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   ZIL-118 "Youth" was a unique phenomenon for the domestic auto industry, and for the world too. This bus was created with parts of the government limousine ZIL-111, while the bus even served as a minibus taxi. For its time, vehicle was more than interesting, and it is more pleasant that such a machine was restored to a very good condition. One of the not very numerous light spots of the domestic auto industry.

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35 minutes ago, Oedipus Wreckx-n-Effect said:

Looks like I'm replacing the half shaft, pads, and rotors on my truck as well. Picking it up tomorrow. That kicked the cost up a bit.

 

That sucks. 

 

I once took an 84 Blazer in for an alignment, it wandered and the steering was sloppy, steering box was not broke out of the frame and the rage joint was good. The guy doing the work was a pal I grew up with and did stuff at cost, so I knew I wasn't getting ripped off.  He calls, and said, it would align, to much wheel play, maybe the wheel bearings were shot. I say whatever, just let me know, he calls me back and says, it needs wheel bearings, and HUBS, because the wheel bearings had not been serviced, and the races were loose in the hubs. The guy I bought it from thought maintenance meant fixing it when it broke... Anyway,  I helped put it all back together when I got off work, and luckily the auto locking hubs were in like new condition, lol and went right in and I never once had a problem with them. 

 

I traded an AR-15 for this thing, so it was still a good deal, but it had other lack of maintenance woes I had to fix, and ultimately lead to its demise.   The funniest thing about the truck is the previous owner was like 6,3 350, and had bent the seat frame back.  I got in the back seat and bent it back into place, but the frame was weakened and over time it would slowly tilt back. So I cut a 2 by 4 to fit and wedged it into the back seat.  I had class back then. 

 

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13 hours ago, Jeeps_Guns_Tanks said:

 

That sucks. 

 

I once took an 84 Blazer in for an alignment, it wandered and the steering was sloppy, steering box was not broke out of the frame and the rage joint was good. The guy doing the work was a pal I grew up with and did stuff at cost, so I knew I wasn't getting ripped off.  He calls, and said, it would align, to much wheel play, maybe the wheel bearings were shot. I say whatever, just let me know, he calls me back and says, it needs wheel bearings, and HUBS, because the wheel bearings had not been serviced, and the races were loose in the hubs. The guy I bought it from thought maintenance meant fixing it when it broke... Anyway,  I helped put it all back together when I got off work, and luckily the auto locking hubs were in like new condition, lol and went right in and I never once had a problem with them. 

 

I traded an AR-15 for this thing, so it was still a good deal, but it had other lack of maintenance woes I had to fix, and ultimately lead to its demise.   The funniest thing about the truck is the previous owner was like 6,3 350, and had bent the seat frame back.  I got in the back seat and bent it back into place, but the frame was weakened and over time it would slowly tilt back. So I cut a 2 by 4 to fit and wedged it into the back seat.  I had class back then. 

 

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Haha nice! It's crazy the kind of effect it makes.

 

I ran to the shop this morning (literally) and picked up the truck. My God, the difference is night and day. It handles five times better I swear. Feels smoother down the road. And they priced me fair for what they did. 

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Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith 

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   This car was made in 1956 by the British car body maker Hooper & Co. commissioned by the French businessman Nubar Gulbenkian. The car was manufactured on a Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith chassis with a wheelbase of 3,300 mm and a 4.9-liter l6 engine, as well as a transparent plexiglass roof.

 

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Volvo: "Safety? Fuck safety, we don't want to spend on safety!"

 

Volvo 1800ES. 

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   The Volvo 1800ES twin-seat wagon is a development of the Volvo 1800 coupe, which was mass-produced since 1963. Unlike previous versions, the new version received a luggage compartment of increased volume, closed with a frameless glass door. In the early stages, the 1800ES variants created by Italian designers Sergio Coggiola and Pietro Frua were considered, however, the leadership of the Swedish concern considered these models to be too futuristic, and they preferred the project of the chief designer of the concern Jan Wilsgaard.

   The wagon was launched into mass production in 1972. The car was equipped with a 4-cylinder in-line engine of 1,986 cc and 123 hp. The car could be equipped with a 4-speed manual or 3-speed automatic transmissions.

