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Oh yeah, I can see Gwar doing a really superb live show.   Out of respect for the next artist's litigious tendencies towards youtube videos, I will not be posting any audio/visual material.   In t

Collimatrix's Terrible Music Thread  Collimatrix's Terrible Music Thread  Collimatrix's Terrible Music Thread  Collimatrix's Terrible Music Thread   Collimatrix's Terrible Music Thread    Terri

Now I have Nickelback stuck in my head...  

  • 2 weeks later...

 

An amazing song with an amazing refrain whose message must be delivered to my compatriots in adolescence.

Its a very good song.  Not sure what the post means though.  We are all adults here.

 

Anyhow, I was not blown away by Murder By Deaths last album, although I did rather like this track (music starts around 3:40):

 

 

I did like their recent covers album.  They do cover albums as thank you gifts to their kickstarter supporters.  The people that donate the most get to pick the songs covered.  I rather like their version of Willy Nelson's Angel Flying too Close to the Ground.  

 

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Anybody else feel like there's a problem with our guitar playing tradition? I should preface what I am about to write with a statement that I do not play guitar or any other instrument, so I don't really know what I am talking about. This is more me sounding out an idea than it is a dissertation on the modern guitar playing tradition.

So, the guitar is an interesting instrument, capable of a lot of different sounds. Because it has a chamber and strings, it can be finger-picked, strummed, played with a bow, and played as a drum. It's capable of a lot of different noises. Check out this song to see most of them:



Or this song:



Estas there almost seems like he's adapted a classical guitar playing style, although from what I can tell his strings are steel.

What's remarkable about these two guys is that they play guitar like you'd expect someone to play piano. You all instantly know what I mean; both artists are using the whole instrument, playing multiple notes and chords (forgive my terminology here, it will be terrible - I think my meaning is conveyed, anyway). So why is that "like a piano", not "like an instrument?" I have no freaking idea, but it seems like it is perfectly acceptable (in the US at least) to play a guitar as if one were playing chopsticks on a piano. Simplistic, woeful underutilization of the instrument is the norm, not the exception.

Sure, not everyone can be Estas Tonne or Erik Mongrain, but the basic techniques they are using are at the same time completely different than the bland strumming that most "guitar players" call their art.

Uh. Calm down, Nate. Let's not insult everyone who plays guitar.

Well, I don't know. Every person who learned to play piano from their grandmother, it seems, learned to play complex melodies and harmonies at the same time, even if they don't rise to the level of being able to do it fantastically well. Whereas the modern guitar tradition is like this:

 

Thoughts?

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Thoughts?

Yup, every soft rock song that comes out these days is as technically challenging as wonderwall. It seems like contemporary music (and by this I mean whatever you hear over the loudspeaker at stores) has put a huge emphasis on vocals, sucking the life out of the instruments that make up 80% of the music. What Estas Tonne does is incredibly technically challenging by my understanding of guitar playing (I showed my dad this, he said what Tonne does is beyond him, and he is relatively skilled at guitar), it's actually somewhat similar to common styles of banjo playing though, which amuses me. Here my terminology may fail since I have only ever played double bass, but he's keeping rhythm with drone notes while playing a melody, as is common to banjo playing, although he does not have the benefit of a drone string. 

 

An aside, playing a guitar with a bow is generally a no, because with a flat bridged guitar at least (and I'm not sure that there are any other kinds), you have access only to the low E string, the high E string, or all of them at once (and it's gonna be really difficult to keep that from making screeching noises).

 

Sources cited

[media]

[media]

Strumstrumstrumstrum strumstrum chord change strum strum

Also, this is the first time I've seen any of their faces and that dude looks on par with how bad they sound.

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Have I done Sohodolls yet?  Whatever; it doesn't matter.

 

 

Blah blah blah original sin blah blah blah nihilism of modernity blah blah blah center cannot hold blah blah blah Theodore Dalrymple blah blah blah traces of Industrial, Punk typical of trendy contemporary dance music, blah blah blah I hate chavs something something bleak decaying hopelessness.

 

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Anybody else feel like there's a problem with our guitar playing tradition? I should preface what I am about to write with a statement that I do not play guitar or any other instrument, so I don't really know what I am talking about. This is more me sounding out an idea than it is a dissertation on the modern guitar playing tradition.

So, the guitar is an interesting instrument, capable of a lot of different sounds. Because it has a chamber and strings, it can be finger-picked, strummed, played with a bow, and played as a drum. It's capable of a lot of different noises. Check out this song to see most of them:

Or this song:

Estas there almost seems like he's adapted a classical guitar playing style, although from what I can tell his strings are steel.

What's remarkable about these two guys is that they play guitar like you'd expect someone to play piano. You all instantly know what I mean; both artists are using the whole instrument, playing multiple notes and chords (forgive my terminology here, it will be terrible - I think my meaning is conveyed, anyway). So why is that "like a piano", not "like an instrument?" I have no freaking idea, but it seems like it is perfectly acceptable (in the US at least) to play a guitar as if one were playing chopsticks on a piano. Simplistic, woeful underutilization of the instrument is the norm, not the exception.

Sure, not everyone can be Estas Tonne or Erik Mongrain, but the basic techniques they are using are at the same time completely different than the bland strumming that most "guitar players" call their art.

Uh. Calm down, Nate. Let's not insult everyone who plays guitar.

Well, I don't know. Every person who learned to play piano from their grandmother, it seems, learned to play complex melodies and harmonies at the same time, even if they don't rise to the level of being able to do it fantastically well. Whereas the modern guitar tradition is like this:

 

Thoughts?

Yes, the guitar is relatively easy to play, if you want to learn to play it for your standard country/pop/rock purposes.  If someone wants to be enough of a nerd to master an instrument, they will probably pick an orchestral instrument.  People play guitar because they want to get laid/be popular/be rock stars/or piss off their parents.  But here is the thing.  Piano is even easier to play.  All you have to do is press the keys.  It's even easier than plucking a string.  There are plenty of tricks to playing piano well enough to fool people, just like guitar.  Compare this with playing a wind instrument where you have to practice quite a while to even get a relatively not-horrible sound to come out of the horn. Trust me, there is no easy trick to convincing people that you can play clarinet.  

 

Since I mentioned clarinet, is there anything that celebrates the contributions of Jewish Americans to American culture as much as Benny Goodman performing a clarinet concerto by Aaron Copeland?  I don't think so.  

 

 

Simply gorgeous. 

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    • By steppewolfRO
      I start this thread about music of Romania. Not sure if belongs here as will be more about older music than recent one but if it is more appropriate in the history section please move it there.
       
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