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N-L-M

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About N-L-M

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  1. I propose assuming the hardness of the RHA, as given, is flavor text, And that the TE and ME don't change.
  2. I'm pretty sure all the IDF Tirans were disposed of by the mid 80s, with the introduction of the Merkava 1 and 2 displacing them. It was approximately at this time that some of the Tiran 4s and 5s were converted to Achzarit HAPCs, as they were no longer needed as gun tanks. The powerpack change done on the Achzarits requires a significantly raised roof, I don't think it's workable on the original hull height. AFAIK the IDF never went that far with the 115mm. A very significant portion of the captured ammo was lost in a warehouse fire, which led to the fairly quick retireme
  3. Remember that the submissions are measured by the judges not only against the specification but also against the other competitors. Features which are included or excluded will be judged on their merits as part of a cohesive whole.
  4. Not a practical proposition, really. You'll get a naturally vs artificially aged condition if you let it sit around for a while without messing with it any more, which for some precipitation hardened metals can be around halfway to the full artificial age. That's quite the "if". And even if you *do*, there are a few reasons. Fabrication efficiency, cost, repairs, and the like all come to mind.
  5. While this is true, the solution heat treat is above that temperature, and everything should dissolve. Forming the wrong precipitates is an issue if you age wrong or if you accidentally age via heat input such as welding later in the process. welding itself is also an issue for precipitation hardened metals if done post-age as it remelts the HAZ had effectively solutionizes it, of course. This is what causes 6061, for example, to lose so much of its strength in the HAZ.
  6. Per The spec sheet, Aermet is a brand name for a Maraging steel. So like all* solution heat treat and age alloys, it should be capable of said reset. *In certain alloys and geometries the reset is not possible as the solution heat treat and quench cause cracking.
  7. Why is the image for the last,most relevant bit, cut in half? The paranoid amongst us would suspect we're being had by a bait-and-switch. Even if we assume that weight includes a factored-in Trophy system just in case it's fitted, that's still only around 2.5-3 tons including the ballast on the turret front (which is effectively built in on the M1A2C). Where is all the extra weight coming from, if we assume this is genuine?
  8. I think it has to do with the drive sprockets meshing with the end connectors, which are also the guide teeth. You'd need an all new incompatible concept of track link design to fill both those functions while also being wider. Such a concept is the track with central guide teeth used on the HVSS Shermans.
  9. That entire site of yours is an absolute goldmine. I even got my profile pic from there.
  10. Ideally, using the AMPV hull, which also has mine protection improvements and a revised internal layout among others. But on the whole, if you're sticking with a "medium weight" IFV, you could do much worse than a Brad derivative with a RWS 30mm (especially one that's already in service!) and the improvement offered by newer options like the Lynx may not be a sufficient gain to justify their cost. With the AMPV, latest M109s, and the like, the US Army is committed to the Bradley automotive components for the next 40 years or so. Makes sense to me to at least try and leverage that.
  11. Maraging steels in general are low carbon, as they do not get their strength from carbon distorting the lattice but rather from metallic precipitates like Ni3Mo. Carbon is in fact not desired in Maraging steels. For the Maraging steel to work properly you need a minimum of 19% Ni, which is very expensive, but you get what you pay for.
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