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Competition: A modern medium AFV


Toxn
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I'm really bad at alloys and such, but would anyone know off the top of their head how your average modern aluminum armor alloy would compare to RHA, specifically in terms of thickness?  My impression is they're fairly close, with the main difference here being aluminum is a fair bit less dense.  I'm guessing density is roughly 2.6-2.8 g/cm3, compared to 7.84 g/cm3 for RHA steel.  Googling this all right now, but I said earlier, I'm bad@alloys

 

I figure if the thickest armor on the hull is going to be ~50mm RHAe, aluminum should work.

 

 

But yeah, while I still need to calculate the weight, this will be able to fit into a C-130 if you take off the tracks.  Otherwise, it's both too tall and too wide (if you include the panoramic sight).  I have no idea how I did this so perfect.

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FINAL SUBMISSION

 

ROOIBAADJE INDUSTRIES PRESENTING:

 

The "Slimme" AFV!

j2eVmLd.jpg

Dimensions:

Length: 5230 mm 

Width: 3160 mm

Height: 2346 mm

 

Crew:

Commander

Driver

Gunner/Loader

 

Armament:

1 autoloading smoothbore 120 mm mortar

1 Bushmaster III 35 mm autocannon

1 dual Spike-ER launcher

 

Protection:

High hardness steel hull body with Relikt ERA on hull front and sides.

 

Effective KE thickness of the steel body:

Glacis: 483 mm 

Lower glacis: 157 mm

Side hull: 37 mm

Top hull: 37 mm

Hull floor: 37 mm

 

Weights:

Unstowed weight: 34.33 tons

Combat weight: 36.65 tons

 

And because I'm slightly lazy:

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Hull weight is slightly inaccurate because that Excel sheet cannot into sponsons. I'm also quite sceptical of the suspension weight.

 

Contact area tracks

Solid ground: 3000x540 mm

Soft ground: ~3515x540 mm

 

Power pack and final drive:

Engine: MT 881 Ka-500 (1000 bhp)

Transmission: Renk HSWL 256

 

Layout:

0d55750e87.png

In the front the engine and transmission, with below it the 800 liter fuel tank which doubles as protection against shaped charges from mines and IEDs. Behind that the mortar with its autoloader and 70 shell ammorack (including propellant). And last but not least, the crew compartment with a dimension of (LxWxH) 1400x2000x1300 mm.

 

The 'inspiration' for this whole idea is the ever increasing accuracy of indirect fire weapons due to the development of guided shells. Instead of going for an AFV with a medium caliber cannon I went with a 120 mm mortar since there are guided 120 mm mortar shells. Right now GPS guided rounds should be available and semi active laser guided shells are in development. The fire control system will receive the targeting data from a drone carried by the vehicle, from other vehicles (like the current BMP-4) or other sources. This allows the vehicle to hit things at pretty incredible distances. Even though the mortar itself is shorter than normal mortars, it should still have a range of close to 10 km (A full length 120 mm mortar has a maximum range of 15 km with the use of guided shells). The RCWS in the form of a Samson Mk.2 turret is more or less back-up, although both weapon systems in the turret are still very capable weapons. When engaging armour at a distance (4000+ m) both the mortar and the Spike ER ATGMs are capable of engaging the target. But in the case of the Spike missiles only when there is a clear line of sight.

 

To elaborate a bit more on the choice for a mortar, it gives the vehicle a lot more flexibility. With the use of guided shells a reverse slope can be hit, which is challenging if not outright impossible with a normal mortar. A smoothbore mortar might give a lower firing accuracy than a rifled mortar, but that doesn't matter since the guided shells will compensate for that. And since it's smoothbore, it can fire shape stabilised shells (read: HEAT). Which, with a proper guidance system, will give it anti-armour capabilities versus almost everything. Since the mortar can fire straight up it can be employed in whatever position the vehicle fits. This allows the mortar to be employed in really close quarters combat, since the guidance package can direct the shell to, literally, the enemy next door.

 

If the mortar will not be able to lay down fire quick enough on LOS targets, the 35 mm can be employed. While the anti-armour capabilities of the 35 mm APFSDS aren't impressive versus heavily armoured vehicles, it can still do the job versus lightly armoured vehicles like APCs, IFVs and recon vehicles. The anti-personel capabilities of the 35 mm KETF (Kinetic Energy Time Fused) rounds are certainly very impressive.

 

The vehicle's V-hull will protect the underside against buckling due to the pressure of mines or IEDs. The minimum ground clearance is 416 mm with the maximum clearance being 592 mm. This, combined with a 25 mm thick floor plate should be enough to withstand most of the mines and IEDs. The fuel tank of the vehicle is placed underneath the engine and in front of the autoloader for the mortar. This fuel tank doubles as protection versus shaped charges. 

 

The sloped 100 mm front hull is capable of stopping all modern autocannons and some older tank cannons. With the addition of Relikt ERA it should be capable of defeating modern long rod penetrators and HEAT warheads. The turret is rated lower, at STANAG IV, which protects it against small arms fire and shrapnel. But since the vehicle should stay out of LOS combat with AFVs and since the main weapon is hidden inside the hull its protection value is sufficient. The Samson Mk.2 RCWS allows reloading from inside the vehicle, so when reloading the Spike launcher and/or autocannon, the loader is safe. The RCWS itself has no components inside the hull. If need be, it can be changed to a different make or model.

 

The drone can be man-operated, but can also be given instructions, which it will execute by itself. The drone can, for example, be told to hold 1000 meters in front of the vehicle. Whenever the vehicle moves, the drone will move as well, always staying 1000 meters in front of the vehicle. This allows the commander to keep all their attention at communications, looking for targets or whatever it is what commanders do, instead of having to worry about flying a drone.

 

If there is one thing this vehicle excels at, it's messing whatever up whatever ground target it sees without the target ever seeing the vehicle. Because last time I checked, you couldn't see through sand, rocks, buildings, etc.

 

Yes, I know the swing arms point the wrong way.

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thanks bronze from making it not be a double post for me, but I'm doing some number crunching right now to figure out the weight.  I might not be done within the hour since I've got some other writing too, but writing is pretty much all that's left (and it ain't fancy)

 

 

Had to leave for a bit to deal with someone, then backed out of (and lost) my post.  I've got all the info I need, so I just have to type it again

Edited by ApplesauceBandit
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If you were wondering the weight distribution on my sketch super-FV 101, its like the same as the FV 101 with a slightly heavier turret and frontal hull(+.5 ton & +.75-1 ton each, give or take). I looked but couldn't find the individual weights for things though. I know, its sad and pathetic. Here's a Ogorkiewicz booklet on the FV 101 though. 

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LCARV (Light Combat Armored Reconnaissance Vehicle)

Final submission

 

 

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Specifications

---------------------------------

 

General

    • 2 crew (driver, commander/gunner)

    • Target designation system to help fill role of gunner

    • Aluminum alloy armor supplemented with composite armor and conventional steel

 

Mobility

    • Approx. 20 tons combat loaded (without armor packages)

    • 600 bhp diesel or 660 bhp diesel

    • 0.45m ground clearance

    • 0.45 kg/cm2 ground pressure, zero penetration

    • 4.4 cm2 total ground contact area

 

Protection (without armor package)

    • STANAG IV protection from sides and rear

    • STANAG VI protection frontally

    • Hull floor and crew seats optimized for protection against mines and IEDs

    • Bulkheads, fuel, and engine provide additional protection to crew.

