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Seff Effrican Modern Military Mega Information Thred


Toxn
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Having conclusively proven that the Olifant is the best (and most terrifying) MBT ever released into the wild in a tragic move for which we all suffer on an continuous basis, I thought that interested parties might like to know some more about recent military developments in South Africa.

 

First off: here is a picture of the SAS Thabo Mbeki (our recently acquired President-class carrier) seen entering Cape Town harbour:

 

490ec5a5eac0c_large.jpg

 

The South African Navy, who obtained the vessel for what has been described as a 'suspiciously low' price from an anonymous third-party vendor, are reputedly very happy with the increase in long-range striking power that it provides to our armed forces, along with the freshly repainted finish.

 

Another new development has been the recent acquisition by the SANDF of a large amount of 'surplus' equipment. This has begun showing up at army exercises, where it has proved popular with the troops:

kFboP1r.jpg

 

Note the light-weight rifle and snazzy sunglasses - two items especially appreciated by our hard-working lads.

 

Other recent equipment purchases - widely praised for their 'made-in-China affordability', have been focused towards filling specific niches which have become apparent over the last few years:

Norinco_QLZ87_Automatic_Grenade_Launcher

 

Finally, the SANDF is proud to introduce a new line of MBTs to our existing fleet - the Iphisi Main Battle Tank:

UoZNl74.jpg

It is hoped that these placid, benign vehicles will help to stem the Oliphant scourge which we, in our arrogance and pride, unleashed upon the country.

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Here is a recently-surfaced photo of some of our brave boys conducting an exercise near Dullstroom:

 

TbYhEB2.jpg

 

Rumour has it that, after the completion of the exercise, the lads all headed into town to try the famous trout pies and beer.

Good show!

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Olifant tank, seen in the process of invading an exhibition and crushing a display:

olifant_mbt_aad2008_04_dvdb08.JPG

The brave soldier seen on the roof was killed in the process of trying to hurl a grenade down the open hatch. The MBT then went on to squash ten bystanders and mount a T-55, before retreating under heavy fire.

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For you old South African military buffs, here is a nice shot of the Pretoria silo, where a third of our nuclear arsenal was stored (the other third being held at Cape Town and Bloemfontein):

Zack-Boyden.jpg

 

Here is an interior shot of the lower portion of the silo, taken a few years before the 'disassembly' process was begun and we 'retired' our fleet of Long Tom III ICBMs:

intercontinental-ballistic-missile.jpg

Of note is the rotary magazine system (not shown), allowing three ICBMs to be rapidly launched from the single, armoured launch tube.

 

Here is a picture of the launch tube cover plate from above, taken after the conversion of the silo into a 'monument':

From%20the%20Top.jpg?itok=hk08S1Dx

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  • 2 weeks later...

Having just come back from a screening of the new Avengers movie, I can now confirm some of the exciting Seff Effrica-related topics touched on in the film.

SPOILERS, obviously:

The South African Empire does, indeed, include a city on the east coast with a large breaker's yard just outside. I think it used to be called Mombasa.

South African citizens do get a racial bonus against fear-based mind control and exsangiunation from loss of extremities. South African accents, however...

We are presently fighting something of a cold war with Wakanda.

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I'd like to thank this thread for reminding my subconscious that this book exists.

 

 


Reactionary enemy regimes have brutally taken command in South Africa and Germany. U.S. and European shipping lanes are suddenly under attack. World War is at hand -- and for the ruthless Berlin–Boer Axis, the devastating weapons of choice will be tactical nukes used at sea.

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South Afrikans make for some great characters in Hollywood movies. Such as in Lethal Weapon 2, when Riggs is allowed to have consequence-free sex with babe Rika Van Den Hass. As well as being the set-up for this priceless one-liner.

 

 

As a summary, who could have foreseen that the South Afrikans were the least racist people in that movie.

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The newest warship in the South African Navy's arsenel, SAS Hugo Biermann undergoing fitting in Port Elizabeth, this will assure the SAN's ability to take down the dreaded Olifant tanks from beyond their reach, assume dominance of the South African state of Sudan and stop any pirate raids in the (clearly southern) Horn of Africa region.

 

Gaze at it's glory.

 

zumwalt-ddg1000-05.jpg

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