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Japans Box Tank O-I

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O-I

 

The O-I (オイ車 Oi-sensha) was a super-heavy tank prototype designed by the Imperial Japanese Army during the Second Sino-Japanese War after the Battles of Nomonhan in 1939. The O-I is one of the Second World War’s more secretive tank projects, with documentation regarding the tank being kept private for over 75 years at Wakajishi Shrine, Fujinomiya. Surviving files have been purchased by FineMolds Inc., and publicly previewed in mid-2015. The multi-turreted 150-ton tank was designed for use on the Manchurian plains as a supportive pillbox for the Imperial Japanese against the Soviet Union. The project was disbanded four years after the initial development began, deemed unsatisfactory for continuation in 1943 after the lack of resource material for the prototype.

 

pn5bAGO.jpg

 

History and development

 

 

After 1939, the Imperial Japanese Army quickly came to realize that previous forms of mechanized warfare were proved inefficient after their defeat at Khalkhin Gol.
 

Development of the super-heavy project was spearheaded by Colonel Hideo Iwakuro, the head of the Ministry of War of Japan (陸軍省 Rikugun-shō). Iwakuro opposed Japan’s advances towards the Soviet Union in 1939, and with the Japanese defeat, he decided to initiate a project to construct a heavily armored tank capable of withstanding large-caliber field cannons. Iwakuro assigned Colonel Murata of the 4th Technical Research Group to design and construct the super heavy tank in 1939. Colonel Murata noted Iwakuro’s words as described;
 

「満州の大平原で移動トーチカとして使えるような巨大戦車を作ってほしい。極秘でだ。」
“I want a huge tank built which can be used as a mobile pillbox in the wide open plains of Manchuria. Top secret.”

 

「今の戦車の寸法を2倍に延ばして作れ。」
“Make the dimensions twice that of today’s tanks.”

 

The 4th Technical Research Group began designing the super-heavy vehicle throughout 1940, attempting to meet Colonel Iwakuro’s vague instructions on the ultimate goal of the project. By March 1941, the research group had finished initial tank design and was ready to begin construction. The following month, a group of pre-selected engineers were chosen to partake in the building of the super-heavy tank. One recorded engineer was Shigeo Otaka, who stated they were sent to the 4th Technical Research Group’s previous headquarters in Tokyo. There, they were guided through a barracks containing multiple small fitting rooms, where they were to conduct meetings and reports on the progress of construction of the super-heavy vehicle. Towards the end of the barracks facility was a fully-enclosed room devoid of windows, with soundproofed walls to prevent external personnel from overhearing discussions related to the project. Each officer present possessed a portion of the project’s blueprint, which, when assembled, projected the full design of the tank, labeled "Mi-To". The name originated from a collection of the Mitsubishi industry and the city, Tokyo; given to the vehicle to uphold secrecy of the tank’s project.

 

 

pADjs4J.pngYmrhrPk.jpg

Colonels Murata and Iwakuro 

 

The chosen engineers voiced their concerns regarding the Mi-To’s design noting that previously, the largest-sized Japanese tank had been the prototype Type95 Heavy in 1934. Issues that had been noted with heavy tank experiments in the years preceding the Mi-To showing Japan’s generally unsuccessful testing on multi-turreted vehicles exceeding the weight of standard armored vehicles. However, with the threat of a second Russo-Japanese conflict becoming more apparent, the project continued despite the engineer’s doubts on the size and mobility of the vehicle.

 

eT02m7U.jpg

Four engineers who survived to record the dealing had with the project

On April 14th 1941, the engineers began the construction of the Mi-To under secretive means. This entailed privately-made mechanical parts and equipment being shipped to the construction zone. Colonel Murata’s original concept was to complete the super-heavy tank three months after the initiation of Mi-To’s construction. This, ultimately, did not come into fruition; as technical issues on the project began to arise. Due to the limitation on material consumption by the government, the amount of parts that could be secretly shipped-in began to dwindle. By the first month of construction, essential construction resources had been depleted and the issues with the vehicle’s cooling system further caused delays. The construction of the Mi-To was postponed until January 1942, a delay of nine months.
 