    • Turret design fully protects crew while hull down

 

Firepower

    • 60mm smoothbore autocannon

    • 1 coaxial MG

    • -9°/+30° gun elevation

    • 99 cannon rounds on board.  75 in automated carousel system, 24 ready

    • Programmable (single or 3 round burst, 230 maximum burst RPM, shot placement, ammo)

    • HE with airburst capability, APFSDS

 

Minimum size (tracks on)

    • 2.4m height, 6.2m length, 3m width

   

Size with armor package, fenders, and cameras

    • 2.8m height, 6.4m length, 3.3m width

    • Armor package not available for air transit

 

Other systems

    • 8 smoke dischargers mounted on turret

    • Modular panoramic camera system for commander

    • Target designation and tracking abilities, greatly decreasing workload of commander during gunnery

    • Automatic fire suppression systems

    • Mounting area over barrel for a variety of equipment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designed by Little Caesar's Enterprises, Inc. the LCARV is a novel design for rapidly delivering formidable firepower wherever it's needed.  

 

 

Mobility:

 

With its small size and weighing just under 20 tons, the LCARV is able to be deployed from an AC-130 in a combat ready state.  Its relatively low weight and ground pressure allow superb mobility over unfavorable terrain, and its powerful engine provides it with greater speed than most other tracked vehicles.  In many ways, this LCARV is a spiritual successor of the RDF/LT, taking advantages of the latest improvements in technology and the changing face of war.

 

The LCARV shares many parts with the M3 Bradely IFV, most notably the tracks, wheels, and various automotive components.  

 

I6IEJ1t.png

 

 

Protection:

 

In order to keep the weight low enough for air transport, armor-grade aluminum was chosen for protection, supplemented in vital areas with highly effective composite armors.  In certain areas, conventional steel armor was used as well.  The frontal placement of the engine, transmission, and fuel also improve the crew's visibility with little to no increase in weight.  Beyond creating more material to protect the crew, land mines and IEDs are also more likely to direct most of the blow in the unoccupied portion of the vehicle.  The low profile turret, reminiscent of prior projects, allows the LCARV to fire from a hull-down position while keeping the screw fully concealed.  The ribbed armor on the front hull acts very similarly to the legendary S Tank, but with an even better 83° slope to counter more modern ammunition.

 

Various packages are available, utilizing NERA, composites, ceramics, and modern APS systems.  The goal of these is to greatly improve protection against various autocannons, ATGMs, and conventional shaped charge warheads for higher intensity conflicts.

 

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(Frontal coverage of armor pack shown)

 

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Firepower:

 

The main gun is a modified version of the 60mm HMVS by Oto Melera.  The gun is dual feed, allowing the commander to select between firing APFSDS or HE.  The autoloading system pulls the ammunition from the automated carousel at the floor of the turret basket, up into the feeding system to be ready to fire.  The main gun ammunition uses combustible cartridges, with experiments currently taking place with telescoping ammunition as well.  The current projectiles are identical to what is used in the Italian HMVS.  A machine gun is mounted coaxially to the main gun.

 

The 60mm round was chosen for its versatility.  Not only is it able to defeat certain older MBTs frontally in some situations, it is also able to effectively use programmable fuzes that would not be possible with smaller calibers.  The 60mm HVMS from Israel and Italy also provide us with a more tried and tested design. 

 

bWIeYZH.png

 

 

Miscellaneous:

 

A modular panoramic sight for the commander is located at the highest point on the vehicle, removing any potential blindspots.  The LCARV uses target tracking and designation system similar to what may be found on other modern AFVs, allowing the commander to be much more efficient.  After a target is designated, the systems is able to track up to four targets at once, firing on them automatically when ready.

 

 

Additionally, doors at the rear of the vehicle serve both as emergency exits for the crew, and to dramatically ease the process of reloading the carousel.  The turret is slightly sunken into the hull of the vehicle, decreasing the chances of a stray round or fragment jamming the turret.  The turret ring diameter is shared with the M551 Sheridan as well.

 

 

In terms of function, the LCARV outperforms the Bradley in mobility, protection, and firepower in exchange for its ability to carry troops.  The superb mobility and small profile make the LCARV ideal for scouting roles.  With armor packages, the LCARV is able to fill a more direct combat role.  Very few vehicles on the battle field outside of an MBT would be able to beat it in firepower and make its protection irrelevant, while still performing recon roles as well the next day.  In short, you would be hard-pressed to find a more versatile combat vehicle.

 

 

 

Some numbers:

 

Just like my tank crush, the HSTV-L, the thing I made is 95" in height
Absolute height (tracks to panoramic sight) is 109"

Length (end of tracks on either side) is 244"
Length (end of rear tow to front applique) 254"

Width (hull edge to edge) is 81"
Width (armor skirts) is 126"
Width (outer track edges) is 119"
Width (track center-center) is 102"

Track contact length: 164"
Track width is 21"
Total contact area: 6888"sq
Track ratio wizardry: 1.61

 

15mm front "roof", 44mm UFP, 51mm "turret guard," and 63mm LFP in RHA provide ~110mm RHAe.  63mm turret face also provides that.  Sides and rear at 38mm RHAe I think should stop 14.5mm API.  With some of the new fancy 7xxx series alloys that have been showing up, I think that's possible under 20 tons.

 

 

 

 

Unofficial side notes:

Using RHA to calculate armor weight, the hull came out at about 8.7 tons.  The armor weight (and weight in general) involved a lot of guesswork, and it could most certainly be less than what I've estimated.  

 

I seriously did not expect this to be a carbon copy of HSTV-L, which probably sounds like hogwash considering how much I like it and the other RDF/LT stuff.  Stuff like the weight, turret, being carried by C-130 then having applique to add more armor, 2 man crew (alright, some had 3 as well), and probably other stuff.  The height (without the panoramic camera) is even the same as the HSTV-L, down to the inch.  Seriously though, beyond the general looks biasing me, the rest wasn't planned.

 

Apparently a 60mm gun was trialed alongside the 75mm ARES by the US, but that could be the pasta gun or the jew gun.

 

 

Some things may not be perfectly to scale.  Ammo, gun, tracks, and other vital stuff like that was checked.

 

In my defence, it's still May 5th for the next few hours.

 

I forgot how to render in ortho, plus I'm lazy, so I think there's only one actual render there

 

TX0Ns0b.jpg

 

 

Edit for hull down picture and armor coverage picture, forgot to mention steel.  Typos, format issues, and incorrect numbers were corrected.

 

Edit 2:o fuk I only had a drive wheel on one side.  Thankfully, that's only visible in two of those pictures, one where it's a meaningful mistake.  Too lazy to remake the multiview, but the first render is fixed.  Typo in side notes corrected

Edited by ApplesauceBandit
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   When final list of submissions will be ready, me, or somebody else should make a big post with links to submissions (like my previous post), and repost them in spoilers (if they will work), in the end - quote original requirements and plane dimensions/size from early pages (1st, 2nd and 3rd AFAIK). 

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Original specs:

STURGEON'S NOTE: THIS IS JUST FOR FUN, DON'T TAKE IT TOO SERIOUSLY.

 

Toxn's note: what he said. The in-character stuff is just to reflect how these sorts of proposals end up getting bloated all out of proportion as conflicting requirements get tacked on by committees. I'll also try to provide clarity on the requirements themselves as we go along, so ask away.

 

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With a slew of regional conflicts threatening to metastasise and military expenditure rising for the first time in decades, military planners are once again pondering the role of AFVs on the modern battlefield. Recent conflicts seem to indicate that armed forces may be faced with lengthy conflicts in urban and peri-urban areas - places where tight confines and large numbers of anti-tank weapons have resulted in attritional warfare. In other areas, more open terrain has favoured the use of man-portable ATGMs against armoured elements. Finally, there has been a long-standing trend towards the use of IEDs and, on the other end of the scale, ever more sophisticated autonomous and semi-autonomous platforms as methods for inflicting casualties upon mechanised and armour forces.

