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Found 12 results

  1. Well known APC Rosomak in Afgan. version armour: Orginally it was israeli but after that it was produced by polish company "Mikanit": http://www.mikanit.com.pl/produkty/oslony-balistyczne.html Now, we know patent draws and description: Composition: 2 mm HHS + air + 6,7 mm HHS + 5 mm composite + 5 mm composite + 5 mm composite + 3,5 mm HHS + 35 mm air gap + 3,5 mm HHS + 5 mm composite + 5 mm composite + 3,5 mm HHS + 35 mm air gap + 20 mm aluminium + 5 mm aluminium. There is possibility that layout could be 4+3 (composite) and single composite layer can have up to 6mm thick and single HHS layer can have 4mm thickness. Layers can be separate up to 45mm. Accoding to manufacurer this armour can protect against ATGM and RPG's up to 500mm RHA penetration. Whole armour is combat proven in Afganistan - there are known some "Rosomak" whit 3x RPG's hits diretly in to this armour - no penetration at all, no engine damage.
  2. http://www.witu.mil.pl/www/biuletyn/ptu_2020/151/97.pdf The reduction of the armour system mass was estimated to 32-37%due to the use of the innovative grade of steel.
  3. Hello, I'm interested in Soviet armor production and deployment. Especially of T-55 tank and its variants. Sadly, most sources touch this subject very generally while I would want to get a more detailed view. How much tanks were produced in which country and at what year. Were Soviets producing armor for themselves or for export. Any source which would go into bit more detail about it is appreciated. I would appreciate if someone could help me find information required about those tanks as so far I can rely only on quite general information.
  4. I want to calculate the weight required to make an armor that can resist 7.62 RUAG SWISS AP, also known as VPAM level 12. I needed a baseline so I took NIJ Level IV and then tried to find the difference of weight so I could get a percentage. The only plate that's still made for this threat is the TenCate CX-950 IC. This plate is 8.93 lbs for a sapi medium and is alumina in-conjonction with soft armor. I then needed to find a Level IV alumina IC, which I found on UARM's website. It's 7.6 lbs, so if we do 8.93/7.6 we get around 1.175, but I put 1.25 considering UARM's plates are often quite heavy. Now that we have 1.25, we can start applying it to silicon carbide and boron carbide. Denmark's group has a level IV silicon carbide plate at 5.95 lbs, so times 1.25 it gives 7.4375. Hesco's boron carbide IV plate is 5.1 lbs, so times 1.25 we get 6.375. Now, I wanted to know what was the weight for hardened steel. I took MARS 600, which is one of the best armor steel you can get. Using this page, I can easily calculate that you would need about 19mm to stop it. Using a calculator, we know that a full inch sapi medium plate would weight 33.9 lbs. 19mm/25.4mm = 0.748 inch so if we do 0.748*33.9 we get 25.3572 lbs. The problem is obvious : How is boron carbide 4 times as light as steel? Silicon carbide is 3.4 times as light too? It doesn't make any sense, giving that they are both around 2.2 ME and hardened steel is 1.3 ME, so it should be around 1.7 times heavier for steel. What did I get wrong?
  5. "Special armor?" It's all fucking NERA. Some models of T-72 had it. Merk IV's have it. Abramses have it.
  6. Do you like pontificating on the infantryman's load? Want to see how different gear choices affect said load? If so, check out this spreadsheet including an itemized list of "best of breed" (IMHO) gear! Download it and customize to suit your own preferred equipment. The "Configured Totals" section should auto-calculate weights and ammunition totals for your selected items, and you can copy and paste "Configured Totals" values into the light and heavy load sections for comparison. I've tried to provide a fairly comprehensive list of gear for the rifle squad and machine gun teams. A few items are notional, and those should be noted as such. I've also tried to balance both lightness and capability. I, however, mostly intend this spreadsheet to serve as an outline and handy way to calculate total values for any items you choose to add or change. While I'm sure there are a more than a few errors, this spreadsheet is merely intended as a starting point for your own explorations, and I am NOT likely to maintain this particular version. Enjoy! Infantry Packlist Spreadsheet
  7. Hey y'all, long time no see. I Thought I understood the premise of perforated armor, but earlier today I realized I probably don't. I thought perforated armor was just supposed to damage/decelerate a projectile as it passed through, but then I realized that I thought that's what spaced armor is for, so what's the difference. I also realized I may not really know what perforated armor is at all. I realized that I simultaneously associate two fairly different images with perforated armor. I imagine this as just breaking small projectiles as they hit it. But then there's this which appears to have slots all throughout it, which is more of what I think of when I think of something being perforated, but this doesn't look like it really serves the same purpose, nor do I have any idea what purpose this does serve now that I think about it. So what am I missing about perforated armor(and whatever one of these things is if not perforated armor)?
  8. Hi guys, I recently read about upgrade packages to old tanks like the M-60 and T-55, but kept seeing comments from people saying they would still be obsolete. Is this because the M-60 and T-55 are made entirely of steel (and not composite) armor? I have this theory that thick steel armor is probably totally obsolete, and is just dead weight in the age of lighter weight composite armor. You can bolt on upgrades to an M-60 or T-55, but you're still hamstrung by the fact that either tank will be carrying around tons of useless steel. Am I right? Also, if we wanted to upgrade old tanks like that, wouldn't the best idea be to develop a new turret--with lighter, modern composite armor and better technology inside--and just drop it into the old tanks? The hulls would still be made of heavy steel, but that could be helped a bit by adding applique armor. Here are some of the upgrades I read about: https://youtu.be/NG89Zh9qQrQ http://www.army-guide.com/eng/product1907.html
  9. hello everyone! so i read that the T-90 shares the T-72B turret , thus BDD armor , however this documentary (?) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lKGv5JQBTI8 says "aluminums and plastics". is this any legit? did they like , keep the t72b cavity design and change the fill? also , did the combination on new welded towers change?
  10. Most historical arms and armor were made of metal, leather and stone. This is the thread for historical weapons and armor made of weird shit. This is an example of armor made from the Gilbert islands made of thick, woven coconut fiber. The helmet is made from a pufferfish. I've seen a set similar to this in another museum. The woven fiber body armor looked like it would be reasonably effective. Coconut husk is pretty tough and the vest was very thick. I wasn't so sure about the helmet. The Gilbertese were also the foremost users of shark's tooth weapons, although other Polynesians used them as well: Several historical examples I've seen are these strange, branching designs: Polynesians were not the only ones to use teeth in their arms. The Mycenian Greeks made helmets out of boars teeth. One such helmet is described in the Iliad, and there are a few archeological discoveries of such: And finally, a club used by Inuits made from the penis-bone of a walrus:
  11. This is wonderful. I learned: 1) The leo 1 had poor hull armor, but excellent turret armor! 2) Chieftain's armor was 16 inches thick! 4) The T-64 was the Soviet's own version of the leopard(?!) Actually, the materials science stuff seems solid, and jives with what I've heard before (but how much of that is people repeating this article?).
  12. I seem to recall hearing somewhere that sloping actually increases effective armor more than line of sight thickness, due to yaw effects on the projectile. How is this affected by materials quality, projectile velocity and the like?
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