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Beer

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  1. Tank You
    Beer reacted to LoooSeR in Terror Attacks and Active Shooter Events Thread   
    Aslan Byutukaev and 5 other terrorists from his gang were killed during special operation in Chechnya by Chechen forces and National Guard. Aslan orginised suicide attack on Demodedovo airport about 10 years ago. 
     
     
  2. Funny
    Beer reacted to LoooSeR in Movie tanks and terrible Vismods   
    Flacid Tiger

  3. Tank You
    Beer reacted to Cleb in Kimchi armoured vehicles: K1, K2, K21 and other AFVs from Worse Korea   
    The various flavors of upgunned K200s
     

     
  4. Tank You
    Beer reacted to Stimpy75 in Turkish touch   
    some pics




  5. Tank You
    Beer reacted to Laser Shark in The Small Arms Thread, Part 8: 2018; ICSR to be replaced by US Army with interim 15mm Revolver Cannon.   
    U.S. Ordnance M2A2N with the new HMG-M softmount from Rheinmetall Norway. It will replace the older .50 cals (the oldest ones are from 1940) in the Norwegian Armed Forces.
     

  6. Funny
    Beer reacted to LoooSeR in Non-exploding infantry hardware thread.   
    Night vision in old times... Starlight sight on top of modern rifle

  7. Tank You
    Beer reacted to SuperComrade in The Yakovlev VTOL Family   
    I don't think you will get better info than what is in this book, at least in English

    http://avxhome.se/ebooks/history_military/YakovlevJumpJets.html
  8. Tank You
    Beer reacted to LostCosmonaut in The Yakovlev VTOL Family   
    During the latter part of the Cold War, the Yakovlev design bureau came up with quite a few designs for VTOL combat aircraft. While they weren't the most successful designs, they are pretty interesting, from both a historical and technical standpoint.
     
    The first of these is the Yak-36 (Freehand);
     

     
    While the Soviets had come up with numerous other VTOL designs in the 1960s, most of them used dedicated vertically mounted engines to take off vertically. However, the Yak-36 had a more modern arrangement, with two engines that used vectored thrust for both vertical and horizontal flight. The Yak-36 was powered by a pair of R27-300 jet engines (the same engines that powered the MiG-23 'Faithless' VTOL concept). In addition to providing vertical and horizontal thurst, the engines also provided airflow for 'puffers' at the wingtips, nose, and tail, which provided control in hover and low speeds (where aerodynamic controls would not be effective).
     
    The Yak-36 suffered from various difficulties during its development, among them the engines reingesting exhaust gases. At least two of the prototypes crashed at somepoint. Though the Yak-36 was at various points displayed with underwing armaments (such as rocket pods), it was never deployed to operational units; it was solely used as a testbed.
     
    Following the Yak-36 was the more widely known Yak-38 (Forger). It entered service in the early 1980s.
     

     
    Unlike the Yak-36, the Yak-38 was fitted with lift jets (two RD-36V engines). Though these engines did an adequate job of providing vertical lift, they had the drawback of being dead weight in horizontal flight. Horizontal thrust was provided by  a single R27-300. Though the Yak-38 was capable of VTOL, it had highly limited performance; it was strictly subsonic, and had marginal payload capability.
     

    (pictured: unrestrained optimism)
     
    The Yak-38 was designed from the outset as a combat aircraft, intended to be deployed from the Soviets' Kiev class carriers. In this role, it was shit (much like your favorite anime). The first issue was reliability; many of the Forger's components proved to be horrendously unreliable, especially the lift jets. I've seen figures stating that the lift jets had an average lifetime of less than 25 hours, which leads me to suspect they were actually rebranded Jumo 004s. Engine failures were especially bad in the Yak-38 - a failure of a lift jet on one side would lead to the jet entering a fast, unrecoverable roll. The lift jets also had poor thrust in hot conditions; in many cases, the Yak-38 had to fly with only two pylons filled, rather than all four. Considering that the Yak-38 had no internal armament, this was not optimal. Interestingly, in addition to using it as a carrier aircraft, the Soviets also trialed the Yak-38 as a close air support in Afghanistan. This was less than successful; the Yak-38 was only capable of carrying a pair of 100kg bombs, markedly inferior to dedicated CAS aircraft such as the Su-25.
     
