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Bronezhilet

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Since I've been studying Latin in school and also Russian in my free time, I've been noticing some curious patterns regarding the inflections of each. The verb conjugation endings are nearly identical between the two, but noun declension is way, way different. 

 

To show:

 

Russian 1st conjugation verb endings:                                                       Latin:

                              Singular                        Plural                                               Singular        Plural

                                     -yu                                 -yem                                               -o                    -amus

                                     -yesh                             -yetye                                             -as                   -atis

                                     -yet                                -yut                                                 -at                    -ant

 

But if we look at nouns, it's totally different.

 

For starters, Russian has an extra case compared to Latin, the instrumental, used when something is an instrument in an action. In Latin this would just be another use for the accusative. 

 

                           Russian 1st declension noun endings:                                Latin:

                                    Singular                        Plural                                               Singular     Plural

                  Nominative                        -a               -i                                                      -a                 -ae

                  Genitive                              -i                (noun stem)                                   -ae              -arum

                  Dative                                 -ye             -am                                                  -ae              -is

                  Accusative                         -u              -i                                                       -am             -as

                  Prepositional                     -ye            -akh                                                  -a                 -is

                  Instrumental                      -oi             -ami

 

I can see how they would be somewhat similar, both being Indo-European languages, but why one part of speech would be inflected so similarly, but the other so differently. 

 

Also, question for better Russian-speakers than me: How, in speech, are Й and И distinguished?

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On 21.1.2016 at 5:19 AM, Vanagandr said:

Fun ancedote; I had some very specific problems when I tried to learn Spanish. I know German well, and I know some Swedish, and there are a surprising number of false friends. 'Es' means 'it' in German, and 'it is' in Spanish. 'En' means 'the' in Swedish or 'in' in Spanish. 'Og', pronounced 'oh, means 'and' in Swedish, while 'o' in Spanish, pronounced the same, means 'or'. 'Y', in Spanish is pronounced the same as 'i' in Swedish; the former means 'and', the latter means 'in'. 'De' means 'of', in Spanish, and means 'they' in Swedish, but it is pronounced 'dome'. It took several weeks before I could reliably keep myself from pronouncing 'de' Swedishly. I still use 'es' in Spanish as the German 'es', which fortunately is fairly interchangeable, at least to the point that I'm understood.

 

Another interesting thing is that whenever I learn languages now, I tend to relate them to German. IE Spanish first person's -o conjugation to German -e, second person -as to -st, third person plural -en to -en, etc.

Not to discredit you or anything, but "the" does not exist in Scandinavian languages. 

 

"En" means specifically one, singular, only one.  In Swedish/Norwegian/Danish  "En bil" translates to "One car" or "A car" in English.  

However, "The car" translates to "Bilen".

And because we Scandinavians hate consistency, this does not even necessarily carry over to other words. Example: "Bilen, døra, huset, dama, og hode" translates into "The car, the house, the lady (or girlfriend), and the head"

 

And to make matters worse, we have loads and loads of dialects. Oslo-, Østlendings-, Telemarks-, Agders-, Stavangers-, Sørlendings-, Bergens-, Sogner-, Sogn og Fjordanenes-, Sunnmørs-, Ålesunders-, Moldensers-, Nordals-, Trønders-, midtlendings-, Nordlendings-, and immigrant speak dialects. 

 

And this is only the few most commonly known ones. I could probably write a page or two. 

 

Most likely, if you learn Norwegian, you will learn the Eastener dialect and bokmål, the governments most used written language. You might learn nynorsk, which is more akin to a compound of the dialects of Norway, and if you are a hipster, you could learn blandingnorsk, which is a mix of both. But you might end up with a "foreigner dialect" since many people that try to learn Norwegian without speaking with Norwegians end up with no dialect, making them sound very stale. 

 

I dunno how close Germans and Dutch are, but Norwegians and Danish share basically the same written language, since those bastards only wanted danish to be though at universities and to be used by the government, and since the Black death pretty much killed everyone, wiping out Norse. Our verbal language is closer to Swedish though, so we can easily communicate, though with some errors. Danish is a bit harder, and but we can still understand each other if we have to, but most of the time we prefer English.  Icelandic is a bit harder, which is old Norse. Takes a bit for me to understand, but I still understand them. 

 

The finish sounds like this for us" Hakka paka, pelite mitrta makke", basicly a lot of "akka, pelite", same goes for Sami. 

 

When it comes to German, we can communicate very basically. 

 

And English you may ask? Well, pretty much every kids past primary school speaks and writes English as well as a American. 

 


 

 

 

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12 hours ago, EnsignExpendable said:

 

Quite poorly?

Depends on the person, but yes, a 13 year old Norwegian does about as well as a average adult American. 

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I went to a random fishery north of Bergen and the locals spoke enough English for me to buy some incredibly cheap (at least for Norway) fresh fish. The guy at the gas station also spoke sufficient English, although he didn't feel like explaining how the bottle refund machine worked and glumly watched me get about a dozen receipts of 10 ore each until I figured out how to make it process more than one bottle at a time.

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18 hours ago, Sturgeon said:

 

I've spoken with Norwegians before, and this isn't true.

 

17 hours ago, EnsignExpendable said:

I went to a random fishery north of Bergen and the locals spoke enough English for me to buy some incredibly cheap (at least for Norway) fresh fish. The guy at the gas station also spoke sufficient English, although he didn't feel like explaining how the bottle refund machine worked and glumly watched me get about a dozen receipts of 10 ore each until I figured out how to make it process more than one bottle at a time.

You two probably ended up speaking with the older generation, which English is very bad honestly. 

 

 

 

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Their English was/is definitely very good. On par with the level of English Germans speak (which is very good). But it's still not as good as most Americans.

 

People like to joke that Americans can't speak their own language, and while some can't that's really more true of the British.

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