 

These aspects, when combined with a long-standing trend towards more heavily armed and armoured IFV variants, have potentially created a niche for a class of AFV optimised for general combat rather than specific anti-armour or scouting operations. This class of AFV should ideally be air-transportable or air-deployable using existing transport aircraft, be capable of high mobility and survival against infantry-borne weapons, and should be capable of tackling other armed vehicles (up to and including AFVs of a similar configuration) as well as providing infantry support. Other considerations would include the use of the chassis as a basis for a number of specialised variants, the ability to upgrade and retrofit the design during its life cycle and, of course, the cost of the vehicles themselves.

 

As the head of a design team working within a massive defence conglomerate, your task is to come up with a design to pitch to defence departments around the globe. Your basic requirements are as follows:

  • Must be capable of protecting against small arms from all aspects, and must be capable of withstanding 20-30mm autocannon fire across the frontal arc.
  • Must be capable of engaging and defeating existing AFV designs (not including modern MBTs) at modern combat ranges.
  • Must be air-transportable using existing transport aircraft (preferably AC-130 or equivalent) in either a ready-to-run or partially disassembled state.
  • Must be capable of defending against at least one strike by man-portable anti-tank weapons, including ATGMs
  • Must include weaponry or equipment for engaging with dug-in infantry in urban areas
  • Must be capable of defending against mines, roadside bombs and IEDs
  • Must be highly reliable, including servicing at local depots.
  • Must cost the same or less than equivalent systems (around $4 million per unit maximum)
  • Must be capable of off-road travel

Finally, the design must use, wherever possible, existing components and processes in order to minimise development time. As our company specialises in armour arrays (including composites and the like) and electronics, some leeway will be allowed in terms of the armour package and electronic systems. Our extensive contacts within the defence sector mean that any weapon system currently being developed or fielded may plausibly be integrated with our product.

 

Advanced requirements are as follows:

  • May be capable of surviving multiple hits by heavy autocannon (40-60mm) across the frontal arc
  • May be capable of engaging low-flying aircraft and helicopters
  • May be directly air-deployable from existing transport aircraft
  • May be capable of surviving multiple strikes from anti-tank missiles (of all classes) from any angle
  • May include only COTs components
  • May be capable of being serviced in the field.
  • May be in the form of a family of vehicles sharing a common chassis
  • May cost significantly less than equivalent systems (under $3 million per unit)
  • May be capable of extreme off-road travel, including across anti-tank ditches and the like

 

Designs, including at least a picture, description and list of attributes, should be presented by the end of April 2016 for evaluation by a panel of experts. The winning design team will receive a small prize (cash and in-game currency for one of a number of games discussed on this forum) and the adulation of millions of imaginary fans.

 

Good luck!

 

Cargo aircraft compartment sizes:

 

c-130-cargodims.gif

 

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   Submissions:

I don't think Xoon ever got finished, which is a shame.  Looking forward to seeing Xoon's work in the next competition!

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   Submissions (final):

 

 

FINAL VERSION

CARACAL MMEV

A MEDIUM TANK FOR THE MODERN AGE

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THE HONDENAAIER INDUSTRIES, LTD. CARACAL MEDIUM MULTIPURPOSE EXPEDITIONARY VEHICLE

Hondenaaier Ind., Ltd. is proud to present its new design for a revolutionary medium weight vehicle. The CARACAL tank meets every need for a rapid deployment expeditionary vehicle for infantry support, long range fire, anti-tank missions, counter-insurgency warfare, and conventional engagements. The CARACAL tank sports a combination of all-around armor, devastating firepower, and great speed that makes it one of the most well-balanced and relentlessly effective vehicles ever designed.

CARACAL MEDIUM MULTIPURPOSE EXPEDITIONARY VEHICLE


SPECIFICATIONS

CRvCMSN.png

Crew: 3 (Driver, Gunner, Commander
Engine: MTU 871 Ka-501 1200 shp, 2,600 RPM
Cylinder displacement: 3.97 l
Total displacement: 31.7 l
Transmission: Allison X1100-3B, option for HMPT-1000 CVT
Suspension: Torsion bar, fully compatible with M2/M3 Bradley
Width: 3.350m, 3.920m w/ Second Chance-Light ERA
Hull height: 1.240m
Hull width: 2.160m
Hull length: 7.140m
Turret ring: 2.150m (same as M1)
Ground clearance: 0.46m
Empty weight: 35 tonnes
Combat weight: 36-40 tonnes, depending on configuration
Maximum speed: 80 km/h (governed)
Maximum reverse speed: 48 km/h (with X1100)
Fuel capacity: 230 US gallons (870 l)
Hull rotation time (360°): 8 seconds
Turret rotation time (360°): 7 seconds
Armament: 75mm Lancer CT Autocannon, 2-3 machine guns
Ammunition load: 150 75mm CT rounds, ~9,000 MMG rounds, ~800 HMG rounds
Stabilization: 2-axis, passively stabilized
Main gun elevation/depression: 25/-12 degrees
Ammunition types (75mm): HEAT-MP-T (programmable), HEDP-T (programmable), APFSDS-T, HEAT-T, TP-T, TPCSDS-T, HE-OR-T


FIREPOWER

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The CARACAL has the most versatile armament of any modern fighting vehicle. Standard armament consists of a smoothbore 75mm automatic cannon, capable of variable rates of fire between 50 and 200 rounds per minute, in three shot bursts. This cannon fires caseless single-piece ammunition from a magazine contained in the turret bustle. The cannon is of the swing-chamber type, with a separate chamber segment that swings to the left of the gun axis under the force of recoil. At the end of its stroke, it triggers an electrically-driven feed mechanism capable of loading the gun at over 400 rounds per minute, limited to 200 in practice. This feed mechanism is capable of feeding the gun at all attitudes and arcs of rotation.

The 75mm cannon is fully programmable, and is integrated with the tank's stabilization and situational awareness systems. This gives the tank great capability against softer targets like infantry, helicopters, and light armored vehicles. For example, one mode coordinates a three-round burst of 75mm programmable high explosive projectiles, according to the target being engaged. When attacking infantry, the CARACAL's gun fires three projectiles at a calculated dispersion given the range detected by the tank's sensors, ensuring that each projectile bursts above the ground near the target at the very edge of every other round's radius. These rounds can be patterned in line, rank, cloverleaf, and other patterns, for destructive capability far, far beyond that of even higher-caliber artillery guns. Against lightly armored vehicles and IFVs, the CARACAL's 75mm gun can be programmed to either maximize hit probability or penetration. In the former mode, the gun works by attacking a smaller dispersion area against the identified target, ensuring the highest probability of a knock out hit. In the latter mode, three 75mm rounds are programmed to strike the exact same location, allowing the first two hits to detonate or disrupt any explosive reactive or non explosive reactive armor on the vehicle. Likewise, when attacking helicopters, this same capability allows the CARACAL to fire a maximum-hit-probability group at its target, enabling the CARACAL to quickly kill helicopters before they can engage it back. This enables the CARACAL MMEV to dominate its battlespace versus air and ground threats alike.

The CARACAL is not your average expeditionary light tank, however. With a 2,150mm turret ring, the CARACAL is capable of accepting all M1-compatible turrets and guns, including 140mm tank gun systems designed by Royal Ordnance, GIAT, and Rheinmetall. This ensures that the CARACAL chassis remains competitive in the event of a high intensity conflict with a high density of enemy main battle tanks. Against lighter, less capable offerings from other companies, the CARACAL is in a class by itself.

