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Another trick is to find (or have me send you one) a French recoil sleeve.  They were designed in 1952 because French rifles began to throw HUGE direct fire 22mm grenades as part of a new anti-tank strategy with the eventual ideal of having each member of a French squad able to tackle a tank.  These pad fit the comb of an Enfield and add about four centimeters to the reach.

 

Let me know if you want me to track one down for you.

 

Neat. I'll be taking you up on that offer when I get back at the end of August/early September.

 

Having an extra 1.6 inches would help the Enfield shoulder nicely. 

 

That rifle grenade strategy seems rather optimistic considering the rapid advancement of armor post-World War 2. Not saying it can't be done because Audie Murphy knocked out a (albeit disabled) tank in Italy as one of his exploits. Spam enough of them and something is bound to work.

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Neat. I'll be taking you up on that offer when I get back at the end of August/early September.

 

Having an extra 1.6 inches would help the Enfield shoulder nicely. 

 

That rifle grenade strategy seems rather optimistic considering the rapid advancement of armor post-World War 2. Not saying it can't be done because Audie Murphy knocked out a (albeit disabled) tank in Italy as one of his exploits. Spam enough of them and something is bound to work.

 

Each French squad has traditionally had since 1956 a LRAC and later Eyrx operator (where the main AT force comes from), a GPMG operator, a sniper with a long range marksman rifle, and 4-8 rifleman with grenade launchers that carry a wide range of grenades issued as needed for different missions.  When tanks threaten they carry a range of grenades that have between 700 and 800mm armor penetration.  The grenades are designed to attack the top of a turret.

 

In practice the French have never fought armor heavy enemies with infantry, but accounts of actions in Afghanistan where a squad carries 50 high explosive and WP grenades, plus AT grenades to break through concrete, say that the tactics were very effective.   

 

bazooka_1724433i.jpg

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Armor pen is like miles per gallon.  I know the rifle grenades have impressive penetrations, but I have always suspected that they are measured against 1960s armor.  properly fired rifle grenades though are unique in that their low velocity causes them to strike the top of the tank.  The main issue for rifle grenades in any case was always the size of their jet stream, as their small explosive load may not be enough to blow up a tank with wet storage ammo and other safety devices.

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Penetration is usually quoted against rolled homogeneous armor, which is quasi-standardized.

 

800mm pen is flat out insane and will kill a distressing number of MBTs from the front in the turret.  That's almost as good as the latest Russian 125mm gun-fired HEAT rounds, and better than RPG-29.  Are you sure on that number?

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Yeah, I just found my manual and realized my French is weak.  The table has examples of grenades but the top entry is for HOT - 800mm.

 

M31 is 200mm

Mle. 1952 is 250mm

The current grenades are just 66mm rockets without the rocket and penetrates 300mm

The HE round for the French is just a 60mm mortar round (and a 50mm mortar round in the 1950s) for a comparison of effectiveness with a 40mm

 

Americans in the 1960s tested the French Strix and refused to adopt it because it was a blank fired grenades and US soldiers had nearly 20 accidents during testing where they fired it with live ammo.  Modern French grenades use live ammo.

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Yeah, I just found my manual and realized my French is weak.  The table has examples of grenades but the top entry is for HOT - 800mm.

 

M31 is 200mm

Mle. 1952 is 250mm

The current grenades are just 66mm rockets without the rocket and penetrates 300mm

The HE round for the French is just a 60mm mortar round (and a 50mm mortar round in the 1950s) for a comparison of effectiveness with a 40mm

 

Americans in the 1960s tested the French Strix and refused to adopt it because it was a blank fired grenades and US soldiers had nearly 20 accidents during testing where they fired it with live ammo.  Modern French grenades use live ammo.

 

An aside regarding rifle grenades-

 

Blanks (salutes) and Blanks (GLB's) are not the same, nor are they interchangeable.  Less than amusing things happen if you try to fire a rifle grenade using a salute.

 

U.S. rifle grenades used to come issued with two GLB's, one in the base of the grenade (where the spigot would go) with a spare usually clipped to the body of the grenade as a backup.

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Yep - I have GLBs reloaded for me since my grenades are use blanks.  

