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The Small Arms Thread, Part 8: 2018; ICSR to be replaced by US Army with interim 15mm Revolver Cannon.

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Alas the late, great Charlie Kelsey!  His ideas always seemed to make money for someone other than himself.  

https://www.google.com/patents/US5116224

https://www.google.com/patents/US5133261

 

Hmm, after viewing that.....

 

 

Torx bit in 6.68mm is the bullet our troops need for better capability at longer combat ranges.

 

This post suddenly became actually closer to the truth.

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Kalashnikov concern will show some toys on "Army-2015" expo.

New model of the AK-107, newest version of the AK-12, AK-15 carbine, new 9x19 pistol, created with FSB help, and modernisation kit for SVD. Also they will show their other products such as RCWS and small boats for military use.

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Why did they go with bright red handguards? (or did they just add that on tv for some reason?)

 

.....Nevermind, I don't think I want the answer to that question on second thought.

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So, Let's talk Hard Chrome/Nickel Chrome finishes for slides, been looking at this one.

 

http://www.rockyourglock.com/custom/RYG-CHRMSLDBRL.htm

 

No, I don't want to do it for looks, but rather, I do know that Chrome is exceptionally hard, somewhat self lubricating, and wear/scratch resistant if the finish is done properly (that's the part that worries me the most is if its done improperly) and can increase things like part and barrel life, one other big perk is, I live in a place where it's very humid (and next to the sea at that) almost year round so corrosion resistance is also a pretty big plus.

 

Thoughts gentleman? the price for doing both the slide and barrel is very reasonable to me, my biggest concern is "fuck, they did it wrong...now what?"

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Why did they go with bright red handguards? (or did they just add that on tv for some reason?)

 

.....Nevermind, I don't think I want the answer to that question on second thought.

I will answer it anyway  :P

 

It is prototype, i think. Red part is plastic "vismod" or testing not-firing version to look at how it handles, IMO.

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Why did they go with bright red handguards? (or did they just add that on tv for some reason?)

 

.....Nevermind, I don't think I want the answer to that question on second thought.

 

 

I will answer it anyway  :P

 

It is prototype, i think. Red part is plastic "vismod" or testing not-firing version to look at how it handles, IMO.

 

 

It's red to indicate "Sharp Edges", so you don't skin your knuckles on all those cheesegraters.

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Red parts in American parlance represent either blank or non-firing parts on a gun, depending on what standard you follow.  A bright red part is included to indicate a part that does not function as a firing model.

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Red parts in American parlance represent either blank or non-firing parts on a gun, depending on what standard you follow.  A bright red part is included to indicate a part that does not function as a firing model.

Red/Yellow is used on BFA's mainly to keep "Joe" from trying to shoot live rounds with the BFA installed.

 You'll see blue used a lot to indicate "inert" with both ordinance and small arms. IIRC "BlueGun" is also a brand of solid inert replica for training.

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There is also an Asp brand known as red gun.

 

Red parts are used in testing to keep firearms testers from blowing themselves up on an incomplete gun.  The red parts often represent parts that are not yet tested, or are removed for testing, or are examples of non-shipping product.

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Hey Meplat, I designed a rifle for you, please give me feedback, I hope you like the design.

 

6ccb29fb60516e661bc543fe6a607895.png

I'll keep it in the kitchen, for the next time I need some grated parmesan

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There is also an Asp brand known as red gun.

 

Red parts are used in testing to keep firearms testers from blowing themselves up on an incomplete gun.  The red parts often represent parts that are not yet tested, or are removed for testing, or are examples of non-shipping product.

Not saying you're wrong, but I never saw any sign of that at Ruger or any other shop..

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1908 Schwarzlose blow-forward pistol

http://i.imgur.com/yf3iU2X.webm

An 1895 Lee Navy rifle recovered from the USS Maine

http://i.imgur.com/TgiPa3O.webm

The Pedersen rifle, a toggle-lock rifle that almost beat the M1 Garand

http://i.imgur.com/LyozIyJ.webm

Reproduction StG45(M), one of the last Nazi Sturmgewehr designs

http://i.imgur.com/TQMvolu.webm

1852 Slant-Breech Sharps rifle

http://i.imgur.com/EYXqRZN.webm

Reproduction VG.1-5, last-ditch Nazi autoloading rifle

http://i.imgur.com/984MX3p.webm

Remington Model 11, one of the first semi-auto shotguns

http://i.imgur.com/LZnrR20.webm

The 1912 Frommer Stop, a long-recoil action Hungarian handgun

http://i.imgur.com/DQNBAXH.webm

Mondragon 1894, one of the first straight-pull action rifles ever produced

http://i.imgur.com/BvikaqN.webm

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1908 Schwarzlose blow-forward pistol

http://i.imgur.com/yf3iU2X.webm

An 1895 Lee Navy rifle recovered from the USS Maine

http://i.imgur.com/TgiPa3O.webm

The Pedersen rifle, a toggle-lock rifle that almost beat the M1 Garand

http://i.imgur.com/LyozIyJ.webm

Reproduction StG45(M), one of the last Nazi Sturmgewehr designs

http://i.imgur.com/TQMvolu.webm

1852 Slant-Breech Sharps rifle

http://i.imgur.com/EYXqRZN.webm

Reproduction VG.1-5, last-ditch Nazi autoloading rifle

http://i.imgur.com/984MX3p.webm

Remington Model 11, one of the first semi-auto shotguns

http://i.imgur.com/LZnrR20.webm

The 1912 Frommer Stop, a long-recoil action Hungarian handgun

http://i.imgur.com/DQNBAXH.webm

Mondragon 1894, one of the first straight-pull action rifles ever produced

http://i.imgur.com/BvikaqN.webm

Ahh, look like Ian's vids..

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