With the combination of an incredibly effective and versatile 75mm gun, and main battle tank caliber armament that can defeat even the most advanced threats, the HONDENAAIER INDUSTRIES, LTD. CARACAL MEDIUM MULTIPURPOSE EXPEDITIONARY VEHICLE is the right solution for the unpredictable future nonlinear battlespace of tomorrow!


ARMOR

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The CARACAL MMEV provides the most cost-effective and flexible armor solution of any main battle fighting vehicle available today. At its foundation, the CARACAL MMEV comes proofed against 30mm HEDP ammunition from attack angles as generous as 60 degrees from the horizon. This basic layer of armor not only protects the CARACAL from small arms fire, heavy machine gun fire, and most autocannon fire, but shields the CARACAL against attack helicopter cannon fire as well. Even in the lightest package, the CARACAL protects against high explosive shells as large as 105mm from a distance of 5m, as well as rocket and light antitank weapon fire at severe angles. The comprehensive protection package doesn't end there, however, as the CARACAL also comes with a modular armor attachment system built-in to the base armor layer, allowing it to mount extensive Explosive Reactive Armor and Non-Explosive Reactive Armor packages over its glacis, mantlet, turret, and side skirts. The Second Chance-Light ERA package, for example protects against an additional 600mm of RHA penetration, giving the fully-equipped CARACAL MMEV a total of almost 800mm RHA protection from the frontal aspect.

Against mines and IEDs, the CARACAL MMEV is protected by a generous 40mm thick armor plate as the base layer, but also has mounting points for additional belly armor packages including NERA and laminate armor. At its maximum threat armor package, the CARACAL protects against TM-72 and Type 84 anti-tank mines, as well as large IED warheads.

Beyond its passive armor package, the CARACAL also offers upgrade capability with a wide variety of Active Protection Systems, including the comprehensive Regal APS, which couples a computer-controlled multi-function Doppler radar to Low Reaction Time (LRT) projectile dispensers that can intercept a variety of incoming missiles from 600-3,000 m/s velocity. Regal also incorporates a multi-function signal jammer to confuse and deflect incoming missiles away from the CARACAL MMEV.

Further, the CARACAL MMEV so-equipped with both ERA and APS systems still stays within the weight and size limits necessary for two to be comfortably transported in a C-17 Globemaster III transport aircraft, with roll-on/roll-off capability. This allows the CARACAL MMEV to deploy to anywhere in the world within hours, to everywhere from major airports to unprepared grasslands, while doubling the strategic capability of an armored force versus current heavier main battle tank offerings.

So protected, the CARACAL is a tough adversary, capable of going toe-to-toe and emerging victorious against the latest man-portable anti-tank weapons, helicopter-fired ATGMs, and main battle tank cannons. Far from being “just another light tank”, the CARACAL MMEV is a true “high transportable” medium main battle fighting vehicle.


MOBILITY

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At its maximum weight configuration, the CARACAL MMEV is packing 32 hp/tonne, giving it a full third more power to weight than competing heavier main battle tanks. This additional power, coupled with advanced transmission and suspension options, gives the CARACAL unprecedented battlefield mobility that allows it to attack the enemy any time, anywhere, and melt away before the enemy can coordinate a counter-attack. The CARACAL embodies the modern incarnation of the firefighting tank, able to sprint from hotspot to hotspot to attack and defeat the enemy so that friendly forces can take objectives and defeat the enemy in detail. As a dynamic fire support weapon, the CARACAL is unparalleled; its speed, coupled with its devastating firepower allow it to rapidly support allied forces and defeat enemy air and ground threats alike, making it a key component in future battle plans that demand rapid, total victory.



OPTICS AND COMMUNICATION

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The CARACAL MMEV is equipped with the latest optical sensors, thermal all-weather vision equipment, internal radar and early warning systems, laser rangefinders and designators, and electronic network integration systems. This comprehensive optics and communication suite makes the CARACAL the most situationally aware vehicle on the battlefield, as well as the vehicle with the lowest reaction time to any threat. Mounted on the right of the turret is the commander's cupola, fully equipped with all around multi-function day/night/all-weather periscopes mounted around the hatch. On the left of the turret is the gunner's periscope, also an all-weather multi-function model with full thermal and low light capabilities. Both the commander and gunner are fully equipped to fight in any weather under the protection of the CARACAL's armor, minimizing the amount of time that either crewmember must remain unbuttoned. Due to this, the CARACAL can fight at any time, in any environment, including in nuclear threat zones.

The CARACAL's databus is fully compatible with MIL-STD-1553, and also supports IEEE 1394, giving the CARACAL the most flexible electronics suite of any modern armored fighting vehicle, and that means the CARACAL is an eminently upgradeable vehicle that can adapt to changing requirements and new technology. Likewise, the CARACAL is a fully networked vehicle, able to communicate in an instant with allied air, sea, and land forces through its fully FIPS-140-compliant network suite. All of the network and electronics modules on the CARACAL are also completely modular, easing the demands of full fleet refurbishment and giving the CARACAL the lowest projected upgrade costs of any current armored vehicle.


THE CARACAL MMEV is the world's future premier lightweight main battle fighting vehicle, able to deploy rapidly to anywhere in the world at a moment's notice twice as efficiently as the modern main battle tank. Capable of defeating all threats, air or ground, while completing mission objectives and providing maximum survivability and battlefield persistence for allied forces, the CARACAL is THE next-generation fighting vehicle for tomorrow's non-euclidean battlezone. Choose to win. Choose the CARACAL MEDIUM MULTIPURPOSE EXPEDITIONARY VEHICLE.



HONDENAAIER INDUSTRIES, LTD., WE GO IN DEEP FOR DEFENSE



OOC Supplementary Stuff:

OK, so this is a section for out of character supplementary info regarding my design, some of which was requested by Colli. First, here's the Caracal with the maximum ERA package:

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It's not a proper render because the render function on my SolidWorks appears to have broken for the moment. Oh well, anyway, it illustrates the package. More to come.

Alright, I've calculated the total weight of that heavy ERA package, and it comes to 4.2 tonnes. That's based on the weight of Kontakt-5, and the volume of ERA on the Caracal.

Here's the total weight breakdown for the Caracal:

Caracal weight breakdown:

Hull weight, bare: 11.63 tonnes

Driver's hatch weight: 0.196 tonnes

Turret weight, bare: 6.08

Mantlet weight, bare: 0.869 tonnes

Optics weight: 0.357 tonnes

Commander's hatch weight: 0.063 tonnes

Gunner's hatch weight: 0.035 tonnes

Periscope weights:

0.014 tonnes

0.014 tonnes

Total armor percentage: 56% (without ERA)

ERA weight: 1.9 tonnes (light), 4.2 tonnes (heavy)

Fender/side skirts weight: 0.49 tonnes

Gun weight: 1.144 tonnes (3.3%)

Ammunition weight: 0.810 tonnes

Fuel weight (230 US gallons): 0.696 tonnes

Powerpack weight: 4,300 kilograms (12.4%)

Track and suspension weight: 0.196 tonnes per roadwheel assembly

(including torsion bars; 14 total, equals 2.744 tonnes), plus

3.560 tonnes for all track links, plus 0.185 tonnes for two idler wheel assemblies, plus 0.485 tonnes for two sprockets. (22.2% for all track and suspension elements combined)

Total estimated weight (current): 34.4 tonnes (clean), 36.3 tonnes (light ERA), 38.6 tonnes (heavy ERA)


Track contact area is as follows:

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That equals 4.87 square meters area. Here are the contact dimensions, if you want:

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The dimensions of the ammunition, by the way, are 130mmx530mm. The ammunition is perfectly cylindrical.

