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It is time to explain The Aglockalypse.

 

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This is the handgun that killed handgun design in the West.  Nobody has had any new ideas worth mentioning on the mechanical design of service handguns since this design came out.  Almost every major arms manufacturer in the West makes what is materially a Glock clone; albeit with a few small embellishments and their own logo stamped on the side.

 

What Makes a Glock a Glock?

 

Almost every mechanical contrivance in small arms design was invented about one hundred years ago by some Austro-Hungarian noble you've never heard of or by John Moses Browning.  It's about 50/50.  Most of small arms design these days consists of applying new materials and manufacturing techniques to old ideas (which may have been unworkable at the time), or by taking a lot of old ideas from different sources and mixing them together in some way that's complimentary.  The Glock pistol design is no exception; the ideas were not novel, but putting them all together proved an absolutely world-beating combination.

 

1)  Polymer Frame

 

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An H&K VP-70, the first production polymer-framed pistol.

 

Polymer-framed pistols were not an original idea, but at the debut of the Glock 17 they were still a fairly new idea.  Glock proved the concept to be mature, and it provided the Glock with a huge advantage over the competition.

Traditional metal-framed pistols are made by taking a hunk of metal, either a casting, billet or forging, and cutting away everything that isn't pistol-shaped:

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This translates to a lot of machine time and a lot of expensive alloys that end up as shavings on the floor.  The frame of the Glock was much faster and cheaper to make.  Some metal inserts were put into an injection mold (which admittedly is an expensive device, but you pay for it once), and then hot, liquid plastic was squirted into this cavity to form the frame.  The entire process takes less than a minute.  Cost-wise there is no way for a metal-framed pistol to compete with a polymer-framed one, apples to apples.  For very large contracts the math tilts even further in favor of injection molding, since one-time capital costs are a large percentage of injection molding costs while ongoing costs are smaller, while ongoing costs for machining stay largely the same.  Gaston Glock was very aggressive about pursuing large contracts (notably the NYPD, which was an early coup), which helped him best use this advantage.
 

2)  The Glock locking system

 

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Glocks use a linkless Browning tilting-barrel short recoil system and lock the slide to the barrel via a large rectangular lug machined into the barrel that fits into the ejection port.  Glocks were the second major pistol design to combine these two concepts, the first being the SiG P220 series.JgBD7mJ.jpg

Ejection port of a Webley automatic pistol, showing the square breech section of the barrel locked to the slide via the ejection port.  The barrel translates diagonally.

 

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Cross section of a Browning hi-power.  This was the first mass-produced pistol to use the linkless short recoil system.  The barrel locks to the slide via a series of rings in the barrel that tilt into corresponding grooves in the slide.

 

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SiG P220

This operating system is robust and reliable, and fairly easy to manufacture.  It has a few theoretical flaws, such as the barrel being slightly off-angle during the extraction of the spent case, the pivot sitting below the barrel and thereby raising the bore axis, and the necessary clearances for the movement of the barrel degrading accuracy.  In practice these objections are immaterial.  Glocks are absurdly reliable, have a low enough bore axis and only a unusually skilled shooters would notice the mechanical contributions of the precision of the pistol over their own wobbling aim.

 

3)  The Glock Fire Control System

 

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The Glock fire control group is an elegant combination of several ideas.  Again, most of the ideas in the Glock fire control group had antecedents, but their combination and execution in the Glock was very clever.  The trigger transfer bar is a complex shape, but it is stamped from sheet metal and so quite cheap to produce.  It also combines several functions into a single piece, including enough safeties that Glocks are reasonably safe to carry even though they lack an external safety.

 

The complete lack of a machined metal hammer, and the clever trigger dingus-lever were also cost savings over traditional pistol design.

 

There are several other incidental design features of the Glock pistol, but these three are in my opinion the ones that allowed it to gobble up market share because they economized manufacture.  They are also the three features that the overwhelming majority of Western pistols designed since the Early '80s copy unashamedly.

 

Victims of the Aglockalypse

 

When Gaston Glock first entered his creation in the Austrian Army pistol competition, nobody in arms design had heard of the guy.  Longstanding Austrian arms company Steyr was quite confident that their own GB pistol would win the competition.

 

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This is basically the pistol equivalent of the couple making out in the back of a convertible at night in a horror movie.  It is remembered only as the first in a long list of casualties.