After the Mi-To’s construction was resumed, the hull was completed on February 8th 1942. The tank had reached near-completion and was being prepared for mobility testing. Mitsubishi built the four turrets for the tank in May of the same year. Initial assembly of the tank’s armament took place soon after the turret’s superstructures were completed. However; the project once again did not have the necessary resources needed for the few remaining parts required for the final assessment. Due to this, the primary turret was removed as it lacked a 35-millimeter-thick roof plate, which had not yet arrived. Thus, the project was put on standby, until further development could continue. The total weight of the vehicle at the time was 96 tons, due to the lack of remaining structural plates and absent 75mm bolted-on armor.

 

40.jpg
O-I documents previewed by FineMolds

 

The date on which the construction of the tank resumed is unknown, although active testing of the tank was scheduled for late 1943. The tank was unveiled to the Imperial Japanese Army’s highest command in 1943, and received a name change to O-I. This followed Japanese naming convention (O translating to Heavy, I for First, making it "First Heavy") that was standard. In his place was Lieutenant Colonel Nakano, Murata's assistant and colleague. Tomio Hara, head of the Sagamia Army Arsenal, was also present. Following the demonstration, senior officials within the IJA requested that field trials begin in August of the same year. The tank was disassembled at 2:00 AM one night in June of 1943 and sent to the Sagami Army Arsenal in Sagamihara, 51 kilometers from Tokyo. The vehicle arrived at the depot in June, and was reassembled and tested on the 1st of August.

On the day of the trials, the O-I performed satisfactorily until the second hour of the tests. While maneuvering on off-road terrain, the tank sank into the ground by up to a meter; attempts at traversing the hull to extricate the vehicle proved fruitless, resulting in further sinking due to the vehicle’s suspension coils compressing. The tank was eventually towed out, and further testing was continued on concrete. However, the earlier damage to the suspension resulted in vehicle’s movement damaging the concrete, which in turn, further damaged the suspension bogies to the point that further testing could not continue. The trials were postponed, and later canceled the following day.
 

Nevertheless, the trials conducted at the testing field were considered to be a success, and the vehicle was deemed ready for use in spite of its flaws. The engineers began disassembly of the tank on the 3rd of August due to resources being limited and the inability to maintain the tank in the field. Disassembly of the tank was completed on August 8th. Two days later, the engineers noted in a log that they were to inspect the parts and conduct research to fix the issues the O-I would face.
 

The fate of the O-I after its field-trials which took place on the 1st of August is unclear. Russian reports claim the Japanese were in possession of a wooden O-I mock-up mounting a Daimler-Benz DB 601A engine in 1945, however other sources point to the scrapping of the remaining parts of the same year. The remains of the O-I reside at the Wakajishi Shrine, with a track link of the prototype still present.

 

hkTivIt.jpg

Remaining track link of the prototype O-I tank

 

Design

 

The O-I was conceived out of the necessity to produce an armored vehicle capable of withstanding modern weaponry being able to return fire with similar firepower. The O-I was designed to act as a mobile pillbox, supporting infantry and mechanized groups along the border  of the Soviet Union. The tank had a length of 10.1 meters, width of 4.8 meters, and a height of 3.6 meters. The dimensions of the vehicle closely matched those of the Panzer VIII Maus. The tank was envisioned to have a standard thickness of 150 millimeters front and rear, in order to protect against common anti-tank weapons of the time, yet it was constructed with armor 75 millimeters thick. However, an additional armor plate could be bolted on to bring the total thickness of the armor to 150 millimeters. The use of additional armor allowed for ease of construction and transportation, while also providing the tank with additional defense. Side armor on the hull superstructure was 70 millimeters thick. The additional armor plates were 35 millimeters thick,  but armor surrounding the suspension was only 35 millimeters thick. This made the tank’s theoretical armor on the side 75 millimeters.  There were eight wheel-supporting beams located on both sides of the suspension area which added an additional 40 millimeters of armor to specific locations on the side of the O-I. 40 ladder pieces were placed around the tank to provide crew with the ability to climb onto of the vehicle with ease.

