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Toxn

Bittereinder 4: because we don't have a proper big guns section

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Part 4 in an ongoing series.

 

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Entrance cannons are a universal theme for museums. Lord knows why.

 

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German AT guns get their own niche. Dear god but the '88 is huge.

 

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Pom-poms!

 

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I wasn't joking when I said that the area between the two Halls is packed with artillery.

 

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Misc naval guns.

 

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Remember that time when the Germans inexplicably re-bored a Russian field gun and used it as a much more powerful antitank gun? This one also has authentic battle damage!

 

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Misc park area guns.

 

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G5.

 

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Italy can into AT guns.

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21 minutes ago, Belesarius said:

The artillery thread begs to differ with your assertion made in the thread title.

 

Except it's in the 'mechanized warfare' section.

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Is it wrong that my mental autocorrect automatically corrects the first word of this thread title to BITCH REINDEER?

 

Intellectually I know this has nothing to do with female reindeer with salty dispositions, but I still read it as bitch reindeer.

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