium 2250   
    You're right, my bad.  But with NLM's clarification about only the steel part of the reactive armor array contributing to the K2, then it's actually only about 103mm.
     
    As soon as we know the formula for K1 we can figure out what the highest ratio of cosine(theta)/K1 is.  That should give us the best efficiency.
     
    EDIT:

    for instance, the ratio of the secant of 80 degrees over the secant of 70 degrees is 1.96.  Eyeballing the K1 chart, the effect at those slopes is about 3.5 and 2 respectively.  3.5/2 is only 1.75, so the increase in the effectiveness of the array is not offset by the increase in areal density.
     
     
    EDIT EDIT:  That's the reciprocal of the cosine of the Greek letter theta, not the act of attempting to take out a loan from the Dianetic People's Bank by having your thetan co-sign.
  24. Funny
    N-L-M reacted to Collimatrix in Competition: Californium 2250   
    I can do two better:

    https://patents.google.com/patent/US35600A/en
     
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US3216423A/en
  25. Funny
    N-L-M got a reaction from Collimatrix in Competition: Californium 2250   
    Because the DPRC's high end AlO production is allocated to aircraft, LAV and personal body armor and not for tanks; the sheer quantity needed for large AFV production exceeds reasonable production capacities.
    At the same time, performance is not expected to reasonably exceed that of fused silica against the reference threats.
    Fused silica is in effect just very pure glass, easy to mass-produce. It has also seen use in armor since the early 1950s; it is assessed as offering similar performance at significantly lower costs vs the existing threats compared to more esoteric solutions such as granite, which is therefore disqualified on cost grounds.
     
    Such Suppressive Personship is the sign of a Reactive Mind. Hatethink like this may get your Operating Thetan clearance revoked and you audited for sedition.
     
    On a more serious note, you're invited to, y'know, actually participate before complaining about the rules.
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