 

Instead, not only was the Steyr GB to lose the competition, but it would fade from the marketplace without making much of an impression anywhere.  This is a shame, in my opinion, because the Steyr GB has a few good ideas that deserve a second look, such as the two-position-feed magazines (seen otherwise only in rifles, SMGs and Russian pistol designs), and the truckbed-liner crinkle finish.  The design also has some good features for economy of production and excellent mechanical precision, but really, on the whole, it's completely inferior to the Glock.  These pistols have a really poor reputation for being unreliable and wearing out quickly, and while Steyr fans will claim this is in large part due to inferior license-produced versions from the United States, nobody argues that even the Steyr-made GBs have anything on the nearly bomb-proof Glock.  Also, they're enormous.

 

As far as the Glock was concerned, the Steyr GB was just the first blood.  It wasn't enough to best a local competitor; the Glock would obsolete an entire generation of automatic pistol designs.

 

In neighboring Germany, Heckler and Koch's flagship pistol offering was the P7.  The P7 has many admirable features.  Like the Steyr GB it has a fixed barrel and excellent mechanical precision.  It is also very slim and has an extremely low bore axis.  It also has the most hideously complicated fire control system ever seen in a pistol that isn't a revolver:

 

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A pistol like the P7 could simply never be made cost-competitive with the Glock, much less by a company like HK which usually errs on the side of high performance rather than low cost.

 

Walther, the other big German small arms manufacturer, was busy making the P5:

 

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No, the picture isn't reversed.  The ejection port is indeed on the left side of the P5, which is because the P5 is nothing more than a slightly re-worked P38 of World War Two vintage.  The frame is aluminum, the barrel is shorter and the fire control group has some detail improvements, but it's otherwise the same, right down to the dubious rotating-block locking system.  It didn't even have a double-column magazine.  Just another outdated design for the Glock to drop-kick into the dustbin of history.

 

Longtime Belgian designer FNH was pushing the Browning BDA, a pistol so boring that I can barely write about it while remaining awake.

 

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This is basically a Browning hi-power with a double action trigger somehow shoehorned in.  Given how the Browning hi-power trigger works, this is not exactly a straightforward conversion, and this would invite curiousity were it not for the fact that this pistol carries with it a highly stiffling aura of impenetrable boringness.  I seriously cannot bring myself to care.

 

Across the Atlantic, in gun-happy America the Glock would face stiff competition from hardened, skillful American firms that had more to offer than face-lifted wartime designs and botique gas-delayed guns.  The rugged American outlook on law enforcement provided a stiffly competitive market for quality peace officers' weapons.  

 

Haha, I kid.  They were just as complacent and mediocre as everyone else.

 

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Sturm Ruger Co, one of only two publicly traded firearms manufacturers in the US, released their P-series of pistols in the mid eighties.  It seems a little uncharitable to list these chunky pistols as victims of Glock superiority, since they sold in decent numbers and aren't terrible.  But victims they were; the design was simply outdated.

The strangest feature of the P-series pistols is that the older designs in the family use a swinging link to cam the barrel in and out of engagement with the slide.  While the swinging cam arrangement works well enough, and several fine weapons use it (e.g. 1911, Tokarev), with modern materials and manufacturing tolerances the linkless system is simply better because it doesn't produce the grinding movement caused by the short radius of the link swinging radius, and because it has fewer parts.

 

The P series was also reasonably cost-competitive because most of the parts are cast before machining to final dimensions.  Sturm Ruger has exceptional expertise in firearms castings, which has long given them the edge in pricing.  Castings can be made very closely to the final shapes required, which saves a lot of machining time.  However, this gives many of their designs a bloated, water-retaining look.

 

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The other publicly traded firm, Smith and Wesson, was doing reasonably well with a whole family of automatic pistols that I absolutely do not care about.  They have names that end in "9", have generally Browning-ish insides, and the single stacks look pretty and elegant.  There are also some double stack variants, and some are in stainless.  Something something unbuttoned pastel shirts, designer Italian pants and cocaine.  Oh look, there goes my mind, wandering again because these pistols are BORING, MEDIOCRE AND I HAVE MORE IMPORTANT THINGS TO CARE ABOUT.

 

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OH LOOK IT'S ANOTHER PRE-GLOCK SINGLE STACK METAL FRAMED PISTOL.  This time it's from Colt.  It is a well-documented fact that Colt's senior management spent the entire 1980's doing nothing but licking their own genitals like cats.  I don't even know what this pistol is called.  Do you know what it's called?  Do you care?  Do you think Colt's management cared?  Of course not.  So let's make up a name.  We'll call it... the Colt Elantra.

