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Wait... He is comparing the fact that the Arjun apparently has an exterior phone for infantry like it's fucking 1950 Korea and brushing off the fact that the US has - you know - radios and computers incorporated into a land warrior communication program showing users the location of friendliest and badguys which are simultaneously up linked to air, artillery and headquarters assets?

Abrams doesn't have a phone?  Hey blacktail, what the fuck is this then?

 

21116704365_897c4795ab_o.jpg

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Or the fact that he rates a manual transmission better than an automatic.

 

How would he rate chieftain's transmission?  It's got a manual gear selector, but the guts of an automatic?  Or what about various German designs which had manual transmission guts that are shifted automatically?

Or is there any indication that Blacktail knows that automatic and manual transmissions work completely differently?

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I imagine the odds of him knowing are about the same odds of India actually developing a weapons systems that's both half decent and actually functional at the same time. (or, hell, even one of those.)

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This thread is now the third google result for "Blacktaildefense," and fourth if you search "Blacktail defense."  Truly, my plan to harvest e-fame from lunatics with inflammatory forum postings is going well.  Soon, innocent people who just wanted to learn a thing or two about tanks will read my evil writ, and my plans can enter Phase Two.

 

 

We are moving on up!  According to a search I did today, this thread comes up second in google when looking for "Blacktail Defense" or "Blacktaildefense."  

 

Has anyone mentioned yet that Blacktaildefense makes his own furry porn

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Yeah, well known that he does.

 

When he mentions he hasn't had what can laughably be called a "video" recently due to being busy, one can only wonder what twisted fucking shit he was doing that made him so busy.

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I blame y'all for getting me to Google Blacktaildefense:

 

http://blacktailfa.deviantart.com/art/The-Half-Crewed-Tank-Scam-210497447

 

+1 to whomever manages to read all that without getting brain damage.

The best part is that he has put in so much effort to refute an article written in 1992.  

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I had to reread the opening post to this thread, to remember if BWD was as absolutely unabashedly and un-fucking-beliveably batshit as I remember.

 

I am posting to indicate that my memory is still clear on the matter. "Utterly Bonkers".

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It seems we aren't the only ones taking a piss at BTD.

m1_abrams_apc_by_giganaut-d8u6e6h.jpg

 

 

Joint project between Giganaut heavy industries and Blacktail Defense to create the perfect american APC for tomorrow's warfare. to replace ALL equipment of american military, air land and sea! even the infantry's grenades!

introducing the  M1 ABRAMS APC! 
here are the key points:
- it can carry alot of personnel! (eat your heart out M114! )
- has tracks and wheel system! (best of both worlds for heavy load carrying and fast turning!)
- it has F-35 wings! so you know it DOES go fast!
- Osprey engines! (MORE FASTER!) 
- MURICA CAMO! (so only TRUE PATROITS can see where the tanks are hidden!) 
- equipped with deployable growlers! (one on the back deck and one spare duct taped to the food trailer) and tactical segways!
- it breaks its speed record of 45 mp/h! 
- proven during the gulf wear so it is a good IFV/APC/TONK so it will replace all the shermans in service!
- driven by underpaid and disgruntled postal workers!
- it has WMD detection scanners! (another acronym would be o.i.l. which means Obviously Illegal Lemons)

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