   Serial production of the Volvo 1800ES did not last long - in 1973, the Volvo 1800 was removed from the assembly line after 8,078 cars made. The reason for this decision was the tightening of safety requirements for cars in the United States and the reluctance of Volvo management to invest in upgrading vehicle to meet these new standards.

 

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55 minutes ago, LoooSeR said:

Volvo: "Safety? Fuck safety, we don't want to spend on safety!"

 

Volvo 1800ES. 

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Many foreign makers pulled out of the U.S. market as a result of those dubious "safety" standards.

 

Ever wonder why some like the MG or the 240/260 Z ended up with silly looking bumpers?

"Safety Standards". (Meant more to reduce insurance payouts for minor fender-benders, as the telescoping "battering ram" bumpers were useless in much other than the slowest of collisions)

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I took my car into the garage today, to do some general maintenance.  Was going to change the break liquid, but I bought the wrong type. So I tried changing oil, but the drain plug was so stuck and hard to get that I needed to lift the car, and since I lacked the stands to have it on, so waited with that too.  Then I began changing the drum break pads. I could not find the lift point, so in my half hypothermic, half feverish state I mistook the side channel for the lift point and did this:

 

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After swearing a lot and getting a better jack, I found the correct point and starting dismounting the drum breaks. 

 

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Of course, one of the nuts for the wheel got stuck in the wrench, which a had to knock lose with a hammer and screwdriver. 

 

 

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After a lot of messing with the breaks to get the got damn pads of, I could not get the drum on.  Furious beyond belief, I went in to defrost and ease my back pain.  Now I feel very sick. 

 

All in all, a typical day, working on the car in -12 C. 

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3 hours ago, Xoon said:

hhP8XvT.jpg

 

I took my car into the garage today, to do some general maintenance.  Was going to change the break liquid, but I bought the wrong type. So I tried changing oil, but the drain plug was so stuck and hard to get that I needed to lift the car, and since I lacked the stands to have it on, so waited with that too.  Then I began changing the drum break pads. I could not find the lift point, so in my half hypothermic, half feverish state I mistook the side channel for the lift point and did this:

 

KE1vULL.jpg

 

 

After swearing a lot and getting a better jack, I found the correct point and starting dismounting the drum breaks. 

 

xVPMdww.jpg

 

Of course, one of the nuts for the wheel got stuck in the wrench, which a had to knock lose with a hammer and screwdriver. 

 

 

0n41V4r.jpg

 

After a lot of messing with the breaks to get the got damn pads of, I could not get the drum on.  Furious beyond belief, I went in to defrost and ease my back pain.  Now I feel very sick. 

 

All in all, a typical day, working on the car in -12 C. 

Most (SAE/DOT) brake fluids are interchangeable, barring the more exotic fluids like pure silicone, etc.

That aside, easy way to "change" the fluid is to rig up a suction jar using a vacuum.

Use a large glass jar, pole two holes in the lid. One for the "inlet" and one for the vacuum.  Use plastic tube, run one long line through the lid, and then a shorter one to the crevice tool of the vacuum. Seal this with tape, and make sure it just pokes through the lid.

The "suction" line needs to almost reach the bottom of the jar.

 

Now fire up the vacuum and suck the fluid from the brake master cylinder reservoir. Add clean fluid.  if you're really worried, stick the end of the sucker hose over the bleeders and crack them with the vac running. Have someone add fluid at the top, and  pull a vac on the jar til you see clean fluid.  Do this on all four wheels.

 

The damage is from rust.Misplacing the jack just pointed it out.

 

Four Ways are shit on anything other than solid lugs. Use a socket and breaker bar to get them off (especially since every shop out there loves putting MAXIMUM HAMFIST on the nuts with a 1/2" impact).

 

Those are the first automotive drums I've seen with no (visible) adjuster.

Normally you back the adjuster off when installing new shoes, to allow the (likely unturned)  drum to go on easily.  Then you'd mount the wheel, spin it and bring the adjuster up til it drags, then back it off 3~5 "clicks".

 

See if there is an adjusting wedge on the anchors or similar to allow one to adjust the shoes, and back it off.

 

 

Oh, and for really stuck drain plugs?