 

 

  • Applesauce Bandit"s LCARV

 

LCARV (Light Combat Armored Reconnaissance Vehicle)

Final submission

 

 

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Specifications

---------------------------------

 

General

    • 2 crew (driver, commander/gunner)

    • Target designation system to help fill role of gunner

    • Aluminum alloy armor supplemented with composite armor and conventional steel

 

Mobility

    • Approx. 20 tons combat loaded (without armor packages)

    • 600 bhp diesel or 660 bhp diesel

    • 0.45m ground clearance

    • 0.45 kg/cm2 ground pressure, zero penetration

    • 4.4 cm2 total ground contact area

 

Protection (without armor package)

    • STANAG IV protection from sides and rear

    • STANAG VI protection frontally

    • Hull floor and crew seats optimized for protection against mines and IEDs

    • Bulkheads, fuel, and engine provide additional protection to crew.

    • Turret design fully protects crew while hull down

 

Firepower

    • 60mm smoothbore autocannon

    • 1 coaxial MG

    • -9°/+30° gun elevation

    • 99 cannon rounds on board.  75 in automated carousel system, 24 ready

    • Programmable (single or 3 round burst, 230 maximum burst RPM, shot placement, ammo)

    • HE with airburst capability, APFSDS

 

Minimum size (tracks on)

    • 2.4m height, 6.2m length, 3m width

   

Size with armor package, fenders, and cameras

    • 2.8m height, 6.4m length, 3.3m width

    • Armor package not available for air transit

 

Other systems

    • 8 smoke dischargers mounted on turret

    • Modular panoramic camera system for commander

    • Target designation and tracking abilities, greatly decreasing workload of commander during gunnery

    • Automatic fire suppression systems

    • Mounting area over barrel for a variety of equipment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designed by Little Caesar's Enterprises, Inc. the LCARV is a novel design for rapidly delivering formidable firepower wherever it's needed.  

 

 

Mobility:

 

With its small size and weighing just under 20 tons, the LCARV is able to be deployed from an AC-130 in a combat ready state.  Its relatively low weight and ground pressure allow superb mobility over unfavorable terrain, and its powerful engine provides it with greater speed than most other tracked vehicles.  In many ways, this LCARV is a spiritual successor of the RDF/LT, taking advantages of the latest improvements in technology and the changing face of war.

 

The LCARV shares many parts with the M3 Bradely IFV, most notably the tracks, wheels, and various automotive components.  

 

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Protection:

 

In order to keep the weight low enough for air transport, armor-grade aluminum was chosen for protection, supplemented in vital areas with highly effective composite armors.  In certain areas, conventional steel armor was used as well.  The frontal placement of the engine, transmission, and fuel also improve the crew's visibility with little to no increase in weight.  Beyond creating more material to protect the crew, land mines and IEDs are also more likely to direct most of the blow in the unoccupied portion of the vehicle.  The low profile turret, reminiscent of prior projects, allows the LCARV to fire from a hull-down position while keeping the screw fully concealed.  The ribbed armor on the front hull acts very similarly to the legendary S Tank, but with an even better 83° slope to counter more modern ammunition.

 

Various packages are available, utilizing NERA, composites, ceramics, and modern APS systems.  The goal of these is to greatly improve protection against various autocannons, ATGMs, and conventional shaped charge warheads for higher intensity conflicts.

 

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(Frontal coverage of armor pack shown)

 

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Firepower:

 

The main gun is a modified version of the 60mm HMVS by Oto Melera.  The gun is dual feed, allowing the commander to select between firing APFSDS or HE.  The autoloading system pulls the ammunition from the automated carousel at the floor of the turret basket, up into the feeding system to be ready to fire.  The main gun ammunition uses combustible cartridges, with experiments currently taking place with telescoping ammunition as well.  The current projectiles are identical to what is used in the Italian HMVS.  A machine gun is mounted coaxially to the main gun.

 

The 60mm round was chosen for its versatility.  Not only is it able to defeat certain older MBTs frontally in some situations, it is also able to effectively use programmable fuzes that would not be possible with smaller calibers.  The 60mm HVMS from Israel and Italy also provide us with a more tried and tested design. 

 

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Miscellaneous:

 

A modular panoramic sight for the commander is located at the highest point on the vehicle, removing any potential blindspots.  The LCARV uses target tracking and designation system similar to what may be found on other modern AFVs, allowing the commander to be much more efficient.  After a target is designated, the systems is able to track up to four targets at once, firing on them automatically when ready.

 

 

Additionally, doors at the rear of the vehicle serve both as emergency exits for the crew, and to dramatically ease the process of reloading the carousel.  The turret is slightly sunken into the hull of the vehicle, decreasing the chances of a stray round or fragment jamming the turret.  The turret ring diameter is shared with the M551 Sheridan as well.

 

 

In terms of function, the LCARV outperforms the Bradley in mobility, protection, and firepower in exchange for its ability to carry troops.  The superb mobility and small profile make the LCARV ideal for scouting roles.  With armor packages, the LCARV is able to fill a more direct combat role.  Very few vehicles on the battle field outside of an MBT would be able to beat it in firepower and make its protection irrelevant, while still performing recon roles as well the next day.  In short, you would be hard-pressed to find a more versatile combat vehicle.

 

 

 

Some numbers:

 

Just like my tank crush, the HSTV-L, the thing I made is 95" in height
Absolute height (tracks to panoramic sight) is 109"

Length (end of tracks on either side) is 244"
Length (end of rear tow to front applique) 254"

Width (hull edge to edge) is 81"
Width (armor skirts) is 126"
Width (outer track edges) is 119"
Width (track center-center) is 102"

Track contact length: 164"
Track width is 21"
Total contact area: 6888"sq
Track ratio wizardry: 1.61

 

15mm front "roof", 44mm UFP, 51mm "turret guard," and 63mm LFP in RHA provide ~110mm RHAe.  63mm turret face also provides that.  Sides and rear at 38mm RHAe I think should stop 14.5mm API.  With some of the new fancy 7xxx series alloys that have been showing up, I think that's possible under 20 tons.

 

 

 

 

Unofficial side notes:

Using RHA to calculate armor weight, the hull came out at about 8.7 tons.  The armor weight (and weight in general) involved a lot of guesswork, and it could most certainly be less than what I've estimated.  

 

I seriously did not expect this to be a carbon copy of HSTV-L, which probably sounds like hogwash considering how much I like it and the other RDF/LT stuff.  Stuff like the weight, turret, being carried by C-130 then having applique to add more armor, 2 man crew (alright, some had 3 as well), and probably other stuff.  The height (without the panoramic camera) is even the same as the HSTV-L, down to the inch.  Seriously though, beyond the general looks biasing me, the rest wasn't planned.

 

Apparently a 60mm gun was trialed alongside the 75mm ARES by the US, but that could be the pasta gun or the jew gun.

 

 

Some things may not be perfectly to scale.  Ammo, gun, tracks, and other vital stuff like that was checked.

 

In my defence, it's still May 5th for the next few hours.

 

I forgot how to render in ortho, plus I'm lazy, so I think there's only one actual render there

 

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Edit for hull down picture and armor coverage picture, forgot to mention steel.  Typos, format issues, and incorrect numbers were corrected.

