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Just now, Oedipus Wreckx-n-Effect said:

Everyone think's their the shit until you put them on a shot timer. 

 

It is the great humbler.

 

Well the difference is I actually have experience in USPSA/ISPC and IPDA unlike most of the people that shit talk big like that who have never entered a competition in their life. Hell, I have an entire section in my walk in safe dedicated to nothing but competition pieces.

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4 minutes ago, Oedipus Wreckx-n-Effect said:

Everyone think's their the shit until you put them on a shot timer. 

 

It is the great humbler.

 

I give myself something like odds of finishing a stage before the par time. Maybe. If I do well.

 

15 minutes ago, Khand-e said:

 

Well the difference is I actually have experience in USPSA/ISPC and IPDA unlike most of the people that shit talk big like that who have never entered a competition in their life. Hell, I have an entire section in my walk in safe dedicated to nothing but competition pieces.

 

That'd be awesome, you should totally give it a go.

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18 hours ago, xthetenth said:

"Mutant" is a loaded way to say "centerpiece of a modern secondary weapon system".

 

I'll be interested to see how effective it is.

 

It's nothing all that exciting. Just your average pretty vanilla g26 with g19 barrel and slide, Goshen hexsites (because they work for me), and +2 round base plates with the "pinky hook".

 

The gun set up this way fits my body shape, preferred carry options, and wardrobe in a nice inoffensive way. It's a gun i can carry daily without tailoring my wardrobe or etc to the gun, yet can still shoot proficiently to much more than 21 feet if I were to ever really need to.

 

For my life and my needs it's about perfect. It rides around with me at all times and leaves me that nice warm feeling of dependability /  reliability that condoms and full coverage car insurance give me. 

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16 hours ago, roguetechie said:

 

It's nothing all that exciting. Just your average pretty vanilla g26 with g19 barrel and slide, Goshen hexsites (because they work for me), and +2 round base plates with the "pinky hook".

 

The gun set up this way fits my body shape, preferred carry options, and wardrobe in a nice inoffensive way. It's a gun i can carry daily without tailoring my wardrobe or etc to the gun, yet can still shoot proficiently to much more than 21 feet if I were to ever really need to.

 

For my life and my needs it's about perfect. It rides around with me at all times and leaves me that nice warm feeling of dependability /  reliability that condoms and full coverage car insurance give me. 

 

Ah okay. That sort of mutant. What I'm trying to do really warrants a dismissive "it's the platform for a system with these cool things, let's talk about those because they're cool".

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