 

The two 47mm cannons used in the two frontal turrets were also modified to fit the armor layout of the tank. The weapon’s barrels were reinforced with steel to secure them to the tank, due to the standard gun not adequately fitting into the turret.

 

zOdKM6P.png

 

 

The tank was both designed and built with two inner armor plates to divide the interior into three sections; walls with two doors each and an ultimate thickness of 20mm. This allowed the crew and modules to remain relatively safe while the structure was kept safe with supporting stands. These supports allowed the interior armor plates to stay stable and also prevented collapse. Inside the O-I were two Kawasaki V-12 engines, both located in the rear, parallel lengthwise, to give room for the rear turret operator and transmission. The transmission copied that of the Type97 Chi-Ha’s, but used larger parts and gears making the total weight heavier. The vehicle had a coil spring system, with eight 2 wheeled boggies, totaling 16 individual wheels.

 

 

pKe3rnM.jpg

 

 

Data Sheet

 

 

General


Name: O-I

Factory: Private - Mitsubishi

Units Produced: 1

Type: Super Heavy Tank

Year Built: February 8th 1942

Length: 10.1 m

Width: 4.8 m

Hull Width: 4833 mm

Height Full: 3.6 m

Turret height: 1065 mm

Track width: 800 mm

Track Pitch: 300 mm

Track Thickness: 58 mm Half, 108 mm Full

Total Weight: 150t (96t prototype)


Engine


Name: Type98 V12 Kawasaki

Power: 550hp (1100hp total with second engine)

Weight: 1020kg

Gears: 6

Lubricant type: Oil

Maximum speed: 40kmh onroad (prototype),  29.4 kmh (design) onroad


Hull


Hull height: 2530 mm

Hull Width: 4833 mm

Upper Front Plate: 150mm @ 56,29°

Lower Front Plate: 150mm @ 45°

Lowest Front Plate: 70mm @ 70,5°

Side plate:  35mm @ 0° + Bolted 35mm @ 0°

Superstructure side plate: 75mm @ 0°

Upper Rear Plate: 150mm @ 18°

Lower Rear Plate: 150mm @ 33,01°

Lowest Rear Plate: 30mm @ 75,99°

Top plate: 50mm @ 0°

Bottom plate thickness: 30mm @ 0°


Turret Primary


Turret height: 1065 mm

Turret side faces: 150mm @ 90°

Turret top: 50mm @ 0°

Turret Ring: 1870 mm


Armament


Model: Type96 15cm Howtizer

Weight: 4,140 kg

Elevation: -5 ° to + 20 °

Amount of ammunition: 100+

Type of ammunition: Type95 APHE, Type92 Spifire HE, 4th Year HEAT


Ammunition Types


Name: Type95 APHE

Shell weight: 36000g

Fire speed: 540m/s

Penetration: 125mm @ 230m, 120mm @ 510m, 112mm @ 755m, 102mm @ 1000m

Explosives: 6150g


Name: Type92 Spifire HE

Shell weight: 36000g

Fire speed: 540m/s

Explosives: 6150g


Name: 4th Year HEAT

Shell weight: 21040g

Fire speed: 650m/s

Explosives: 6150g



Secondary Armament


Model: Type1 47mm Experimental

Weight: 600(+/-) kg

Elevation: -10 ° to + 20 °

Amount of ammunition: 100+

Type of ammunition: Type1 APHE, Tungsten Alloy Toku Kou Prototype


Name: Type1 APHE

Shell weight: 36000g

Fire speed: 810m/s

Penetration: 65mm @ 200m, 65mm @ 500m, 50mm @ 1000m, 45mm @ 1500m

Explosives: 17g


Name: Tungsten Alloy Toku Kou Prototype

Shell weight: 36000g

Fire speed: 810m/s

Penetration: 85mm @ 0m, 79mm @ 200m, 70mm @ 500m, 56mm @ 1000m, 45mm @ 1500m

Explosives: 17g

 