 

I never really understood the theory that rifle grenades were too dangerous because "our guys did not know the difference between a blank and a bullet."  

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Since we are packing for Alaska. Here is Cricket and Charlie. His and her matching revolvers...

 

CricketCharlie_zpsxyotrhtg.jpg

 

The Model 629 .44 Magnum is "Charlie" my wife's Alaska gun which she got when the four-legged (and two-legged) vermin up on the Last Frontier got too much.

 

The Ruger SP101 .357 Magnum is "Cricket" and my EDC gun. Up in Alaska, the philosophy is that it is pretty much a noise-maker to get bears to move along. As such I usually load two or three rounds of .38 Special as a more affordable option. 

 

My wife anthropomorphizes everything.

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Your weapon is a clean and complete MAS 1949/56 - if it is reliable when you get it (there are two issues that can happen when a clod gunsmith gets ahold of them) then you will have one of the best full-size rifles of the 60 and 70s.  Yours was arsenal retouched in 1975 and 1985, the last one just prior to being exported to the US.  Let me know if you want some military ammo for it.

 

A titanium pin for the MAS is a worth while investment.

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That is in lovely condition. Now you need to find the cleaning kit, etc while they are still somewhat common.

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I would just get a pull-through for .30 cal, some pipe cleaners, and a strong cloth.  I used to carry my MAS into the desert in Washington and found that although it would function really well no matter how much sand was blown around, a paint brush was a welcome part of the cleaning.  

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I would just get a pull-through for .30 cal, some pipe cleaners, and a strong cloth.  I used to carry my MAS into the desert in Washington and found that although it would function really well no matter how much sand was blown around, a paint brush was a welcome part of the cleaning.  

The bits and bobs that were issued with the piece are part of the whole picture.

I'm not suggesting using an original kit, rather having it as part of the "whole".

 

This is similar to mine, save the pouch. The one I have is leather, and the toolpouch is a bit different.

I've also found a sling and a couple magazine/boxed ammunition pouches.

 

WXkZcR9.jpg

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Your weapon is a clean and complete MAS 1949/56 - if it is reliable when you get it (there are two issues that can happen when a clod gunsmith gets ahold of them) then you will have one of the best full-size rifles of the 60 and 70s.  Yours was arsenal retouched in 1975 and 1985, the last one just prior to being exported to the US.  Let me know if you want some military ammo for it.

 

A titanium pin for the MAS is a worth while investment.

 

 

That is in lovely condition. Now you need to find the cleaning kit, etc while they are still somewhat common.

 

 

I would just get a pull-through for .30 cal, some pipe cleaners, and a strong cloth.  I used to carry my MAS into the desert in Washington and found that although it would function really well no matter how much sand was blown around, a paint brush was a welcome part of the cleaning.  

 

 

That thing looks so great. You guys are killing me with this. If I go to the gun show next week, I'll probably put down for one of those if I see a good one.

 

Hey thanks for the encouragement guys. :) I knew what I was getting into, having already been a student of Huon's for several months now. Virdea, how much military ammo ya got? I would love some. I have a single round for my ammo collection, but nothing else yet. Planning on picking up some Prvi. Word on the street is to avoid the Syrian stuff like a Daesh whore.

 

I got really lucky with this one - $460 was the asking price. I called the shop up and had them put it on layaway for a third down. $172 (a third of price, shipping, and of course CC fee) to secure a MAS 49/56 is really easy on the wallet, even my SO approved. Adding my FFL's usual fee, my final price is $530, which is still the best deal on this gun I've seen since I got serious about getting one.

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My first one cost me 300 dollars.  Now they are hard to find south of 500 but the price is rapidly increasing.

 

I scored 2000 rounds from a guy who fired it wholesale in an AAT52.  He retired the gun from firing - mostly from expense, so links and all it went into my collection.  I also bought another 1000 rounds newly boxed when it was available surplus.  I have maybe 20 boxes of military - that has strippers for it in 15 round boxes.  All of this is corrosive and Berdan primed.  I will give you at least a box, and after figuring out how much I have, maybe a couple more.    

 

The Prvi needs the titanium firing pin or a shaved firing pin.  Titanium is expensive, shaving is cheap.  However Phil does it right with his pins.  

