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United States Military Vehicle General: Guns, G*vins, and Gas Turbines

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14 minutes ago, N-L-M said:

Shit, that's around $4mil per tank upgraded. Cost of being cutting edge I guess.

 

Well these are most likely old M1A1 being consumed, $4 mil isn't too bad for what is effectively a new tank.

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20 minutes ago, N-L-M said:

That is SEPv3. Somebody must have forgotten to rename the contracts.

It just seems like they've gone back on that decision, I don't think I've seen a single industry/military source call them that.

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The United States Marine Corps combat operations laboratory conducted a limited operational assessment of the MUM-T LOA (man-machine interaction) manned and unmanned formations at the Muscatatak training center (Indiana). A platoon of marines of the 2nd battalion of the 6th regiment of the US Marine Corps played 25 episodes of combat operations in conjunction with robotic systems.

 

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https://www.dvidshub.net/news/307133/effort-underway-update-give-light-armored-vehicles-extended-service-life

The fleet of Marine Corps Light Armored Vehicles will begin receiving a number of necessary upgrades under the terms of a $37.2 million contract awarded Jan. 4. General Dynamics Land Systems-Canada will perform the work, which includes the procurement of 60 hardware kits in support of the Light Armored Vehicle Reset Program. The enhancements are designed to extend the service life of the LAV into the 2030s.
Embedded in their original design, LAVs combine speed, maneuverability and firepower to perform a variety of functions, including security, command and control, reconnaissance and assault. The first LAVs were initially fielded in 1983. 
The reset effort will focus on five key areas:
• modernized powerpack to improve reliability, cooling capacity and diagnostics with the added benefit of better fuel economy
• new drive train which will improve towing capability
• steering dampener to improve road feel and usability 
• digitized drivers’ instrument panel
• LAV 25 slip rings—doubling power supply capability to the turret and modernized to handle additional channels for gigabit Ethernet, video and fiber optics
“The Marine Corps is committed to ensuring this platform remains viable into the 2030s,” said Steve Myers, LAV program manager. 
Active light armored reconnaissance battalions will be the first units to receive the upgraded vehicles, which will become LAV A3s. 

The hardware kits will be installed at Marine Corps Depots, with Initial Operational Capability targeted for the second quarter of fiscal 2021. 

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1 hour ago, Clan_Ghost_Bear said:

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The Main Battle System. A TARDEC concept that would move crewmen from the tanks into command vehicles,  enabling weight and crew savings over a 4-tank unit of Abrams by 50 percent.

https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/1015742.pdf

It's an inevitable path for the future, but to get there a shit ton of work would have to be made to provide an extremely noise-insensitive, and extremely secure network. Sounds like a project that's bigger than the MBT project itself.

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https://www.janes.com/article/86058/us-army-ramps-up-robotic-combat-vehicle-development-efforts



The US Army is on schedule to begin operational user testing of legacy M113 tracked armoured personnel carriers, converted to armed robotic platforms, later this year with real-world experimentation trials expected to inform future requirements for the Robotic Combat Vehicle (RCV) element of the service's Next-Generation Combat Vehicle (NGCV) programme.

The converted M113s will act as surrogate vehicles for what a next-generation RCV could look like as part of the service's plans to introduce manned-unmanned teaming (MUM-T) in ground manoeuvre combat. The army is currently looking at options for a light (L), medium (M), and heavy (H) RCV.

The vision for the RCV is to replicate similar capabilities already found in the air domain and enable soldiers to control robotic ground vehicles from a manned platform, reducing risk and increasing stand-off distances for personnel.

The US Army's Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) is leading these efforts, taking legacy M113s and adding appliqué "drive-by-wire" kits to enable teleoperated and autonomous operation.

"Right now, we are doing integration on the platforms and we are still doing our engineering shakedown and test," Dr Robert Sadowski, TARDEC's chief roboticist, told Jane's .

"Fourth quarter of [fiscal year] 2019 is when weʼre targeting to have these things available for soldiers to test and play with the surrogates," he added.

Safety testing is expected to take place at Aberdeen Proving Ground between June and August with the Army Test and Evaluation Command (ATEC).

This surrogate project builds on TARDEC's existing Wingman Joint Capability Technology Demonstration, during which a Humvee was fitted with a remote weapon station and converted for autonomous operations. This platform successfully carried out Scout Gunnery Table VI qualifications at Fort Benning in 2017, which ground combat crews usually complete before they can safely participate in higher-echelon live-fire exercises at section and platoon levels.

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https://www.defenceconnect.com.au/land-amphibious/3521-us-developing-abrams-upgrades-to-ensure-survivability-into-2030s/amp?__twitter_impression=true

 



The SEPv4 upgrades will ensure that the new variant of Abrams will be designed to be more lethal, faster, lighter, better protected and connected through a variety of technologies, including the incorporation of:
  • Improved sensors and optics, including a 360-degree radar, processor and on-board computer, an advanced FLIR optical system and long-wave sensors;
  • Enhanced armour and active protection systems (APS) to protect against a range of ordnance, including man-portable rocket propelled grenades (RPG), anti-tank guided missiles (ATGM) and enemy anti-tank rounds; and
  • Advanced weapons systems including the Advanced Multi-Purpose 120mm ammunition, which is designed to replace multiple rounds. 

Testing is projected to begin in 2021, with the objective to field the modernised SEPv4 variant by the early-to-mid-2020s

 

Curious if the radar is Trophy or something more permanent.

