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More video and photo of the EBRC:

 

https://twitter.com/ForcesOperation/status/996770642518298624

 

 

Spoiler

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DdUy0lOXkAcMkw8.jpg

 

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DdUF7r7XkAAk9vt.jpg

 

The wheels seem much bigger than on the initial CGI though, I hope that it has an adjustable suspension or the obstacle crossing capability will be poor:

 

Spoiler

2l-Image-57.jpg

jaguar-20180516.jpg

 

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2 hours ago, Alzoc said:

I hope that it has an adjustable suspension or the obstacle crossing capability will be poor:

well, there was a 3,5 yr old video from DefenseWebTV, and they explained a thing or two about it's capabilities, and around 1:00 this 3d model shown doing what appears to be an change of ground clearance



btw loooking at this photo:
CdGXU4Y.jpg
(from link to twitter posted by Ramlaen on previous page)
there:
2zV0qZ8.jpg
it seems like that wishbone axle is not parallel to ground, like if it's and adjustable and set in position of shorter-than-normal ground clearance.

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1 minute ago, skylancer-3441 said:

well, there was a 3,5 yr old video from DefenseWebTV, and they explained a thing or two about it's capabilities, and around 1:00 this 3d model shown doing what appears to be an change of ground clearance

 

True I completely forgot about that video.

So yes both adjustable suspension and adjustable tire pressure.

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18 hours ago, Alzoc said:

 

True I completely forgot about that video.

So yes both adjustable suspension and adjustable tire pressure.

From otvaga, those were pointed out:

WYEtx.jpg

They are exposed, which is not very good.

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True.

 

Given that those vehicles are supposed to replace the ERC 90 and the AMX 10 RC logic would want that the pneumatic system would at least be protected against 7,62 and shrapnel from OG-7 since that's basically what those vehicles were exposed to.

 

Spoiler

 

 

Maybe a simple cover-plate would do the trick, or moving them away (if it is possible, I don't know).

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16 minutes ago, Alzoc said:

True.

 

Given that those vehicles are supposed to replace the ERC 90 and the AMX 10 RC logic would want that the pneumatic system would at least be protected against 7,62 and shrapnel from OG-7 since that's basically what those vehicles were exposed to.

 

  Reveal hidden contents

 

 

Maybe a simple cover-plate would do the trick, or moving them away (if it is possible, I don't know).

Probably just a prototype thing, maybe system is not finished.

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2 minutes ago, LoooSeR said:

Probably just a prototype thing, maybe system is not finished.

 

Can only hope so.

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Some more infos on the VBMR light (as opposed to the 6x6 VBMR "heavy")

 

http://forcesoperations.com/le-vbmr-leger-sous-les-projecteurs/

 

Among other things:

 

-Hydrogas suspension

-350 hp for 15 to 18t

-Lots of off the shelf civilians components

-Texelis rejected the V shaped hull to use "another concept"

-Antares optical surveillance system by Thales

 

Spoiler

 

 

-Armor kit available (but they don't give the protection rating nor the basic protection of the vehicle)

-Pilar V acoustic shot detection system

 

Spoiler

 

 

-NBC protection

-A400M and C-130 transportable

-Connected to the Scorpion BMS

 

Spoiler

 

 

-10 infantryman with the FELIN system with 24h of combat load

 

The armored patrol vehicle (APV) version will be the first to be developed and shall start qualification in 2021.

There will be 10 kits for the APV version:

 

  • Basic infantry version
  • 81 and 120 mm mortar
  • Artillery observer
  • Command post
  • Ambulance
  • Combat engineers
  • MMP (AT version)
  • Supply
  • Short range air defense

The two other versions will be :

  • Tactical informations node (NTC) which will basically be a relay in complicated environment. There will be 4 (unknown) sub-versions. Qualification in 2023
  • Surveillance, Acquisition, Intelligence and Reconnaissance (SA2R), the electronic warfare version with 2 sub-versions. Qualifications in 2022

 

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On 5/16/2018 at 4:43 PM, Alzoc said:

 

Depends on what you mean by hybrids with electrically assisted turbochargers.

If it is what is described on the fig 1 of that paper then it's simply an hyperbar engine with an added battery (the turbine already serve as an APU in the Leclerc so there is no reason that would forbid turning the generator into a motor if needed).

Yes, it was what I was thinking. But wouldn't the electric motor give a much faster spool up time? 
Also, hooking it up the the main battery of the vehicle, it could use excess energy to power the motors, or use regenerative breaking the power equipment. 

 

 

On 5/16/2018 at 4:43 PM, Alzoc said:

 

  Hide contents

3qk8mC.jpg

 

If we are talking about adding electrical engine to drive the tracks at low speed while the diesel gets up to speed, then yes the turbine turbocharger becomes useless since an electrical engine will gives an even better acceleration.