 

 

Sources
 
O-I documentation, Finemolds
O-I project report notebook 1,2,3,4,5, and 6 (Finemolds)
- JP Tank Perfect Guide
- 日本の戦車 原乙未生 (Hara's book)
 
(Old sources)
帝国陸軍陸戦兵器ガイド1872-1945
日本陸軍の火砲 野戦重砲
戦車と戦車戦
太平洋戦争秘録 日本・秘密兵器大全
 
 
----------------------
 
​Since the article Soukou and Daigensui wrote long ago is filled with inconsistencies and errors, decided to make something thats actually accurate to the reports. Wrote it on Google Docs initially, posted it to WT earlier. Will be present on Ritas blog and eventually Wikipedia. 

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So is there any truth to the existence of multiple versions like the old O-I article and WG depict?

 

Not at the moment based solely off these reports. The prior knowledge of the O-Ni and O-Ho converges with the O-I 150t, so its safe to assume they aren't real. At least at the moment history wise. The designs may have been alternates to the original, but theres no evidence supporting that.

 

The O-I prototype WG made does not match up the historical model. They recreated it to make it appear unique to the players. 

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O-Ni and O-Ho are called O-I 100t and O-I 120 t in the game files, for whatever that's worth. The actual O-Is are called Mi-Tos for some reason

 

O-Ni and O-Ho are names WG created to prevent a line of "O-Is". They were called the 100t and 120t prior to WG implementing them, thats why.

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And I swear the Japanese heavies in game attract the highest percentage of scrub 43 percenters playing them.

 

I know they're little more than napkin-waffe but these designs make the Germans look sane. 

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Out of curiousity, did Japan ever come up with any tank designs in the more "normal" range for heavies (such as about 50-75 tons, or thereabouts)?

 

 

And I honestly lost my shit at this line;


「今の戦車の寸法を2倍に延ばして作れ。」
“Make the dimensions twice that of today’s tanks.”

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Out of curiousity, did Japan ever come up with any tank designs in the more "normal" range for heavies (such as about 50-75 tons, or thereabouts)?

 

 

And I honestly lost my shit at this line;

 

Yes, sort of. Theres a 35/40 ton heavy Japan did use and serviced. However I'm not allowed to share to you the details yet, its still private.

 

But Japan ignored heavies for the most part. They couldnt afford to mass produce them with their logistical errors and lack of resources. 

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Most of those resources went to the Imperial Navy, as I recall

 

It was a matter of internal warring  between political groups and the military. The Navy tended to get the better side of the higher ups and in result got major priority over the Army. 

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To be fair it was an Island country that had gotten by on blind luck/sheer incompetence of the enemy (not to say early war victories against the British weren't impressive feats, but the buck largely stops there, and further offensive actions into Burma turned into a real shitshow) when it came to ground battles (that mattered) and quick victories by sea

 

You shell anything enough its not gonna matter that you would take more casualties than necessary and it will take needlessly longer than a nation with more modern equipment and doctrine on the ground, its still going to be a win in the strategic sense, and the sea battle that made it happen mattered to Japan arguably more than any ground battle every will

 

Fact is dosent matter if the Japanese had assault rifles and main battle tanks if their fleet is still decimated, their commerce fleet bleed white, and their outposts outside the home islands are isolated.

 

A loss at sea has far reaching effects.

 

Sure the fact that American marines more often than not went up against a Japanese soldier with antiquated weaponry with and a inefficient at best and suicidal at worst chain of command helped, but what helped a hell of alot more is that 16 of his buddies died from the month long coastal bombardment, and 10 others starved to death or died of dysentery when everything but the clothes on their backs and weapons in their hands were lost in the mass retreat away from the devastating air and seaborne onslaught. 