 

Edit 2:o fuk I only had a drive wheel on one side.  Thankfully, that's only visible in two of those pictures, one where it's a meaningful mistake.  Too lazy to remake the multiview, but the first render is fixed.  Typo in side notes corrected

 

 

 

FINAL SUBMISSION

 

ROOIBAADJE INDUSTRIES PRESENTING:

 

The "Slimme" AFV!

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Dimensions:

Length: 5230 mm 

Width: 3160 mm

Height: 2346 mm

 

Crew:

Commander

Driver

Gunner/Loader

 

Armament:

1 autoloading smoothbore 120 mm mortar

1 Bushmaster III 35 mm autocannon

1 dual Spike-ER launcher

 

Protection:

High hardness steel hull body with Relikt ERA on hull front and sides.

 

Effective KE thickness of the steel body:

Glacis: 483 mm 

Lower glacis: 157 mm

Side hull: 37 mm

Top hull: 37 mm

Hull floor: 37 mm

 

Weights:

Unstowed weight: 34.33 tons

Combat weight: 36.65 tons

 

And because I'm slightly lazy:

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Hull weight is slightly inaccurate because that Excel sheet cannot into sponsons. I'm also quite sceptical of the suspension weight.

 

Contact area tracks

Solid ground: 3000x540 mm

Soft ground: ~3515x540 mm

 

Power pack and final drive:

Engine: MT 881 Ka-500 (1000 bhp)

Transmission: Renk HSWL 256

 

Layout:

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In the front the engine and transmission, with below it the 800 liter fuel tank which doubles as protection against shaped charges from mines and IEDs. Behind that the mortar with its autoloader and 70 shell ammorack (including propellant). And last but not least, the crew compartment with a dimension of (LxWxH) 1400x2000x1300 mm.

 

The 'inspiration' for this whole idea is the ever increasing accuracy of indirect fire weapons due to the development of guided shells. Instead of going for an AFV with a medium caliber cannon I went with a 120 mm mortar since there are guided 120 mm mortar shells. Right now GPS guided rounds should be available and semi active laser guided shells are in development. The fire control system will receive the targeting data from a drone carried by the vehicle, from other vehicles (like the current BMP-4) or other sources. This allows the vehicle to hit things at pretty incredible distances. Even though the mortar itself is shorter than normal mortars, it should still have a range of close to 10 km (A full length 120 mm mortar has a maximum range of 15 km with the use of guided shells). The RCWS in the form of a Samson Mk.2 turret is more or less back-up, although both weapon systems in the turret are still very capable weapons. When engaging armour at a distance (4000+ m) both the mortar and the Spike ER ATGMs are capable of engaging the target. But in the case of the Spike missiles only when there is a clear line of sight.

 

To elaborate a bit more on the choice for a mortar, it gives the vehicle a lot more flexibility. With the use of guided shells a reverse slope can be hit, which is challenging if not outright impossible with a normal mortar. A smoothbore mortar might give a lower firing accuracy than a rifled mortar, but that doesn't matter since the guided shells will compensate for that. And since it's smoothbore, it can fire shape stabilised shells (read: HEAT). Which, with a proper guidance system, will give it anti-armour capabilities versus almost everything. Since the mortar can fire straight up it can be employed in whatever position the vehicle fits. This allows the mortar to be employed in really close quarters combat, since the guidance package can direct the shell to, literally, the enemy next door.

 

If the mortar will not be able to lay down fire quick enough on LOS targets, the 35 mm can be employed. While the anti-armour capabilities of the 35 mm APFSDS aren't impressive versus heavily armoured vehicles, it can still do the job versus lightly armoured vehicles like APCs, IFVs and recon vehicles. The anti-personel capabilities of the 35 mm KETF (Kinetic Energy Time Fused) rounds are certainly very impressive.

 

The vehicle's V-hull will protect the underside against buckling due to the pressure of mines or IEDs. The minimum ground clearance is 416 mm with the maximum clearance being 592 mm. This, combined with a 25 mm thick floor plate should be enough to withstand most of the mines and IEDs. The fuel tank of the vehicle is placed underneath the engine and in front of the autoloader for the mortar. This fuel tank doubles as protection versus shaped charges. 

 

The sloped 100 mm front hull is capable of stopping all modern autocannons and some older tank cannons. With the addition of Relikt ERA it should be capable of defeating modern long rod penetrators and HEAT warheads. The turret is rated lower, at STANAG IV, which protects it against small arms fire and shrapnel. But since the vehicle should stay out of LOS combat with AFVs and since the main weapon is hidden inside the hull its protection value is sufficient. The Samson Mk.2 RCWS allows reloading from inside the vehicle, so when reloading the Spike launcher and/or autocannon, the loader is safe. The RCWS itself has no components inside the hull. If need be, it can be changed to a different make or model.

 

The drone can be man-operated, but can also be given instructions, which it will execute by itself. The drone can, for example, be told to hold 1000 meters in front of the vehicle. Whenever the vehicle moves, the drone will move as well, always staying 1000 meters in front of the vehicle. This allows the commander to keep all their attention at communications, looking for targets or whatever it is what commanders do, instead of having to worry about flying a drone.

 

If there is one thing this vehicle excels at, it's messing whatever up whatever ground target it sees without the target ever seeing the vehicle. Because last time I checked, you couldn't see through sand, rocks, buildings, etc.

 

Yes, I know the swing arms point the wrong way.

 

 

 

FINAL ENTRY

 

2S37 плесень

 

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Width: 3.28m

Length (not including main armament): 6.22m

Length (gun forward): 10.18m

Length (gun rear): 9.72m

Height: 2.48m

Crew: 3 (driver, commander, gunner)

Weight: 30 tons

Frontal Armor: 50mm at 65 deg

Other armor: 20-30mm

Hull empty weight: ~8450 kg

Turret empty weight: ~2700 kg

Turret ring diameter: 1800mm

Turret front armor: 60mm at 45 degrees

Other turret armor: 30mm

Track width: 400mm

Length of contact patch: 4.70m

Total surface area in contact with ground: 3.76m^2

Ground pressure: 78 kPa = 11.3 psi

Engine: V-92S2

Engine power: 746 kW / 1000 hp

Engine dimensions: Length 1.5m, Width 900mm Height 900mm

Engine weight: 1020 kg

Engine+Transmission+Cooling system weight: ~4000 kg

Main armament: 2A29K smoothbore 100mm gun

Main armament loading system: Autoloader similar to T-72

Main armament rate of fire: ~10 rpm

Main armament elevation range: -12/31 degrees

Main armament + loading system weight: 2,500 kg (wiki list's 2,750 kilos, but that's including wheels, gun shield, towing equipment, and other stuff that isn't needed)

Secondary armament: AGS-30 automatic grenade launcher

Secondary armament: KPV 14.5mm heavy machine gun

 

Description

 

Upon receipt of design requirements, it was decided to use another vehicle as the "base", and modify the design from that. Originally, this was to be the BMP-3, however, upon further thought, it was decided to use the 2S25 Sprut airmobile tank destroyer. While the final design of the 2S37 does not share any major components with the 2S25, the Sprut was something of an inspiration.

 

The 2S37 was an attempt to meet three sometimes contradictory design requirements; anti-vehicle performance, infantry support capability, and easy transportability. Almost immediately, it was realized that not all requirements put forth could be met at the same time. Fitting the vehicle into a C-130/An-12 class aircraft would have imposed severe constraints on design and weight, which would have adversely affected performance in other areas. Instead, it was decided to design the 2S37 for transport in an Il-76 class aircraft. Assuming a total payload of 60 tons, a weight of 30 tons would allow two 2S37s to be carried in each aircraft.

