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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/29/2021 in all areas

  1. The contract entails a lot more than just MELLS and the new situational awareness system (which is not really comparable to Iron Vision). It includes the integration of MELLS changes preparing the hull for the installation of the turret independent secondary weapon system (TSWA) improved optics with for gunner and commander (greater magnification, color daylight cameras) the addition of a situational awarness system consisting of ~11 daylight and thermal camera modules (Rheinmetall SCM 60) with sensor-fusion capability the integration of the improved IdZ-ES soldier system and the new BMS' (BMS SitaWare Frontline for the vehicle, SitaWare TacNet for the soldiers) new digital radios as part of the D-LBO program improvements to reliability and system stability integration of new soft- and hardware interfaces (NGVA compliant) for future upgrades changes to the hull in order to raise the GVW to 45 metric tons improvements to the MUSS softkill APS (not sure if this already means MUSS 2.0 will be adopted) spare parts, tools and maintenance a study regarding potential future changes/improvements/upgrades Slovenia wants to cooperate with Germany on the Boxer purchase.
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  2. T-14 going through some testing at 38th institute testing ground. Fuel drums mounted.
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  3. Virtual training for T-15 and Kurganets crews. Leo 2s, some sort of Abrahamanus, Bredleys, etc.
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  4. Unless you're Emeric, then it's a suppression study
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  5. Yeah, this is impossible. The closest you can approximate this is through pattern recognition software (which, incidentally, is how the postpross in your brain works), but that only works if there's a pattern to be followed. If you are looking at a patch of sky at a certain resolution, a computer can simulate a higher resolution in a way that's convincing to a human being. What it can't do is show you details that are below the native resolution level, like far away or low signature aircraft, for example.
    1 point
  6. Maximum angular resolution is a function of beam width. Beam width is a function of antenna size and operating wavelength. An AESA might be able to wring a slightly smaller beam width out of a given antenna size and a given wavelength, but it is still subject to these same limitations. It's fundamental physics; you see similar-looking equations if you look into the maximum focal range of laser weapons. L band is an order of magnitude longer wavelength than X band. Wing antennas are narrower than nose-mounted radars. This supposed "wing mounted L band AESA radar" is going to have less than a tenth the resolution of the nose radar. Computer signal processing do a much better job of finding useful signals. A more capable computer can find information that a weaker computer would have to throw away as noise. But there are information theoretic limits. Computers cannot create information that they weren't given in the first place. Computers aren't magical. They cannot improve the resolution of a grainy photo to show the face of the killer reflected in a raindrop. If a radar has a small antenna relative to its operating wavelength then its beam will be quite wide. If there are two targets within that beam width at the same distance moving at the same speed then there is no possible way that the computer will be able to tell whether it's one target or two. There simply is not enough information for the computer to dig through to find out what is going on. Likewise, if a radar has a wide beam and it's engaging a moving target, it is going to have a hard time figuring out where exactly in this wide beam the returns are coming from. It can move the beam around until it stops getting return signal, but the edge of a radar beam isn't a clean and abrupt end, and if the target is moving it won't be able to do this quickly enough to get a precise location anyway. These are fundamental problems with the amount of information that the antenna can provide the computer. The computer won't be able to fill in the blanks.
    1 point
  7. It's an Actively Electronically Scanned Array (AESA), but that does not mean it is a radar. AESA is just a type of antenna, it doesn't necessarily mean it's a radar antenna. It could be a transmit-only antenna, or a receive-only antenna. It can't be a radar. Or if it were, it would be the world's most singularly useless radar. This isn't a matter of experience or design finesse, this is a matter of fundamental radar antenna physics. That is not a large enough antenna relative to the wavelength it's operating in. It is almost certainly an IFF system, but one that uses an AESA. The way IFF works is that the aircraft with the IFF system gets pinged by a radar, and the radar sends a coded interrogation signal. The aircraft that receives this signal sends back a coded response, which identifies it to friendly forces. The problem with this for a stealthy jet is that the IFF system is broadcasting radio waves, which is decidedly un-stealthy and could allow any radar with a passive seeker mode to get a bearing fix on the aircraft. The solution Sukhoi is using here is an AESA IFF system. Instead of a regular antenna, the response IFF signals are transmitted through the AESA, which allows it to confine the signal to a very narrow beam. AESA has extremely high gain and very small sidelobes, so it can make the IFF beam much narrower than a conventional antenna. That makes it much less likely that an enemy eavesdropper will detect these signals and use them to locate the PAK-FA.
    1 point
  8. Is graceful like swan, but also asshole like goose.
    0 points
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