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The two 47mm cannons used in the two frontal turrets were also modified to fit the armor layout of the tank. The weapon’s barrels were reinforced with steel to secure them to the tank, due to the standard gun not adequately fitting into the turret.

 

 

 

Could you elaborate on what this means?

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Nevertheless, the trials conducted at the testing field were considered to be a success, and the vehicle was deemed ready for use

 

This was the line that had me snickering the most. I wish this article had been around when that South African wierdo was claiming WG had fabricated literally everything in the Japanese heavy line. If I recall correctly, he claimed the surviving track link was from actually from a Liebherr mobile crane, tinfoil-hat style.  

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This was the line that had me snickering the most. I wish this article had been around when that South African wierdo was claiming WG had fabricated literally everything in the Japanese heavy line. If I recall correctly, he claimed the surviving track link was from actually from a Liebherr mobile crane, tinfoil-hat style.  

Links?

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I must be used to dealing with really epic levels of crazy, because that barely pinged my meter. Still sounds very much like a certain person I know IRL though.

 

Has he mentioned a pet theory regarding the holographic universe hypothesis?

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Sigh, at this rate, I may have to admit I was wrong about you if you keep making good, high effort posts like this.

 

In all seriousness, This is a great contribution.

Who are you and what have you done with the real Mech? :P

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Sigh, at this rate, I may have to admit I was wrong about you if you keep making good, high effort posts like this.

 

In all seriousness, This is a great contribution.

 

I appreciate the comment. However it took me over a week and half to translate everything [needed] from old kanji to english, and it has stressed me a good amount. So another article on this scale might not come up for some time. 

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​Since the article Soukou and Daigensui wrote long ago is filled with inconsistencies and errors, decided to make something thats actually accurate to the reports. Wrote it on Google Docs initially, posted it to WT earlier. Will be present on Ritas blog and eventually Wikipedia. 

 

 

Hello Waffentrager,

 

I am making my first post on these boards in concern to what you wrote in the quote above. "The article" must be implying a single article about Japanese heavy tanks which I will assume is the one I will link below.

 

http://ftr.wot-news.com/2013/11/19/superheavy-japanese-tanks/

 

First correction is that Daigensui had no involvement in "Superheavy Japanese Tanks." She contributed to the STB-1 article, not to "Superheavy Japanese Tanks."

 

Second correction, "to make something thats actually accurate to the reports" can be interpreted that the same sources were available when "Superheavy Japanese Tanks" was created. That is incorrect. "Superheavytanks" was posted in November 2013. Including the process of searching for and acquiring the books, the article was the result of many months of research. In respects to those materials, "Superheavy Japanese Tanks" attempted the most accurate and fair presentation possible out of materials that presented different interpretations.

 

What is changing what is now acknowledged as true history about the O-I are the materials you sourced below:

 

O-I documentation, Finemolds
O-I project report notebook 1,2,3,4,5, and 6 (Finemolds)
 
These documents were not available at the time. They only just became available in the Autumn/winter of 2015, about two years after "Superheavy Japanese Tanks." There was no way of knowing what and when such new information would be released.
 
What would have been fair to say is instead of "to make something thats actually accurate to the reports" but something to the effect of "upon the release of new information about the O-I".
 
Please do be more careful about how you reflect on previous work of others. Congratulations on your article.

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      Important Fig.11: Archive code C13120839500, Item 7
       
        “整備計画” is “Maintenance plan” in English, again it was PLAN! The whole plan was made in 1944-12-26. I don’t actually know how Waffentrager can misunderstand this, maybe he doesn’t even know Japanese or Chinese!
       

       
      Important Fig.12: The cover of the same archive, “昭和十九年十二月二十六日” is 1944-12-26” in English.
       
