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General artillery, SPGs, MLRS and long range ATGMs thread.

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   According to the Jane's International Defense Review magazine, in the article Christopher F. Foss, BAE Systems Hägglunds AB (one of the Swedish divisions of BAE Systems corporation) completed the prototype demonstrator of the 120-mm double-barreled self-propelled mortar Mjölner for the Swedish army, on the chassis of the infantry fighting vehicle CV90, and intends to begin testing the system in the near future.

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A little bit unusual thing:

https://bmpd.livejournal.com/2896854.html

 

   South Korean missile complex Bigung

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   It is reported that at the opening of the Seoul International Aerospace & Defense Exhibition 2017 (ADEX-2017), which opens on October 17, 2017 in Seoul, the capital of South Korea, the serial model the South Korean missile complex Bigung will be publicly shown for the first time. Earlier it was reported that at the end of 2017, it was planned to start supplying Bigung missile systems to South Korea marines.

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   The combat vehicle of the complex is a 40-missiles (two 20 missiles launching units) mounted on the automobile chassis (6x6) launcher. Rockets are the 70-mm light guided missile (LOGIR) of the joint US-South Korean development. The LOGIR missile (the South Korean version is designated as K-LOGIR) was developed by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) by the South Korean company LIG Nex1 (part of the LG group) based on the well-known 70-mm unguided rocket Hydra 70, but it is equipped with the so-called Low-Cost Imaging Terminal Seeker (LCITS), created under the auspices of ONR, using imaging infra-red (IIR) imaging technology, with an additional low-cost inertial correction unit at the marching part of trajectory. Thus, the LOGIR rocket implements the "fire and forget" principle. The LOGIR missile is designed to defeat predominantly small-scale and high-speed surface targets - apparently, because of the limited cost requirements of the LCITS GOS, its use for less-contrast ground targets will not be effective enough.

 

   Bigung is essentially a mobile coastal defense system. The main task of the Bigung missile complex is the fight against various combat and landing crafts of the DPRK, and first of all with hovercrafts being built in the DPRK in series.

 

   It is alleged that during the mass production the cost of the K-LOGIR missile will not exceed $ 10 thousand. The missile has a mass of 15 kg and a length of 1.9 m. The range of fire is declared "more than 6 km". Although in fact the LOGIR was developed by the American side, LIG Nex1 has developed and produces an element base for the GOS and other missile systems, which allows to significantly reduce their cost, and will lead a full cycle of the release of these systems.

   The US-South Korean memorandum of understanding on the joint development of the LOGIR missile was signed in March 2007. Since 2010, LIG Nex1 together with the Defense Development Agency (ADD) of the Ministry of Defense of South Korea led the development of the Bigung missile complex. It was reported that in 2016, during tests of the Bigung complex, 20 test rocket launches with good performance were made. As a means of target designation, Bigung's combat machine uses an electron-optical station on a lifting mast.

bigung

 

20110516092541

 

2015072420091641700

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On 3/2/2017 at 12:05 AM, Renegade334 said:

*rolls eyes* Finally.

Now all they have to do is either retrofit the A7 Paladin with a 52-cal tube or perform a major necromancy spell on the XM2001 Crusader and the US Army will actually have a decent SPH that can keep up with its peers.

 

"The M109A7 is in low rate production with mobility improvements that will allow it to keep up with the armoured combat teams, as well as, to allow the next set of improvements focused on the turret and gun. On the later a longer 58 calibre 155mm gun with a 70 km range is the centre piece."

 

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Yeah, it should be a 52-caliber barrel...but given the number of typos and awkward sentence structures in that article, I think we can chalk it up as a mere mistake.

 

Anyway, if they've made good progress on the new gun, I hope they've done the same with that proposed autoloader...watching artillerymen manually (and sloooooowly) chamber rounds in the Paladin can be painful to watch.

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I thought that was the case. At anyway rate it's good to see U.S. Artillery is getting some love. The paladin was really starting to get left in the dust. 

 

Another thing that's been on my mind is I wonder if any technology from the M-SHORAD Bradley could end up on the later IFV varients. In particular the 30mm cannon and a universal missile system. Both of these would give it a pretty substantial firepower boost and added flexibility.