Not necessarily, combining the power of the electric motor, with zero turbolag would be the best. 

 

On 5/16/2018 at 4:43 PM, Alzoc said:

 

Edit: Maybe you were thinking about removing the turbine completely and drive the compressor of the turbo with an electrical engine only. It is also a possibility.

Idea was to eliminate turbolag. But a electric compressor is also a great way of getting short bursts of power. 

 

On 5/16/2018 at 4:43 PM, Alzoc said:

 

Where there is a question however is in how compact the whole powerpack will be. One of the big advantage of the hyperbar engine is it's insane power density.

Given the size of current battery I think that's it's unlikely that an hybrid engine (Diesel-electric) plus it's battery would be more compact than an hyperbar engine (especially when considering than in the V8X the turbine is the APU and thus doesn't necessitate to add one).

What about a electrically assisted hyperbar turbo engine, with a electric starter/generator/regenerative break/electric motor. When the driver presses the accelerator, the electric motor in the turbo spools the turbo up to optimal RPM istantly, while the starter motor on the crankshaft provides high torque while the motor reaches its optimal RPM. The turbine helps the motor keep the turbo at optimal RPM. 

 

When the vehicle slows down, the excess energy in the turbo is scavenged, and the regenerative break recovers some of the energy and stores it in the battery. A exhaust scavenger system could also be used. When on overwatch, the turbine would power the equipment, and when one wants to silently change position, one can use the electric motor and battery for short, slow and silent movement. 

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36 minutes ago, Xoon said:

What about a electrically assisted hyperbar turbo engine, with a electric starter/generator/regenerative break/electric motor. When the driver presses the accelerator, the electric motor in the turbo spools the turbo up to optimal RPM istantly, while the starter motor on the crankshaft provides high torque while the motor reaches its optimal RPM. The turbine helps the motor keep the turbo at optimal RPM 

 

When the vehicle slows down, the excess energy in the turbo is scavenged, and the regenerative break recovers some of the energy and stores it in the battery. A exhaust scavenger system could also be used. When on overwatch, the turbine would power the equipment, and when one wants to silently change position, one can use the electric motor and battery for short, slow and silent movement

 

Sounds like a good idea.

 

Now about the CAESAR:

 

Nexter is working on a guided artillery shell for the CAESAR and they have apparently started some testing (TRL 5 passed)

The new shell will be called Menhir and will be a precision shell (canard wings, GPS and inertial guidance) with a circular error of 10m.

The range will be of 30km when fired from an L52 (shorter than the standard range which is 42 to 50km)

 

http://forcesoperations.com/wp-content/uploads/Img_7103-640x413.jpg

 

They are also working on a Menhir MkII which would reduce the circular error down to 2m when using a laser designator (the detector for the shell is already available from a cooperation with Thales a few years back).

They also hope to increase the range of the shell to 60km by working on a reduced drag and by adding small wings turning the shell into a glider.

Other options are being studied like in-flight retargeting and hardening the shell against GPS jamming.

 

As far as lethality enhancement goes they are proposing to use 3D printing to create alumide charges custom made to optimize fragmentation depending on the target.

 

http://forcesoperations.com/wp-content/uploads/Img_7105-640x427.jpg

 

All in all the goals seem to be pretty similar to the LRPF program in the US (bar the 70km range).

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2 hours ago, skylancer-3441 said:

Army Recognition's video - interview in french about Jaguar EBRC and also some closeup shots of this vehicle from different angles, for example:

Spoiler

 

 

 

Main infos given during the interview:

 

-Engine and transmissions are placed side by side for compacity

-Both forward and rear wheels are directional

-The vehicle can be driven as a 6x6 off-road or in propulsion mode when on road (the forward wheels are then decoupled from the transmission)

-800km range on internal fuel

-Stabilized commander optical sight was asked both for backup and for a better topography perception

-LRF  on the commander TV-Thermal sight (linked to the RCWS)

-7 episcopes on the commander hatch

-The gunner TV sight is exactly the same than the one of the commander (LRF, TV-Thermal) + an optical backup

-2 forward facing episcopes on the gunner hatch

-2 Antares systems for optical surveillance (see my previous post above) doubling as LWR, one on the far right front and one on the rear left of the turret

-3 forward facing episcopes for the driver, the one in the center can display the thermal and light intensification images from the cameras on the left of the driver hatch.