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I also have some cases and reloading supplies.  I do not reload anymore since my father died - it was a father / son experience.  My limit to giving away reload stuff an my original military packs is to have enough to give the next person who dives into the great 49/56.

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That thing looks so great. You guys are killing me with this. If I go to the gun show next week, I'll probably put down for one of those if I see a good one.

 

Just DO NOT get a .308 conversion unless you really trust the person who shot it last. Which, at a gun show, you don't.

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Just DO NOT get a .308 conversion unless you really trust the person who shot it last. Which, at a gun show, you don't.

 

There are properly repaired 308 versions, but the thing is once people have one, they do not give them up.  The gun smithing to fix one is straight forward, but you soon find you do not have a gunsmith in your town but a couple of AR assemblers, and when they ruin your rifle they shrug and say, tough.

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My first one cost me 300 dollars.  Now they are hard to find south of 500 but the price is rapidly increasing.

 

I scored 2000 rounds from a guy who fired it wholesale in an AAT52.  He retired the gun from firing - mostly from expense, so links and all it went into my collection.  I also bought another 1000 rounds newly boxed when it was available surplus.  I have maybe 20 boxes of military - that has strippers for it in 15 round boxes.  All of this is corrosive and Berdan primed.  I will give you at least a box, and after figuring out how much I have, maybe a couple more.    

 

The Prvi needs the titanium firing pin or a shaved firing pin.  Titanium is expensive, shaving is cheap.  However Phil does it right with his pins.  

 

Yes, by this time next year or the year after, these guns will be $800 or more, I guarantee it. Folks are quickly catching on to how good they are. If anyone reading wants one, I highly recommend you begin in earnest the search for a reasonably-priced one in decent shape.

PM sent about the goodies.

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There are properly repaired 308 versions, but the thing is once people have one, they do not give them up.  The gun smithing to fix one is straight forward, but you soon find you do not have a gunsmith in your town but a couple of AR assemblers, and when they ruin your rifle they shrug and say, tough.

 

I do know an actual gunsmith in Colorado who will fix Century's fuck up and do it right (he's done it before); he posts on this board in fact. If, heaven forfend, one of our readers manages to work their way into a buggered-up Century .308 gun, I would point them in his direction.

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As tempting as joining the MAS cult on the forum sounds.

 

dc6cy1.jpg

 

Something along the lines of this little number is still really high priority as far as older guns go.

 

potential heresy note, did they ever make a wooden pistol grip for the actual grip and not just the front foregrip? adding that to the above would make it perfect for me.

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As tempting as joining the MAS cult on the forum sounds.

 

dc6cy1.jpg

 

Something along the lines of this little number is still really high priority as far as older guns go.

 

potential heresy note, did they ever make a wooden pistol grip for the actual grip and not just the front foregrip? adding that to the above would make it perfect for me.

 

The Model 8 was offered in 5 varieties through most of its career, with the top three all having pistol grips.  The Model 8 shown above never existed in history that anyone can tell, but it does combine third party products in one package that could have come together.  I believe that picture was a modern production.

 

What you do see is a Model 8 standard model with a Krieger magazine modification (which you will pay several thousand dollars for) a peep sight (3-4 hundred if one is found on a stock rifle) and a custom grip (which was only known to be added by a few illegal gunsmiths).  The magazine is a Krieger extended 20rd, it alone can cost 1000 bucks. 

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The Model 8 was offered in 5 varieties through most of its career, with the top three all having pistol grips.  The Model 8 shown above never existed in history that anyone can tell, but it does combine third party products in one package that could have come together.  I believe that picture was a modern production.

 

What you do see is a Model 8 standard model with a Krieger magazine modification (which you will pay several thousand dollars for) a peep sight (3-4 hundred if one is found on a stock rifle) and a custom grip (which was only known to be added by a few illegal gunsmiths).  The magazine is a Krieger extended 20rd, it alone can cost 1000 bucks. 

 

Right, the vertical foregrip mod is inspired by Dillinger's use of the same on Winchester autoloading rifles (I believe multiple 1907s received the modification - Dillinger was super into guns), but I don't think I've ever seen an original Model 8 with that mod. The Krieger magazine was done for a few PDs in the 1950s, never for a gangster.

 

FIG1.jpg

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