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15 hours ago, JNT11593 said:

I thought that was the case. At anyway rate it's good to see U.S. Artillery is getting some love. The paladin was really starting to get left in the dust. 

 

Another thing that's been on my mind is I wonder if any technology from the M-SHORAD Bradley could end up on the later IFV varients. In particular the 30mm cannon and a universal missile system. Both of these would give it a pretty substantial firepower boost and added flexibility.

 

Retrofitting the new 30mm chain cannon on the Bradley's turret might be more wallet-friendly than swapping the current manned unit for a Kongsberg MCT-30 with a pre-installed XM813, even though the latter combination would improve the vehicle's survivability. Is there any feedback on whether the AFV crews prefer to have a fully unmanned turret, or a manned one where the crew can go topside to surveil the surroundings?

 

As for the missile part, the Bradley is pretty much stuck with TOW, Javelin and Stinger (and each requires a dedicated launcher, unless they come up with a universal container or common launch rail). Hellfire (the radar version, at least) can't be used without those pMHR radars or some forward designator.

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4 hours ago, Renegade334 said:

 

Retrofitting the new 30mm chain cannon on the Bradley's turret might be more wallet-friendly than swapping the current manned unit for a Kongsberg MCT-30 with a pre-installed XM813, even though the latter combination would improve the vehicle's survivability. Is there any feedback on whether the AFV crews prefer to have a fully unmanned turret, or a manned one where the crew can go topside to surveil the surroundings?

 

As for the missile part, the Bradley is pretty much stuck with TOW, Javelin and Stinger (and each requires a dedicated launcher, unless they come up with a universal container or common launch rail). Hellfire (the radar version, at least) can't be used without those pMHR radars or some forward designator.

 

If there has been any feedback my googlefu is to weak to find. I haven't even heard about the Bradley testbed with 30 mm on for about a year or more now. Another thing with the MCT-30 is can it even add an ATGM capability? That's a feature I'd imagine the army wouldn't like to lose unless it absolutely had to.

 

17 minutes ago, Ramlaen said:

Where did the missile supposedly hit, I cannot see an obvious spot in that video.

Possibly demolished like that one in Baiji?

 

Back on the topic of artillery though.

 

h3cnupcl3dtz.jpg

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1 hour ago, JNT11593 said:

 

If there has been any feedback my googlefu is to weak to find. I haven't even heard about the Bradley testbed with 30 mm on for about a year or more now. Another thing with the MCT-30 is can it even add an ATGM capability? That's a feature I'd imagine the army wouldn't like to lose unless it absolutely had to.

 

About the MCT-30: yeah, it can. The vehicle down below is an Indian Tata Motors Kestrel, topped with a Kongsberg Protector MCT-30 and Spike launchers; it's definitely doable though the arrangement looks a bit haphazard.

 

PROTECTOR_MCT-30R_Kongsberg_on_TATA_Moto

 

As for the MCT-30-equipped Bradley, I guess budget constraints are the reason why we aren't hearing much about it. The Stryker Dragoon upgrade was probably deemed more important and must've cannibalized a lot of the Bradley funding (both development and procurement).

 

EDIT: now I can't decide whether those are Spikes or Javelins, since the launchers and their foam covers look so damn similar to each other, especially seen from that angle.

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22 hours ago, Renegade334 said:

 

About the MCT-30: yeah, it can. The vehicle down below is an Indian Tata Motors Kestrel, topped with a Kongsberg Protector MCT-30 and Spike launchers; it's definitely doable though the arrangement looks a bit haphazard.

 

PROTECTOR_MCT-30R_Kongsberg_on_TATA_Moto

 

As for the MCT-30-equipped Bradley, I guess budget constraints are the reason why we aren't hearing much about it. The Stryker Dragoon upgrade was probably deemed more important and must've cannibalized a lot of the Bradley funding (both development and procurement).

 

EDIT: now I can't decide whether those are Spikes or Javelins, since the launchers and their foam covers look so damn similar to each other, especially seen from that angle.

The two ATGMs are identical, and considering the RWS does only mount a javelin, it means the MCT-30 in this picture has two Javelins. 

 

Never heard about the MCT-30 using anything else than Javelins. 

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