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2 minutes ago, Renegade334 said:

What about resilience to HEAT jets? Do the air bubbles help with that or is the mitigation negligible?

If the foam is filled with something (fuel, maybe) then it could provide decent HEAT protection.

 

Against APFSDS it won't do much.

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9 hours ago, Xlucine said:

Metal foam should just act like a whipple shield against HEAT (i.e. probably quite good against the jet tip)

But isn't a HEAT jet quite different from something floating/flying around in space? Sure the speeds involved might be the same, but if you encounter something with the length of a precursor (~5 cm) in space, you're still royally fucked I think.

 

19 hours ago, Toxn said:

If the foam is filled with something (fuel, maybe) then it could provide decent HEAT protection.

 

Against APFSDS it won't do much.

For as far as I know diesel filled armour only works when it's confined:

f390ba35c6.png

 

If the shockwave doesn't/can't reflect back to the jet it won't slow it down.

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NERA & ERA from South-Africa

 

HA.jpg

Quote

HEAVY AMOUR

  • Development of heavy amour systems primarily for application in Main battle tanks.
  • This configuration has up to date defeated the following threats:
  1. 105mm KE Mk 3 – 530mm pen
  2. 120mm KEW – ± 600mm pen
  3. 120mm F1 KE – ± 640 mm pen
  4. 180mm HEAT warhead – 1300mm pen
  5. TOW II HEAT warhead 1000 mm pen
  6. 53/145mm tandem HEAT warhead – 1100mm pen

 

alk-2.jpg

Ingwe ATGM being tested against armor

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