 

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This Colt pistol is more interesting, and has an operatic history.  Unfortunately, that opera is Wagner's Ring Cycle.  Nobody did anything that made sense, and by the end there was a fat lady singing and then everything burned to the ground.

 

The pistol was originally designed by Reed Knight and Eugene Stoner, who were by that time already living legends for designing the combat robots that crushed the communist menace decisively at the Battle of Arrakis.  The design was mechanically fascinating, featuring an unusual rotating barrel, roller-bearing supported striker fire control group, polymer frame with screw-on grips, and an unusual, but very appealing slide stop design.

 

Alas, Colt completely screwed up the design by making it too big, making the trigger pull too long and too heavy, and by making it not work.  Even without the stiff competition from Glock, the design would have been an ignominious failure.

 

All of the above designs, though in some cases initially successful, would face dwindling market share against the cheaper-to produce Glocks.  Their respective firms sat down and quickly came to the conclusion that they were not as clever as Gaston Glock, but that was OK since he had done the clever for them.

 

Saint Gaston Converts the Industry to Glocktholicism

 

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The first of the Glock clones to hit the market, the S&W Sigma is so similar to the Glock that some of the parts will interchange:

 

This resulted in some drama, hasty design changes and a settlement payment for an undisclosed amount.

 

Next came the Walther P99:

 

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This pistol introduced the interchangeable backstrap, which was generally considered a good idea.  It also introduced several option trigger modules, including a DA/SA version with a decocker button on top of the slide.  This is bid'ah, and heresy against the Glockspel.  The great genius of the Glock is that it's simpler and cheaper to produce than competing designs.  One cannot successfully outcompete the Glock by taking a Glock and adding a bunch of extra shit to it.  Then you just have a more expensive Glock, which, ipso facto, will not outcompete an Orthodox Glock.

 

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HK was, until recently, one of the last holdouts of Albigensianism hammer-fired handguns, being unable for some time to bring themselves to make an unabashed Glock clone.  However, their USP series is, compared to their previous offerings, quite Glocky.  They have switched to the Browning short-recoil, linkless tilting barrel design with a barrel that locks to the slide through the ejection port.

 

By 2014, however, HK had entered into full Glockmmunion, and introduced the VP9; a striker-fired, polymer framed pistol:

 

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FNH of Belgium initially responded with the FN Forty-Nine, which is like a Glock but with a DAO trigger:

 

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However, they swiftly recanted of their error and introduced the FNP, FNX and finally the FNS, an all-but-Orthodox Glock clone:

 

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Steyr introduced the M9 series of pistols, which were actually designed by a former Glock employee!  These are basically Glocks, but slanted, with weird sights and that say "Steyr" on the side instead of "Glock."

Steyr_M-A1_M40-A1_mit_1_Magazin_und_Bloc

 

 

In 2007, Ruger was converted and introduced the SR-9:

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In 2005, S&W made a slightly more refined clone called the M&P:

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There are several versions now, including some for blasphemers that have external safeties.

 

Colt has yet to introduce a Glock clone; their strategy regarding this portion of the handgun market remains enigmatic.

 

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Survivors

 

For various reasons, a few metal-framed designs have survived and remain commercially competitive.  But there is reason to think that their days are numbered.

 

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The Beretta M92 series is mechanically rather similar to the Walther P-39, except it has a double stack magazine.  The widespread adoption of this essentially sound, but uninspired design, by many militaries not the least of which is the US Army, has bought the design staying power.  However, the recent announcement that Beretta, too, has discovered how to stencil their own name on to the side of a Glock shows that they haven't come up with anything better either.

 

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The CZ-75 design continues on as well, in no small part because producing a CZ-75 clone is a right of passage in Turkey that all adolescents must pass in order to be recognized as men.

 

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Turkish CZ-75 clones are so common at firearms trade shows that they are often used for paperweights and juggling.  When there is heavy snow it is common to keep a bucket of Turkish CZ-75 clones handy to pour onto icy patches to get better traction for a stuck vehicle.

 

But the latest offering from CZ proper, the CZ P-09 is beginning to look a lot like Glock-mas:

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Polymer frame, barrel that locks into the ejection port...  It keeps the distinctive CZ-75 slide-inside-frame and fire control group, but it's more like a Glock than a CZ-75 is.  The trendline is unmistakable.