    Rumors of the Yak-38 being deployed to Colorado are false;
     

     
    Numerous variants of the Yak-38 were developed, most notably the Yak-38M, which despite having improved engines and other components, was still a dog. There was also the Yak-38U, a serious contender for the title of 'Ugliest Airplane'.
     
     
    In the late 1970s, development of a successor to the Yak-38 began. This aircraft was the Yak-41 (Freestyle).
     

     
    The general configuration of the Yak-41 was similar to the Yak-38, with a pair of lift jets in the fuselage and a single main engine for thrust. However, its capabilities were massively improved. While the Yak-38 was a strictly subsonic aircraft, the Yak-41 was capable of supersonic flight, setting many records for VTOL aircraft (under the fictional designation Yak-141). Additionally, it incorporated far more advanced materials in its structure (including large scale use of composites), as well as improved avionics (such as a radar set which was actually useful). Its payload capacity, in terms of weight, was roughly the same as what the Yak-38 could (theoretically) carry. However, given that the Yak-41 was a dedicated air superiority craft, this was less of a concern than the Yak-38s payload deficiency in the strike role.
     

     
    Unfortunately for the Yak-41, it began testing in the late 1980s, just as the Soviet Union was falling apart. Though some testing continued through the early 90s, the Yak-41 never entered operational service. The second nail in the Yak-41s coffin was the Soviet Union / Russian Federation's acquisition of larger aircraft carrier(s), capable of operating aircraft such as the Su-27K and MiG-29K.
     
    Interestingly, for a few years in the early 1990s, Yakovlev collaborated with Lockheed Martin on the development of the Yak-41. This has given rise to many conspiracies about the F-35B being a clone of the Yak-41. While this is obviously false, it wouldn't be outside the realm of possibility that a few bits on the JSF might have drawn inspiration from Yak's design in some way.
     
    There was one final successor to the Yak-41; the Yak-43. An even more advanced evolution, the Yak-43 could have been quite capable (had it been built). From what I can find, it dispensed with the extraneous lift jets. Power would have been provided by a modified NK-32 turbofan, the same engine that powers the Tu-160. This would have given the Yak-43 significantly improved performance and payload capacity compared to its predecessors. Additionally, the Yak-43 would have incorporated low observability features into its design, bringing it closer to being a true competitor to aircraft such as the F-35B. In any case, the aircraft remained unbuilt, and I have not heard of any efforts to revive the design.
     

     

     
     
  9. Tank You
    Beer reacted to Collimatrix in The Yakovlev VTOL Family   
    Lift jet installation in the YAK-38
  10. Tank You
    Beer reacted to MoritzPTK in Lets talk Fire Control Systems (FCS)   
    German PDF about the OPHELIOS thermal imager used on PERI of Leopard 2:
     
     
  11. Tank You
    Beer reacted to SH_MM in Lets talk Fire Control Systems (FCS)   
    Puma's ATTICA via Otvaga2004:
  12. Tank You
    Beer reacted to LoooSeR in General cars and vehicles thread.   
  13. Tank You
    Beer reacted to LoooSeR in The Soviet Tank Thread: Transversely Mounted 1000hp Engines   
    AFV storage areas.
       Somewhere in Siberia:

     
     
       Far East:

     
     
  14. Tank You
    Beer reacted to LoooSeR in General artillery, SPGs, MLRS and long range ATGMs thread.   
    Iranian IRGC Aerospace forces exercises. Cool footage of their SRBM/MRBM (stolen from Yuri Lyamin's LJ)
     
     

     
     
       Launches of Dezful and Zolfaghar missiles, which have guided warhead.