      I have other archives to prove that Ho-Ri were not finished as well:
       


       
      Important Fig. 13 and 14: Mitsubishi’s tank production chart made by the American survey team after the war ends.
       
        From the chart you can only find out Type 4 and Type 5 medium tanks’ record. There is no existence of Type 5 gun tank Ho-Ri, or the”M-5 Gun Tank” in the chart’s way.
       
        Except for the archives, many books written by Japanese also mentioned that Type 5 gun tank were not finished:
       

       
      Fig.15: Kunimoto’s record.
       
        “二〇年五月完成予定の五両の終戦時の工程進捗度は、やっと五〇パーセントであり、完成車両出せずに終戦となった。” In English it’s: “When the war ended, the five Ho-Ri planned to be finished in 1945-5 had finally reached 50% completion. No completed vehicle were made when the war ended.”
       
        Here is another book written by Japanese with the help of former IJA tank designer, Tomio Hara:
       

       
      Important Fig.16: Tomio Hara’s book
       
      “完成をみるには至らなかった” Again he emphasized that the tank was not finished. Also when Ho-Ri’s design was finished its combat weight was raised to 40 tons, not the planned 35 tons. It was only powered by one “Modified BMW watercooled V12 gasoline engine”, rated 550hp/1500rpm. In Waffentrager’s article he said later a Kawasaki 1100hp engine were installed, but obviously that’s none sense. There was really existed a Kawasaki 1100hp engine but that is the two BMW V12 engine(Same engine on Type 5 gun tank or Type 5 medium tank) combined together for Japanese super-heavy tank O-I use. It will take much more room which Ho-Ri do not have.
       

       
      Fig.17: O-I’s engine compartment arrangement. There’s no such room in Ho-Ri for this engine set.
       
        And last here are the other questions I asked
       

       
      Fig.18: Other questions I asked
       
        I have already talked about the questions regarding C13120839500 and the engine. As for the gun with 1005m/s muzzle velocity, the Japanese never planned to make the 105mm gun achieve such a high velocity because they don’t have the enough tech back then. Also from the archive C14011075200(important fig.4) the 105mm gun was designed only to reach about 900m/s.
       
        So, after all these, how did Waffentrager replied? I will post out the replies from my E-mail(because he deleted my replies on his blog).
       

       
      Fig.19: Waffentrager’s first reply
       
      He kept saying that my archive is not the same as his and he is using his own documents. I didn’t believe in these shit and I replied:
       

       
      Fig.20: My reply
       
        Last sentence, the Ho-Ri III he was talking about is fake. There are only Ho-Ri I(The one resembles the Ferdinand tank destroyer) and Ho-Ri II(The another one resembles the Jagdtiger tank destroyer). He even photoshoped a picture:
       

       
      Fig.21: Waffentrager’s fake Ho-Ri III
       

       
      Fig.22: The real Ho-Ri I and the base picture of Waffentrager’s photoshoped Ho-Ri III in Tomio Hara’s book. Many same details can be seen in Waffentrager's fake Ho-Ri III
       
        The 4 variants of up-armoured Type 3 Chi-Nu medium tank is also fake, I will post his original article and the confirmed facts I got from Mr.Taki by E-mail.
       

       
      Fig.23: 4 models of up-armoured Chi-Nu by Waffentrager
       

       
      Fig.24: Mr.Taki’s reply
       
        Waffentrager used every excuses he could get to refuse giving out the references, and finally he deleted my comments. What an asshole!
       

       
      Fig.25: Our last “conversation”
       

       
      Fig.26 He deleted my comment.
       
        So, as you can see, Waffentrager is really a dick. He is cheating everybody because he think that we can’t read Japanese. Anyway I still hope he could release his reference and documents to prove me wrong. After all, I’m not here to scold or argue with somebody, but to learn new things. Also if you guys have any questions about WWII(IJA) Japanese tanks, feel free to ask me, I’m happy to help.
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