 

There are a few other hold-outs, but by and large the firearms industry has found Glock's recipe to be compelling.  To be cost-competitive, new designs copy these innovations to a greater, rather than a lesser degree.  This has meant a stultifying lack of creativity amongst pistol manufacturers, as more and more of them decide that their best bet is to copy a thirty five year old design.

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Saint Colli, while you have made an excellent tribute to our Messiah Gaston Glock, I believe you forgot some designs.

 

Design that was also arguably killed. (Colt SSP)

 

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Other companies falling in line and joining the religion of the striker fired master race.

 

SIG P320

 

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Another shitty gun that should be excommunicated for the crime of being incredibly shitty, the HS2000 (Springfield XDm)

 

XDM94545BHC_1200x782.png

 

 

I hope this addition pleases you Saint Colli.

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Saint Colli, while you have made an excellent tribute to our Messiah Gaston Glock, I believe you forgot some designs.

 

Design that was also arguably killed. (Colt SSP)

 

8788216_2.jpg?v=8CC7F0708FA0920

 

Other companies falling in line and joining the religion of the striker fired master race.

 

SIG P320

 

Ayoob-P320-Lead.jpg

 

Another shitty gun that should be excommunicated for the crime of being incredibly shitty, the HS2000 (Springfield XDm)

 

XDM94545BHC_1200x782.png

 

 

I hope this addition pleases you Saint Colli.

 

Oooh!  Good choices, and yes, there are many victims and clones that I did not mention.

 

You've got to wonder WTF was going on with Colt at that time.  Basically all of their automatic pistol design introductions were flops.  Rather than grit their teeth and unfuck them, they let themselves get chased out of the automatic pistol market... just in time to miss the explosion in pistol sales thanks to changes in CCW laws across most of the USA.

 

The XD has an interesting departure from the Glock where the slide actually rides on this big, machined steel insert that's pinned into the frame.  But otherwise, yeah, it's a Glock with a bunch of unnecessary crap added to it.

 

The 320 goes one better; it has a stamped insert that (it looks like from pictures) acts as the slide rails and also holds the fire control group and acts as the serialized component.  Otherwise it's fairly Glocky.

 

The idea of using a metal insert as the serialized component that has the slide rails on it is clever, and would give a manufacturer a small edge over the Glock in the US marketplace.  It's harder to injection mold a polymer frame with metal inserts in it than it is to just injection mold a solid polymer frame.

 

Furthermore, if the polymer frame is the serialized component of the gun, the ATF requires that the serial number be on a metal plaque molded into the frame.  Most firearms manufacturers don't have their own injection molding equipment, and most injection molding companies don't have a firearms manufacturing license.  So the ATF has to grant a variance in these cases.

 

By making the slide rails/FCG/serialized box a separate, pinned-in piece, SIG bypasses the FFL variance paperwork and the difficulty of molding the metal inserts into the frame.

 

It's not an enormous advantage, but at this point anyone doing anything that's actually cleverer than Glock is noteworthy.

 

How about Strike One, a Glock for those, who is sick of Glocks?

 

 

The insides of the Strike One are surprisingly un-Glocky:

 

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They made a big deal about the differences in the operating mechanism in one of their early presentations:

 

It's a little similar to how the P-38/M92 lockup works; there's an extra little piece that locks the barrel to the slide.  Instead of pivoting around the pitch axis like the P-38's locking piece it slides up and down.  Mechanically it's fine, although I don't think it has enormous practical advantages over the Glock design.  The big problem with their locking design is that it has a bunch of tiny corners that need to be machined inside the slide.  To make these tiny corners they use electrical discharge machinging (EDM), which is insanely precise and also insanely expensive.

 

So it's not a very good design from a cost-control standpoint.  Surprisingly, they've kept the price to about 1.5 Glock 17s.

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So the final stages of the Aglockalypse has come. SOCOM is basically 100% Glock now (even the Rangers and SEALS). Given this, and the pressure from Milley, Glock is likely to be selected by MHS. Glock was selected by the FBI (again).

 

In ten years, no one will remember that any other handguns existed.

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So the final stages of the Aglockalypse has come. SOCOM is basically 100% Glock now (even the Rangers and SEALS). Given this, and the pressure from Milley, Glock is likely to be selected by MHS. Glock was selected by the FBI (again).

 

In ten years, no one will remember that any other handguns existed.

Where it gets really weird is when glock accidentally releases a new model that is simply a square, plastic cut-out of a gun. And nobody notices any change in unit effectiveness.