Buy a new one, then use a big pair of vise grips to take the old one out.  If it starts coming out hard, you have serious issues, and some fuckwit has overtorqued the drainbolt, and you may need a new pan, (or  a Helicoil or to chase the threads with a tap.).

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Finally got the drum on, found the adjuster. 

 

 

19 hours ago, Meplat said:

Most (SAE/DOT) brake fluids are interchangeable, barring the more exotic fluids like pure silicone, etc.

So you believe that replacing  the break fluid from DOT 3 to DOT 4 is safe? 

It says on the container: "ONLY USE DOT 3". The car is pretty old though, 1995-1999 model. 

 

 

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That aside, easy way to "change" the fluid is to rig up a suction jar using a vacuum.

Use a large glass jar, pole two holes in the lid. One for the "inlet" and one for the vacuum.  Use plastic tube, run one long line through the lid, and then a shorter one to the crevice tool of the vacuum. Seal this with tape, and make sure it just pokes through the lid.

The "suction" line needs to almost reach the bottom of the jar.

 

Now fire up the vacuum and suck the fluid from the brake master cylinder reservoir. Add clean fluid.  if you're really worried, stick the end of the sucker hose over the bleeders and crack them with the vac running. Have someone add fluid at the top, and  pull a vac on the jar til you see clean fluid.  Do this on all four wheels.

I do have a oil pump, do you think it could do the same job? 

 

 

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The damage is from rust.Misplacing the jack just pointed it out.

That is true, it makes me feel better, since I would have to remove the rust anyways. Going to remove the rust and weld shut the hole. I am thinking about just gluing on plate though. 

 

For now I just taped over the hole to stop snow and mud from getting into the channel. Luckily it is not actually the structural channel, just exterior cosmetics. 

 

 

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Four Ways are shit on anything other than solid lugs. Use a socket and breaker bar to get them off (especially since every shop out there loves putting MAXIMUM HAMFIST on the nuts with a 1/2" impact).

Yeah, its pretty shit, I am going to get a better tool soon.  And yeah, the concept of "correct torque" is non existent here. A friend of mine literally used all his weight and force to tightened his wheels.  Poor threads. 

 

 

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Those are the first automotive drums I've seen with no (visible) adjuster.

Normally you back the adjuster off when installing new shoes, to allow the (likely unturned)  drum to go on easily.  Then you'd mount the wheel, spin it and bring the adjuster up til it drags, then back it off 3~5 "clicks".

 

See if there is an adjusting wedge on the anchors or similar to allow one to adjust the shoes, and back it off.

2peMJlu.jpg

 

I found the adjuster, hidden in between there. Messed with it for a bit. It was adjusted all the way out, explaining why I could not get on the pads. Though it is a pain to accurately adjust loved to jump several teeth. 

 

 

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Oh, and for really stuck drain plugs?

Buy a new one, then use a big pair of vise grips to take the old one out.  If it starts coming out hard, you have serious issues, and some fuckwit has overtorqued the drainbolt, and you may need a new pan, (or  a Helicoil or to chase the threads with a tap.).

The problem is that the plug broke, snapped in half. Now the hole is permanently plugged. I either I drill it out and tap a new thread, or I just replace the entire thing. Its only a L shaped metal piece, so I might find the part laying around. 

 

 

16 hours ago, Oedipus Wreckx-n-Effect said:

@Xoon do you have drum brakes on all four wheels?

No, ventilated discs at front, and drums in the rear. So all the shoes are equal length. 

 

The car is a Mazda 323F GLX 1,8L (BA) (EU) 1998 model. 

 

 

 

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Does anyone know what this is? The cog and the tap sticking out. 

It is connected with a hose/cable. 

 

My car lacks ABS or traction control, but it could be bought originally as extra equipment. 

Is it the ABS sensor? 

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Its a metal piece, close to the metal cog connected to the axle. On the opposite side there is a cable connected with a nipple that looks way to flimsy to be a hydraulic coupling. There is also another hose which is way beefier which looks exactly like a hydraulic hose. Considering it is a single acting piston, it should not need more than one hose. 

 

The thing looks like a crude axle pulse encoder, basically every time the metal piece passes the cog teeth, a metal sensor detects the metal and sends a pulse to the ECU/ABS controller/thing and it counts it. 360 degrees equal the amount of teeth, the more teeth, the higher resolution.