     
     

       Warhead part
     
     
  15. Tank You
    Beer reacted to LoooSeR in ATGMs and RPGs for infantry - a thread for rebels around the world to choose their ATGM supplier.   
    Best Korea new grenade launcher

     
     
  16. Tank You
    Beer reacted to LoooSeR in The Small Arms Thread, Part 8: 2018; ICSR to be replaced by US Army with interim 15mm Revolver Cannon.   
    NK "OICW"

     
       Other pew pewers
     
  17. Metal
    Beer got a reaction from DIADES in Land 400 Phase 3: Australian IFV   
    How is it supposed to work? 
     
     
    That's purely secondary property and hardly a reason to carry it. The reason for slat armor existence is increase of surivability for the cost of extra weight, ridiculous dimensions, worse driving performance and harder accessability of most of the vehicle area. However it works only against very old HEAT grenades and only sometimes. It doesn't work against ATGM and newer RPGs at all (even against pretty old ones like RPG-18). When the vehicle is equipped with APS, which can deal with all those threats much better, there is no reason to diminish its performance by adding the cage. 
  18. Tank You
    Beer reacted to Boagrius in The Whirlybird Thread   
    Looks like it is now official: Tiger is out and Apache (Guardian) is in for the Australian Army.

    https://www.minister.defence.gov.au/minister/lreynolds/media-releases/future-ready-strengthening-armys-armed-reconnaissance-capability
  19. Tank You
    Beer reacted to heretic88 in General Mechanised Equipment   
    Yep, this is a crazy good vehicle! I read about it a while ago in an article, if I remember well, it said only a few were built. These are very very useful vehicles. It has one disadvantage, it needs a trailer to quickly transport it to the site, but this is countered by its speed and maneuverability offroad. SPOT-55 proved its capabilities many times. In my opinion, it is much better to transform old and obsolete tanks to such vehicles than to scrap them. ARVs, and even bridgelayers are also especially useful in civilian roles.
     
    A private firm here in hungary also operates some ex military vehicles, among them a quite exotic one, a BAT-M. It is actually the last of its kind here in working condition. Back then in 2014, it was waiting its fate of scrapping, when someone from the firm noticed it on a scrapyard. They bought the vehicle and totally restored it.


     
     
  20. Tank You
    Beer got a reaction from Stimpy75 in General Mechanised Equipment   
    When You posted this vehicle... do you know guys this thing? It's firefighting tank SPOT-55 based on T-55 chassis and produced by VOP-25 factory (now only VOP) in Czechoslovakia since 1991 (and Czechia after 1993 split). This tank has been in active use in basically every major fire in our country (forest fires, ammo dump accidents, chemical and ammo plant accidents etc.). It's big advantage is that it's optionally manned and can be operated remotely up to 1500 meters from the operator. Unfotunately I don't know how many were built but at least two are also in Saxony, Germany. 
     
    Technical data and many photos here (use google translate).
     
      
  21. Tank You
    Beer got a reaction from Lord_James in General Mechanised Equipment   
    When You posted this vehicle... do you know guys this thing? It's firefighting tank SPOT-55 based on T-55 chassis and produced by VOP-25 factory (now only VOP) in Czechoslovakia since 1991 (and Czechia after 1993 split). This tank has been in active use in basically every major fire in our country (forest fires, ammo dump accidents, chemical and ammo plant accidents etc.). It's big advantage is that it's optionally manned and can be operated remotely up to 1500 meters from the operator. Unfotunately I don't know how many were built but at least two are also in Saxony, Germany. 
     
    Technical data and many photos here (use google translate).
     
      
  22. Tank You
    Beer reacted to heretic88 in General Mechanised Equipment   
    Sheremetevo airport received a brand new ARV, which is actually the civilian version of the BREM-80U. Very nice!

     


  23. Tank You
    Beer reacted to David Moyes in CV-90, why so much love ?   
    CV9035NL MLU

     




    Hi-Res Version

     
  24. Tank You
    Beer reacted to LoooSeR in Ukrainian armor - Oplot-M, T-64M Bulat and other.   
    This is just great... from otvaga:
     
     
  25. Tank You
    Beer reacted to Cleb in Kimchi armoured vehicles: K1, K2, K21 and other AFVs from Worse Korea   
    K808 30mm SPAAG variant
     

     
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