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https://asc.army.mil/web/portfolio-item/gcs-m1-abrams-main-battle-tank/

M1A2D: The most modern Abrams tank has started development; the cornerstone technology is the third generation (3GEN) FLIR, which will provide tank crews much greater lethality. The 3GEN FLIR will be an upgrade to both sights and will be common with other combat platforms. With the upgrade, the Abrams will integrate a color camera, Eye-safe Laser Range Finder and a cross-platform laser pointer to facilitate multidomain battle in to the commander’s sight. In addition to a lethality upgrade, the M1A2D will include full-embedded training to maximize crew proficiency of the system. This program began early enough to on-board any technology the Army deems critical to the future battlefield to include artificial intelligence, autonomy, APS or advanced sensors.

 

https://www.hensoldt.net/solutions/land/optronics/abrams-m1-eyesafe-laser-rangefinder-elrf/

Also available as M1 LRFD, eye-safe Laser Rangefinder and integrated 80mJ Laser Target Designator. Prototypes field tested by US Army and  USMC.

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4 hours ago, Ramlaen said:

I work with a guy who was a tank mechanic not so long ago (To where he is looking at re-enlisting in the KYNG).

I basically said "most of the improvements will be in gunnery and targeting.  You won't see shit in mobility".

 

Sad to see I'm right. part of me still wants a Laumer style "tank" that masses a few thousand tons, but can make a Ferrarri look slow.

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OMFV draft RFP

https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=723b90181e2db554750b7e50dbda7a30&tab=core&_cview=1

 

Quote

C.1.2.9.4 Sights


If the NGCV-OMFV is equipped with a Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) system that is equal to or better than the US Army’s 2nd Generation (GEN) FLIR, the contractor shall provide preliminary design artifacts with a detailed narrative explaining the approach, and its plan to integrate the U.S. 3rd GEN FLIR B-kit. The contractor’s design, narrative, and plan shall be delivered as part of CDRL A024.  
 
C.1.2.9.4.1 The Government will provide Night Vision Integrated Performance Model (NV-IPM) (Classified Attachment XXXX) and input deck (Classified Attachment XXXX) for the contractor to use to conduct the analysis in SOW paragraph C.1.2.9.4.2. The Government will provide updates to the model as they become available.   
 
C.1.2.9.4.2 The contractor shall provide NV-IPM - Sensor Detect, Recognize, and Identify Range Modeling and Reporting results as Classified Appendixes IAW CDRL A145 for the following subsystems:
 
(a) 2nd GEN FLIR or better performance, to include DRI table results.  This will be a classified submittal.
(b) 3rd GEN FLIR to include DRI table results.  This will be a classified submittal.
(c) Color Day Camera (CDC) performance, to include DRI table results.  This is unclassified submittal.

 

Quote

C.1.2.9.1 Primary Weapon System


If the NGCV-OMFV is equipped with a 30mm medium caliber cannon, the contractor shall demonstrate, in a preliminary design and narrative, its plan to integrate the 50mm medium caliber cannon, coax weapons, the CIWS, the CLOS missile, and a linkless ammunition handling system with the MCAS Fire Control architecture, in a future incremental upgrade. The contractor’s design and narrative shall be delivered as a P3I attachment IAW CDRL A024.  
 
C.1.2.9.2 Fire Control (FC) Architecture Integration with the Multi-Caliber Armament System
(MCAS) fire control system
 
C.1.2.9.2.1 50mm Medium Caliber Cannon (if applicable)
The contractor shall use the MCAS fire control system as part of the integrated FC architecture with the 50mm medium caliber cannon as the primary weapon. The integrated FC shall account for all weapon systems to include the primary, coaxial, Commanders Independent Weapon Station (CIWS), a Command Line of Sight (CLOS) missile and associated sensors to include, but not limited to, target acquisition and designation sensors, local situational awareness sensors, hostile fire detection sensors, and meteorological sensors. The FC Architecture shall account for simultaneous engagements with the primary or coax weapons, the CIWS, and the CLOS missile. This shall include a step-by-step timeline of all events related to detection of target through firing the weapon. The FC architecture shall include a System Interface List and an identification of all components within the FC system. The FC architecture shall include step-by step operational details (automatic and man-in-the-loop where applicable) on slew to cue processes for all target acquisition and designation sensors, local situational awareness sensors, hostile fire detection sensors and weapons. The FC architecture shall depict a logic flow diagram for detailed signal processing. This architecture shall be documented in the form of architectural views and narrative description and delivered as part of CDRL A024.
 
C.1.2.9.2.2 30mm Medium Caliber Cannon (if applicable)
The integrated FC shall account for all weapon systems to include the primary, coaxial, CIWS, a CLOS missile and associated sensors to include, but not limited to, target acquisition and designation sensors, local situational awareness sensors, hostile fire detection sensors, and meteorological sensors. The FC Architecture shall account for simultaneous engagements with the primary or coax weapons, the CIWS, and the CLOS missile. This shall include a step-by-step timeline of all events related to detection of target through firing the weapon. The FC architecture shall include a System Interface List and an identification of all components within the FC system. The FC architecture shall include step-by step operational details (automatic and man-in-the-loop where applicable) on slew to cue processes for all target acquisition and designation sensors, local situational awareness sensors, hostile fire detection sensors and weapons. The FC architecture shall depict a logic flow diagram for detailed signal processing. This architecture shall be documented in the form of architectural views and narrative description and delivered as part of CDRL A024.

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