 

Its either the cars wheel speed sensor or the ABS wheel speed sensor or both.

 

Found this:
abs-speed-sensor-image.jpg

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I agree, ABS sensors normally do double duty to run the speedo.

 

1 hour ago, Xoon said:
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The problem is that the plug broke, snapped in half. Now the hole is permanently plugged. I either I drill it out and tap a new thread, or I just replace the entire thing. Its only a L shaped metal piece, so I might find the part laying around. 

 

A left handed drill might get it out

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On 1/20/2019 at 12:56 PM, Xoon said:

FmTvqwJ.jpg

 

Finally got the drum on, found the adjuster. 

 

 

So you believe that replacing  the break fluid from DOT 3 to DOT 4 is safe? 

It says on the container: "ONLY USE DOT 3". The car is pretty old though, 1995-1999 model. 

 

 

I do have a oil pump, do you think it could do the same job? 

 

 

That is true, it makes me feel better, since I would have to remove the rust anyways. Going to remove the rust and weld shut the hole. I am thinking about just gluing on plate though. 

 

For now I just taped over the hole to stop snow and mud from getting into the channel. Luckily it is not actually the structural channel, just exterior cosmetics. 

 

 

Yeah, its pretty shit, I am going to get a better tool soon.  And yeah, the concept of "correct torque" is non existent here. A friend of mine literally used all his weight and force to tightened his wheels.  Poor threads. 

 

 

2peMJlu.jpg

 

I found the adjuster, hidden in between there. Messed with it for a bit. It was adjusted all the way out, explaining why I could not get on the pads. Though it is a pain to accurately adjust loved to jump several teeth. 

 

 

The problem is that the plug broke, snapped in half. Now the hole is permanently plugged. I either I drill it out and tap a new thread, or I just replace the entire thing. Its only a L shaped metal piece, so I might find the part laying around. 

 

DOT3 and DOT4 are (as far a 99% of those using either are concerned) interchangeable, and compatable.

 

A vacuum pulls a constant, that's what you want. You don't need a high vacuum, just a steady one.

My first "power bleeder" used an old tube evacuator, the stem from a tube, and a pickle jar. And a lot of RTV silicone.

 

For a temporary fix, score some of the aluminum foil tape used for AC service.  Clean the area well, and put a layer on top and bottom, then bias.

For a longer term fix,  flattened coffee cans and a pop riveter, plus roofing asphalt will last an amazingly long time.

 

As to the drain plug, I'd just plan for a new pan. You can still change the oil, you just need a bit of stiff tube that will slip down the dipstick tube, and reach the bottom of the pan. Then use your improvised brake bleeder, scaled up to a 5 gallon bucket with a tight lid.  (This is actually how a lot of modern cars do oil changes, by sucking the oil out the dipstick tube).

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19 minutes ago, Oedipus Wreckx-n-Effect said:



Physics is hard, guys.

Wiish I'd recorded the time I pulled down a huge palm with the M-37. 

Just ran a chain from a deadman to the front lifting eyes, then  used the winch to pull the tree over. 

All with maybe 100 HP, and no asshattery.

 

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58 minutes ago, Oedipus Wreckx-n-Effect said:



Physics is hard, guys.

 

I've pulled stumps with trucks before.

 

*Shrug*

 

Edit: Now the dude trying to pull an old growth stump with a Landcruiser was special...

 

Edit Edit: Also fuckers are standing too close to the tow chains/straps...

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13 minutes ago, Donward said:

 

I've pulled stumps with trucks before.

 

*Shrug*

 

Edit: Now the dude trying to pull an old growth stump with a Landcruiser was special...

 

Edit Edit: Also fuckers are standing too close to the tow chains/straps...

 

They are ok, cause Mythbusters said people being hurt by flying broken wire ropes is a myth!

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Ravaillier Canot-Voiture-Touriste amphibious car.

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   This car was created in 1907 by the French inventor Jules Julien Ravalier. In fact it was all-metal boat mounted on wheels. The amphibian had rear-wheel drive, was equipped with a "Gontallier" 20-horsepower 4-cylinder gasoline engine, had a three speed manual transmission; on the water it was moving using a propeller. The wheels of the car were made of galvanized steel and had rubber tires. Only single vehicle was made.

 

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