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The PLAAF and Airborne: a look at the past, present, and the future.


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   A full-size mock-up, presumably of a stealth reconnaissance-assault unmanned aerial vehicle, represented by China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC). Zhuhai, 11/04/2018 (c) Mikhail Zherdev

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Full-size mock up of stealth reconnaissance-strike unmanned aerial vehicle XY-280 (data on the developer are not yet available). Zhuhai, 11/04/2018 (c) Mikhail Zherdev

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   Judging by satellite images of the Xi'an Aircraft Industrial Corporation in Xi'an, China, made in October 2018, in addition to the seven military transport aircraft of the PLA Air Force, another 13 aircraft of this type were observed at the flight test station of the airline.

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   In service of PLA AF^

 

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   Y-20 infographics:

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Yo, lurker poking by. I know WT links and all are frowned upon here but I've been looking to find anyone who has more resources for the J-12 (歼-12?). I have a WIP post for it but literally every source is coming from a website (will be listing below)

 

 

What I'm particularly interested in are the documents (if any) where all these websites are pulling the performance figures from. It's a fairly intriguing lightweight supersonic that I just can't find much on. I did a quick cursory search on this forum to see if any mention of it was brought up but nothing came up either. 

 

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Thanks

-Flametz

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On 6/26/2019 at 3:15 PM, Collimatrix said:

@Akula_941 You know anything about this?

@Flametzmost of the information, history and data of J-12 comes from the chief designer Lu Xiao Peng(陆孝彭)'s Memoirs. You don't get documents,or any accurate source. The original report and stuff are no doubt still classified, that's how thing works here   

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