 

The next choice was the main armament. While the 2S37 was not intended to face modern vehicles such as the M1 or T-90, it was realized in various "brushfire" conflicts it could run into tanks such as the T-55 or M48. Having a gun capable of defeating these tanks was thought to be essential. The Sprut managed to fit a 125mm gun into a chassis weighing less than 20 tons, but at the cost of low armor and other compromises. Instead, it was decided to use the 2A29 100mm antitank gun, fitted with an automatic loading device, and a modern stabilization and fire control system. Though an older weapon, the 2A29 with modern ammunition was easily capable of defeating tanks such as the T-55 from long range. The addition of the 9M117 gun launched anti-tank missile increased the weapon's range even further. Another important factor was the large HE payload of the 100mm gun (compared to other options considered such as a 57mm autocannon). This would enable the 2S37 to be useful in an infantry support role, or even as ad hoc artillery. It was considered to put the main armament in an unmanned turret, but this was decided against, for reasons of simplicity and to allow the crew to load the gun in the event of autoloader failure (this would severely reduce RoF).

 

However, the 2A29 not be sufficient for infantry support and operations in urban areas. A coaxial KPV machine gun was an easy fitting to improve this, but the designers felt that more was needed. The AGS-30 automatic grenade launcher was a low-weight weapon system which massively improved utility in the close support role. Fitted in a smaller turret on the rear of the main one, the AGS-30 could be used in a direct fire role or indirect fire at short ranges against soft targets.

 

The armor layout of the 2S37 was another important aspect of the design, one which was driven by both the weight and design philosophy. The primary armor material is a lightweight steel alloy (ρ = 7300 m3), which allowed for some weight savings while still having good properties. It was desired to make the 2S37 immune to low caliber autocannons in the frontal arc, in order that it could engage vehicles such as the M2 Bradley with impunity. While the 2S37's superior main armament would help, armor was also needed. Research showed that approximately 80mm of line of sight thickness would provide an acceptable level of protection. It was decided to utilize a 50mm thick armor plate sloped at 65 degrees, for a total thickness on the upper glacis, for a total LoS thickness of about 115mm. This would provide an adequate margin, and the sloping would give some protection against move primitive shaped charges. ERA plates can optionally be fitted, although the addition of these will increase the weight of the 2S37 beyond transportability limits. The sides and rear of the vehicle were armored to 30mm, to provide resistance against machine gun rounds.

 

The V92-S2 engine from the T-90 was chosen as the powerplant, giving a power/weight ratio of 33 horsepower / ton. This gives the 2S37 excellent mobility, while using an off-the-shelf engine. A new cooling system was required to fit the V92 into the 2S37's smaller chassis. The V84 engine is also available as a low-cost option. Suspension is conventional torsion bars, utilizing purpose designed components.

 

 

 

 

 

Okay, here is my non-eligible submission:

 

FINAL VERSION

 

AFV-M 4 "Switchblade"

 

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Statistics

 

Switchblade 1:

  • Length - 4.9m (hull); 5.6m (gun forward)
  • Width - 3m (compact config); 3.4m (suspension extended)
  • Height - 2.4m (stowed)
  • Weight - 15mt (bare); 18.5mt (fully loaded + addon armour)
  • Ground clearance - 0.57m (suspension extended)
  • Speed - 110km/h (on road), 20km/h (off road)
  • Armour: 100mm RHA + 250mm NERA on cab front, 50mm RHA + 200mm NERA on cab sides, 50mm RHA on cab top and bottom; 15mm RHA otherwise
  • Weapons: 75mm L40 Autoloader (45 rounds), 7.62mm MG coax
  • Ammunition (75mm L40) - APBC, HE (including programmable air burst), HEDP, HEAT, various other (training, smoke, canister, illumination etc)
  • Main gun elevation/depression - +45/-10 degrees
  • Main gun rate of fire: 40 RPM
  • Other: 2 x smoke dischargers in turret, 4 X hard kill units (mongoose) 

Switchblade 2:

  • Length - 6.0m (hull); 6.4m (gun forward)
  • Width - 3m (compact config); 3.4m (suspension extended)
  • Height - 2.4m (stowed)
  • Weight - 16mt (bare); 19mt (fully loaded + addon armour)
  • Ground clearance - 0.57m (suspension extended)
  • Speed - 110km/h (on road), 20km/h (off road)
  • Armour: 50mm RHA cab top front, 50mm RHA + 200mm NERA on cab sides, 50mm RHA on cab top and bottom; 15mm RHA otherwise
  • Weapons: 75mm L40 Autoloader (40 rounds), 7.62mm MG coax
  • Ammunition (75mm L40) - APBC, HE (including programmable air burst), HEDP, HEAT, various other (training, smoke, canister, illumination etc)
  • Main gun elevation/depression - +45/-10 degrees
  • Main gun rate of fire: 40 RPM
  • Other: 2 x smoke dischargers in turret, 4 X hard kill units (mongoose), 1.4m x 1,4m x 1m modular bay, drone launch rail, provision for ERA over crew compartment

 

Description

 

The Switchblade project was undertaken by our internal design unit as a response to the general project tender issued by exco. Here, our intent was to satisfy the stringent weight and dimensional requirements needed for air-deployability, while still providing enough firepower and protection to deal with any battlefield threats short of heavy AFVs.

 

The initial study made use of cutting-edge automation and visualisation approaches and resulted in a small, wheeled vehicle operated by two crew members inside a heavily-armoured capsule. Here a combination of conventional steel armour, add-on arrays and an integrated active protection suite was chosen in order to protect the crew. Specifically, the thickness of steel was chosen to provide full protection against heavy autocannons frontally, with side/top protection being capable of protecting against lighter autocannon firing AP or HEDP. Protection against ATGMs was provided by the add-on NERA arrays and the APS suite; which included both passive laser detection, active radar detection and hard-kill units. Mine and IED protection was provided by the double-layered hull floor, armoured seats, seat suspension system and water-filling of the tires.

 

The proposed armament was a 30-40mm autocannon (preferably in the CTA configuration), but this was later changed to a 75mm gun capable of using conventional 75x350mmR ammunition at the insistence of exco; who also authorised immediate initial low-rate production of new AP and training rounds. The penny dropped when we discovered that Terry had recently acquired a refurbished M24 Chaffee, with the upshot being that a number of live-fire tests for the new rounds were conducted by exco themselves during their monthly retreat. 

 

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Having made the initial changes to the design, we found ourselves making peace with the odd choice of armament. Although deeply unsuitable for development of an APFSDS variant (a lengthened case designed to allow for the same overall dimensions was eventually proposed to partially rectify this), the venerable 75mm had a number of distinct advantages for our project. Firstly, the existing APC and HEAT ammunition developed for the gun, although over 70 years old, was still more than enough to deal with any currently existing AFV not based on an MBT chassis. Here the APC proved especially interesting, as it was found to be almost unaffected by modern active protection systems, ERA and NERA in testing. The existing HE was also more than adequate for the purpose of infantry support, with the mount being very suitable for indirect fire and high-angle fire into buildings. The compact nature of the round also allowed for the use of a simple carousel-type autoloader, which fed the gun through a swinging feed tube assembly in the turret bustle. Finally, there was no issue of IP or licencing of the gun or ammunition technology, as any patents had long since expired. The gun, when added to a conventional coaxial machinegun, was thus felt to be more than adequate for the tasks the vehicle would face.

