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LoooSeR

Syrian tanks at war. Some pictures and words between them.

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Is there any evidence that armies with older T-72s are looking to get upgrade kits because of the Syrian conflict?  Syria seems to be doing a good job of showing the weaknesses of legacy T-72s in urban combat.

No major info, so i think "no".

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Do armies only learn when the pain is happening to them?  There are decades of examples of tank weaknesses in urban combat and what to do about them!

That is basically what Russian army was and still is. 

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That is basically what Russian army was and still is.

Due alot to low budget and having to implod apon a asymmetrical doctrine rather than inate incompetence

As evidenced by effectiveness of the army in Ukraine

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