 

Spoiler

https://i.imgur.com/nFqlF1l.jpg

 

-2 proxy camera on each side of the vehicle to survey dead angles from 0 to 50m + one reverse camera

 

Spoiler

https://i.imgur.com/olnLLB2.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/bPa3vmY.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/3Dte6qm.jpg

 

-Any TV image from all the listed optics can be seen by any crew member on their display

-The RCWS can be decoupled from the commander sight (to observe without being menacing in peace keeping operations)

-2 missiles in the pod and 2 others at the rear of the vehicles, apparently they need to be reloaded from the outside.

-IED scrambling system is not displayed on this particular vehicle but will be installed

 

Spoiler

 

 

-An hard kill APS under development by TDA (Thales) is also on the contract

- Pilar V acoustic shot detection system

-All detected threats and alerts will be shared to other vehicles equipped with the Scorpion BMS (SICS) which are the Leclerc XLR, VBMR light and heavy, EBRC Jaguar (the VBCI won't be equipped with it for now).

 

Also on passive protection, he say that he not at liberty to say but give the following info:

 

-Crew capsule (already known)

-Both the Jaguar and the Gryffon comply with the new (?) STANAG on IEDs (they don't say at which level)

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49 minutes ago, Alzoc said:

 

Main infos given during the interview:

[...]

-The vehicle can be driven on a 6x6 or in propulsion mode when on road (the forward wheels are then decoupled from the transmission)

It can be useful after light damage on the front to keep moving. 

Quote

[...]

-The gunner TV sight is exactly the same than the one of the commander (LRF, TV-Thermal)

The PASEO sight.

Quote

[...]

-2 missiles in the pod and 2 others at the rear of the vehicles, apparently they need to be reloaded from the outside.

Yes.

Quote

-IED scrambling system is not displayed on this particular vehicle but will be installed

 

  Hide contents

 

He didn’t quote ECLIPSE but BARRAGE. The turret is « ready for - not fitted with ».

 

Quote

-An hard kill APS under development by TDA (Thales) is also on the contract

He quotes DIAMAN.

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10 minutes ago, Serge said:

He didn’t quote ECLIPSE but BARRAGE. The turret is « ready for - not fitted with ». 

 

Yes, but from what I could find ECLIPSE is a system part of the BARRAGE program which shall equip both the Griffon and the Jaguar.

 

10 minutes ago, Serge said:

He quotes DIAMAN. 

 

Yes, but I couldn't find anything about it on the TDA website other that this tiny picture (the pdf return a 404 error)

 

protection_lt.png?itok=nGNL8Kyc

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Some more minors infos on the Jaguar:

 

65, 40mm rounds ready to fire and 115 more stocked for a total of 180 on board.

7,8m long ; 3,5m high ; 3m wide

500hp volvo engine for a top speed of 80-90 km/h (on road I guess)

25t for 500hp meaning 20 hp/t

 

Oh and 400 rounds ready for the 7,62 RCWS as well as level 4 STANAG 4569 protection (base I guess).

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4 minutes ago, Xoon said:

Is the engine, the Volvo Penta D9-500?

 

Dont think so, the D9-500 seem to be a boat engine.

In the video @skylancer-3441 posted the spokeman say that it is a Renault engine (at 1:36) couple with a ZF automatic gearbox.

 

Spoiler

 

 

So it's most likely a motor coming from Renault Truck which happen to belong to Volvo.

Basically it's a truck engine customized for military uses.

 

My bet is the DXI 13:

 

 

https://corporate.renault-trucks.com/fr/les-communiques/considere-comme-la-reference-en-termes-dehellip.html

 

6 cylinders

13L

368 kW (=500 hp)

2450 Nm between  1050 and 1400 rpm

Works in a 80°C range (Temp between the coldest and hottest environment where it can work)

Can still work at 4500m of altitude (Chili)

 

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1 minute ago, Alzoc said:

 

Dont think so, the D9-500 seem to be a boat engine.

In the video @skylancer-3441 posted the spokeman say that it is a Renault engine (at 1:36) couple with a ZF automatic gearbox.

 

  Reveal hidden contents

 

 

So it's most likely a motor coming from Renault Truck which happen to belong to Volvo.

Basically it's a truck engine customized for military uses.

 

My bet is the DXI 13:

 

 

https://corporate.renault-trucks.com/fr/les-communiques/considere-comme-la-reference-en-termes-dehellip.html

 

6 cylinders

13L

368 kW (=500 hp)

2450 Nm between  1050 and 1400 rpm

Works in a 80°C range (Temp between the coldest and hottest environment where it can work)

Can still work at 4500m of altitude (Chili)

 

I guessed it was Volvo Penta, since they had produced engines for tanks in the past, IKV 90 for example. The CB90 and CV90 shares engines by the way, as a example.

 

But a Renault engine makes a lot more sense.

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