 

With the basic armament selected, we pressed on with more detailed changes. The gun tube was fitted with a thermal sleeve, laser alignment system, sights and 2-axis stabilization gear. A bore extractor was unnecessary, as the entire turret was unmanned. Instead, all of the systems (main gun sight, coaxial sight/wide angle sight and stowable commander's sight) were linked to the crew capsule and displayed on high-resolution displays. For the commander's sight and driver's sight, a single design was used incorporating two stabilized cameras linked to a 3-D display. This was felt to improve the spatial perception of the crew when interacting with using the system. For the driver, three viewing blocks were provided as a backup in the event that his sight was damaged or obscured.

 

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Along with the innovative vision system, our group also grappled with the issue of automotive components for such a compact vehicle. The engine - a Scania V8 diesel unit producing up to 590kW - was housed in a modular bay and used to power a hybrid drivetrain. However, cost concerns and further design directives from exco (Dion was involved in the development of the Spinnekop mine protected vehicle in the early 1980s) lead to a hydrolic hybrid drivetrain being selected. The new system operated in series, with the reservoir, pump, accumulator and distributor being housed in the engine compartment. The wheels were again directly driven, with the motors being fed from armoured piping (including self-sealing valves in the event of rupture) that ran along steel housings located on the hull sides. The housings also served to house the electrical system, and were constructed from armour plate. The resulting drive system was compact but maintenance-intensive. This issue also plagued the suspension system, which was designed to be retracted and lowered in order to allow the vehicle to squeeze into a C-130. The process of retracting the suspension was time-consuming, and involved shortening each strut and linkage connecting the wheel to the hull. With 8 wheels to service, the process could take hours even for an experienced crew.

 

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With preliminary design and prototyping done, the first switchblade prototype was sent for testing and evaluation. The results... were not good. Exco, which was again taking an active role in the process, was particularly unhappy with the size of the crew capsule , its resistance to mines and the overworked nature of the crew. During the development process they had also become interested in marketing a family of vehicles based on the same chassis. As such, we were instructed to change the weapon system to fit within a modular bay format.

 

After a frantic redesign process, our group came up with a compromise version of the Switchblade with a four-man crew and W-hull mine protection for the capsule. This increased the capsule size considerably and lengthened the chassis (resulting in a 10X10 drive cofiguration), but a rearrangement of the principle components allowed the overall height to remain the same at the expense of not being able to rotate the turret fully. The new placement of the capsule in the rear of the vehicle also allowed us to dispense with the thick frontal armour array, which kept the overall weight increase to a minimum. Finally, the new arrangement allowed us to solve one of the most pressing issues identified during testing: that the crew had significant difficulty exiting the vehicle in an emergency. Our initial solution had been to make the entire front hull swing forwards (aided by a powder-driven ram), but this was obviously a clunky solution.

 

A troubling aspect of the vehicle that manifestly was not improved by the redesign was the issue of auxillary sights for the driver if his main sight was not functional. Our solution was to place a number of vision ports around the crew capsule, but this did nothing for the view forwards - which was blocked by the turret. To alleviate the issue, we designed a folding periscope, which was mounted in place of the driver's top hatch. Another new issue concerned the ammunition stowage of the main gun, which was reduced somewhat in order to fit the entire mechanism within the modular weapons bay.

 

 

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The second switchblade prototype, once finalised, was fully assembled and tested at our land developments range. Here it was deemed satisfactory for production and marketing, although a few lingering problems were discovered which we have yet to adequately solve. The most pressing of these concerns the automotive components, which are still maintenance-intensive. Suspension travel is another concern, although the ground clearance was deemed satisfactory for use. The weapons system, on the other hand, performed as expected; with crew workload being eased by the inclusion of a dedicated gunner and C3 crewman.

 

 

During qualification testing, the Switchblade proved capable of rapidly engaging targets while on the move. Provision for airburst fuzing (either programmable or radar-fuzed) allowed hits to be made on attack helicopter and CAS aircraft targets. The commander's sight, which includes provision for position marking and turret override, proved to be a useful system for spotting and handing off targets to the gunner. Protection was deemed to be satisfactory, with the crew capsule being completely isolated from ammunition stowage and other volatiles. In testing, the armour package proved to be capable of protecting the crew against ATGMs and heavy autocannon from the front, with the sides and rear being protected against lighter anti-tank weapons and standard rounds from lighter autocannon.

 

Final modifications before production commences are the inclusion and integration of communications and electronics equipment (including a hull telephone and on-board UAV operated by the C3 crewman), the improvement of automotive and drivetrain components and the development of hull modules for the weapons bay. Module variants being presently developed include a sensor mast and RWS (including a small-calibre autocannon) for scouting and light fire support; an ATGM turret for anti-armour operations; a mortar turret for short-range fire support; a MRL system for long-range fire support; a drone bay for observation and light attack missions; and an engineering suite (including hydrolic crane or digger options) for battlefield support.

 

 

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Approximate component weights (Switchblade 2):

  • Hull: 9000kg
  • Addon armour: 2000kg
  • Turret, stowage, autoloading gear, crew equipment and accessories: 3000kg
  • Drivetrain (including wheels, suspension and fuel fraction): 5000kg

 

 

 

qPBBcKi.jpg

 
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Requirements (basic):

 

Your basic requirements are as follows:

  • Must be capable of protecting against small arms from all aspects, and must be capable of withstanding 20-30mm autocannon fire across the frontal arc.
  • Must be capable of engaging and defeating existing AFV designs (not including modern MBTs) at modern combat ranges.
  • Must be air-transportable using existing transport aircraft (preferably AC-130 or equivalent) in either a ready-to-run or partially disassembled state.
  • Must be capable of defending against at least one strike by man-portable anti-tank weapons, including ATGMs
  • Must include weaponry or equipment for engaging with dug-in infantry in urban areas
  • Must be capable of defending against mines, roadside bombs and IEDs
  • Must be highly reliable, including servicing at local depots.
  • Must cost the same or less than equivalent systems (around $4 million per unit maximum)
  • Must be capable of off-road travel

 

Futher requirements:

 

Advanced requirements are as follows:

  • May be capable of surviving multiple hits by heavy autocannon (40-60mm) across the frontal arc
  • May be capable of engaging low-flying aircraft and helicopters
  • May be directly air-deployable from existing transport aircraft
  • May be capable of surviving multiple strikes from anti-tank missiles (of all classes) from any angle
  • May include only COTs components
  • May be capable of being serviced in the field.
  • May be in the form of a family of vehicles sharing a common chassis
  • May cost significantly less than equivalent systems (under $3 million per unit)
  • May be capable of extreme off-road travel, including across anti-tank ditches and the like

 

C-130

c-130-cargodims.gif

 

An-12

an12_l2_3a.gif

 

Il-76MD-90A:

 

20 meters long (+4.5 meter ramp)

Width - 3.45 meters

Height - 3.4 meters

Weight - up to 60 tons.

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   So, this is how i see what will be next - each judge individually look at designs and decide if they fit basic or advanced requirements. After we done, judges should talk/PM with each other about results and decide what to do after - award the winner or look at submissions futher. 

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Poop.  I forgot to doublecheck the height, but it's exactly 1" too tall for a C-130 if you're keeping the panoramic camera.  Too late for me to change my submission now, but I don't think it's too unreasonable to think I could make that specific area an inch lower, especially since there's not really much under there in the turret.  You could always have some special sight for air transit or take it off or something too.  The 95" height was from the tracks to the top of that bump on the turret.

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I should be in bed by now since I'm pretty busy tomorrow, but here we go.  I lowered the camera a couple inches, as well as slimmed off some useless space at the front of the turret to block the camera less when looking down.

 

 

First one is the new turret design in front of the old.  The green bar with blue scribbles it the 9ft limit.

 

HoUpKfE.png

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