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Sturgeon

Swords And Their Historical Context

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As interesting as their shop is, I really have a hard time with all the modern shit they use to make those blades. Seriously, using a fucking belt sander on a repro Ulfberht? You couldn't have broken out the emory cloth and done it by hand, even if just for the final polish?

I shouldn't be ornery about it, but it ruins something about the presentation and the product, to me.

Oh well, at least it's not "hurr durr cut it out of stock!" like the original series.

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Lloyd has a video on these interesting short Chinese swords:
 

 

This article has more, including a summary of some historical examples.  It appears that historical examples of the weapons had a much wider variety of blade shapes than the relatively standardized form used by modern Wing Chun practitioners.

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Just got around to watching the above.  I noticed a few things:

 

-The Khukri's shape allows two blade blanks to be cut out of the same piece of steel plate (leaf springs from a vehicle, I'm guessing) head to toe.

-Fullers look like they would have been a stone cold bitch to make on historical swords made without the benefit of electric grinders.

-GAAAAHHH the lack of safety equipment and fixtures when making the handle made my hair stand up.

-The material makes some fascinating sounds when the tang is inserted into the handle.

-The blade edge is quenched using the POWER OF TEAPOTS?  I see that the Nepalese were sly, and learned from their imperial masters.

-The cho is added rather unceremoniously using a grinder.

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15 minutes ago, Collimatrix said:

Just got around to watching the above.  I noticed a few things:

 

-The Khukri's shape allows two blade blanks to be cut out of the same piece of steel plate (leaf springs from a vehicle, I'm guessing) head to toe.

-Fullers look like they would have been a stone cold bitch to make on historical swords made without the benefit of electric grinders.

-GAAAAHHH the lack of safety equipment and fixtures when making the handle made my hair stand up.

-The material makes some fascinating sounds when the tang is inserted into the handle.

-The blade edge is quenched using the POWER OF TEAPOTS?  I see that the Nepalese were sly, and learned from their imperial masters.

-The cho is added rather unceremoniously using a grinder.

Fullers can be hammered in, but otherwise I agree.

 

From what I know about forging these things shouldn't be properly hardened, let alone tempered. The colour on the blade before quenching is way too low according to what I know. Which is probably all for the best, given how they go about quenching.

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