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https://www.vitalykuzmin.net/Military/Dress-rehearsal-of-2021-Moscow-Victory-Day-Parade/i-tN6C8KR

 

   Wheeled death traps

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   Typhoon K-4386 / KAMAZ-4386 Typhoon-VDV with 32V01 RCWS

 

Spoiler

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   Patrol MRAP, in MP paintjob

 

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   Ural-VV MRAP for Rosgvardia

 

   Tracked

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   BMP-2M Berezhok.

 

Spoiler

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   BMP-3 with Sodema sight.

 

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   BMP-4M

 

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   T-72B3M

 

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   T-80BVM

 

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   T-90M

 

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16 minutes ago, Collimatrix said:

@Beer I have a question for the beardiest of Eastern Bloc tank grognards.  What coaxial MG did Czech-made T-55s and T-72s use in Czech service?  PKT or UK Vz. 59T?

 

PKT. 

 

The letter T in UK vz.59T doesn't mean the same as for PK. It's not "Tank" but "Těžký" which means "heavy". It's a variant with heavy and longer barrel, a tripod and a larger ammo case (for 250 rounds). AFAIK it was used only on extrenal vehicle mounts in rather distant past (OT-810, OT-62 or various light vehicles but not on tanks). 

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42 minutes ago, Collimatrix said:

Were there ever problems with logistics because the tank MGs and infantry MGs didn't use the same belts?

 

I don't know but I don't think so. 

 

The infantry used the UK-59 but armoured vehicles used PK (even infantry version on external mounts on some Soviet vehicles), later they used PKM also in door-mounts of Mi-17, on land Rovers or HMMWW, MaxxPro in Afghanistan and Iraq. The UK-59 isn't the best weapon around and the troops going into combat zones often selected other weapons and the special forces used basically whatever they wanted. I would say they have been used to have mess in ammo and belts... 

 

Today the army uses a really wild mess of UK-59 (being phased out), PKM/T (except for the PKT in T-72M4CZ it will be replaced too), Minimi, M240, M60E4, few MG3 (on Dingo) and even M134 in Mi-17... Nowadays they buy only Minimi in both 7,62 and 5,56 (much less of them) for the infantry. 

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50 minutes ago, AssaultPlazma said:

BMP-4? When did the BMP-4 come out? Also I didn't realize the RGF already had some T-90M/T-80BVM tanks in inventory. 

On 5/13/2021 at 10:59 AM, LoooSeR said:
  Hide contents

 

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   BMP-4M

 


It’s a typo, that’s a BMD-4M

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Hi all. I  need help please! Does anybody know  the exhaust on the right side, near the rear of the tank is for? I can't find any source with that information. Also does is there a good labeled diagram anywhere of the T-64 by any chance? Thanks for your time.

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2 minutes ago, wairoa said:

Hi all. I  need help please! Does anybody know  the exhaust on the right side, near the rear of the tank is for? I can't find any source with that information. Also does is there a good labeled diagram anywhere of the T-64 by any chance? Thanks for your time.

It's a standard engine exhaust port.  

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1 minute ago, AssaultPlazma said:

It's a standard engine exhaust port.  

Thanks for the quick response. Much appreciated. Do you know why this exhaust is different from the ones at the rear of the vehicle? Is it an exhaust for a motor for the turret maybe? In front of it are those storage boxes over the tracks?

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Just now, wairoa said:

Thanks for the quick response. Much appreciated. Do you know why this exhaust is different from the ones at the rear of the vehicle? Is it an exhaust for a motor for the turret maybe? In front of it are those storage boxes over the tracks?

USSR and RU tanks have transversely mounted engines meaning they're mounting "sideways". 

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5 minutes ago, AssaultPlazma said:

USSR and RU tanks have transversely mounted engines meaning they're mounting "sideways". 

Ah thanks. When I was a watching a You tube video it showed them with that exhaust port on the side, but also with exhausts at the rear of the tank. Are these exhausts on the side and rear for the same engine?

 

 

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1 hour ago, wairoa said:

Ah thanks. When I was a watching a You tube video it showed them with that exhaust port on the side, but also with exhausts at the rear of the tank. Are these exhausts on the side and rear for the same engine?

 

 

A feature of USSR tanks that may exist to this day is something called engine smoke screen. Basically it's just pouring some fuel into the exhaust in order to produce white smoke behind the tank. If I had to take a guess the rear exhaust is primarily for the smoke screen function but still serves as a secondary exhaust point regardless. 

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21 hours ago, AssaultPlazma said:

A feature of USSR tanks that may exist to this day is something called engine smoke screen. Basically it's just pouring some fuel into the exhaust in order to produce white smoke behind the tank. If I had to take a guess the rear exhaust is primarily for the smoke screen function but still serves as a secondary exhaust point regardless. 

Very cool information. Thanks a lot for that. That does make sense.

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On 5/25/2021 at 6:17 AM, wairoa said:

Ah thanks. When I was a watching a You tube video it showed them with that exhaust port on the side, but also with exhausts at the rear of the tank. Are these exhausts on the side and rear for the same engine?

 

 

 

   Engine roof plate is part of ejection cooling system.

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   Engine in front, on the background - "roof" section of engine compartment, it combines cooling system, water and oil radiators, boxy thing on the right of rear section is part of air intake.

   I think what we see is exhaust from gas turbine, which is part of air compression system. Gas turbine is powered by exhaust gases fron cylinders. During start, at low temperatures and low compressions fuel isn't burned cleanly, which probably creates this smoke.

 

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   1 is Gas turbine that power air compressor/supercharger

 

   It is also possible that oil got into airfilters (one of problems of Kharkovite engine comparmtent design), which contributes to smoke in engine cooling system exhaust.

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On 5/26/2021 at 7:45 AM, LoooSeR said:

 

   Engine roof plate is part of ejection cooling system.

image

   Engine in front, on the background - "roof" section of engine compartment, it combines cooling system, water and oil radiators, boxy thing on the right of rear section is part of air intake.

   I think what we see is exhaust from gas turbine, which is part of air compression system. Gas turbine is powered by exhaust gases fron cylinders. During start, at low temperatures and low compressions fuel isn't burned cleanly, which probably creates this smoke.

 

image

   1 is Gas turbine that power air compressor/supercharger

 

   It is also possible that oil got into airfilters (one of problems of Kharkovite engine comparmtent design), which contributes to smoke in engine cooling system exhaust.

Amazing! Thanks for this info.

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Was always just a question of time when someone comes up with Jammer for APS radars.

 

https://btvtinfo.blogspot.com/2021/06/blog-post.html

 

Patent drawing for UGV ATGM, Jammer team-up

 A method for the integrated use of robotic weapons of fire destruction and electronic suppression of the active protection system of armored vehicles.

00000002.jpg

 

 

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