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Found 4 results

  1. Liquid fluorine has great potential as a rocket fuel; per the Encyclopedia Astronautica, LF2/LH2 has a specific impulse of 470 seconds. http://www.astronautix.com/l/lf2lh2.html Lithium/LF2/LH2 can get you over 500 seconds, but requires you to have molten lithium at over 450K stored near cryogenic liquid hydrogen. Krypton difluoride (KrF2) is a compound with some interesting properties, aside from being a noble gas compound. Annoyingly, it breaks apart at temperatures above about 195K. More importantly for the purpose of using it as a rocket propellant, it is an incredibly strong ox
  2. I found a bunch of my chemical engineering texts that I had PDFs for. I put them on my Google drive, so if anybody is interested, here's a few links. Let me know of if these links actually work. I've been reading through my Reactor Chemistry text when I have downtime at work. Glad I finally am getting around to reading it. Introduction to Engineering Ethics Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering, fourth edition Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer Numerical Methods for Engine
  3. For 115, 117, and 118 Moscovium, Tennessine, and Oganesson 115 sounds good (Moscovium), 118 is kinda bad, 117 is a linguistic atrocity. Also, lol at the typo in the article picture.
  4. Plutonium, in addition to being radioactive and fissile, has some rather exotic physical properties that make it... shall we say, exciting, to work with. One of these is that, like uranium, plutonium is pyrophoric. That is, it burns spontaneously on contact with air. The greater the surface area of the plutonium, the faster it burns. This makes the management of the metal shaving from any machining operations critical. In addition, plutonium has six solid allotropes, and they vary wildly in density: Finally, and unusually, plutonium contracts when it freezes. It's rathe
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