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So the final stages of the Aglockalypse has come. SOCOM is basically 100% Glock now (even the Rangers and SEALS). Given this, and the pressure from Milley, Glock is likely to be selected by MHS. Glock was selected by the FBI (again).

 

In ten years, no one will remember that any other handguns existed.

 

I remember an unclassified writing from a Delta Force member that, like MARSOC, They were also using Glocks (either the 17 or 22 oddly enough) and STI 2011s, but stopped buying 2011s because they required a shit ton more maintenance.

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CZ, noted purveyors of not-Glocks with hammers and other things won a victory over themselves:

 

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It's a glock, with milling on the top of the slide to decrease felt recoil, and a focus on making the trigger feel good and be broken in.

 

Also, it has friend backstrap.

 

Most notable:

 

" Take-down of the P-10 will be familiar to most fans of striker-fired guns, and even more pleasing will be holster compatibility with some of the most common guns on the market. "

 

The sights look reasonably nicer than Glock standard too, and at a reasonable price. I think in a way that makes it one of the truer glocks that actually tries to be different in that it tries to improve without the addition of fiddly things.

 

I like CZ's lack of pretense about the whole thing. It's a Glock after common aftermarket mods. There ya go.

 

 

 

It looks like Remington's had a response as well in the RP9. They omitted the key features of a striker, actually reliably working with NATO ball ammo, and the only reason I know about it is my habit of looking up pistols that end up on deep sale. I also think that its ambi slide release only actually works from one side because it's weak stamped metal. In a firearms market where exciting new developments are slight elaborations upon the Glock, a Slovenian CZ99 descendent that's best described as "a lot like a P226 that's a bit more efficiently made" and the few daring souls still willing to make guns that aren't actually good, this is technically an exciting release.

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10 hours ago, Sturgeon said:

The P-10 has reportedly had a bunch of teething issues, although once these are resolved I expect it to be a quite solid market offering.

 

Trigger is nothing special tho.

 

I'm not surprised one bit. The Glock trigger seems to be perfectly acceptable, and absolutely fine once broken in. The main thing CZ talks about is basically breaking theirs in beforehand. If you've fired one, is that roughly how it feels?

 

What teething issues incidentally?

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53 minutes ago, xthetenth said:

 

I'm not surprised one bit. The Glock trigger seems to be perfectly acceptable, and absolutely fine once broken in. The main thing CZ talks about is basically breaking theirs in beforehand. If you've fired one, is that roughly how it feels?

 

What teething issues incidentally?

 

There are a bunch of different ones. You can get a sense by googling "cz p10c issues". I have faith in CZ as a company that they'll fix them, but I'd hold off if you're thinking of buying one.

 

The trigger just feels like a lighter Glock trigger, which is not very impressive to me.

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Pretty much every P-10C I've used (or bought) has worked perfectly fine for me, It's like the one G19 wannabe that actually feels noticeably better than a G19 in quite a few areas to me.

 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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That is cool, how do you like it, and what do you think it does better?

 

I'm committed to getting a G19 because it is the default choice considerably easier to get accessories and support for, and by the time I've bought more mags, a happy stick, a red dot, a milled slide, a comp and a light, support for those and a holster to fit it all (especially custom safariland kydex from valhalla) is a major trait of a gun as a part of the system.

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41 minutes ago, xthetenth said:

That is cool, how do you like it, and what do you think it does better?

 

I'm committed to getting a G19 because it is the default choice considerably easier to get accessories and support for, and by the time I've bought more mags, a happy stick, a red dot, a milled slide, a comp and a light, support for those and a holster to fit it all (especially custom safariland kydex from valhalla) is a major trait of a gun as a part of the system.

 

My advice is always: Buy Glock, and if you don't like it you can sell it.

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Yep. Plus, I'm trying to get it together before a 2-gun match at the start of February so things like waiting on custom holsters and stuff isn't happening. Instead, I got a holster that was in stock, mags that were on sale, and so on and so forth.

 

In the land of the universally competent pistol, the broad ecosystem is king.

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17 hours ago, xthetenth said:

That is cool, how do you like it, and what do you think it does better?

 

I'm committed to getting a G19 because it is the default choice considerably easier to get accessories and support for, and by the time I've bought more mags, a happy stick, a red dot, a milled slide, a comp and a light, support for those and a holster to fit it all (especially custom safariland kydex from valhalla) is a major trait of a gun as a part of the system.

 

Note that for the record, I'm not not one of the hypocritical fanboys of other polymer framed, striker fired handguns that think their copy of a Glock is just so much better for.....exactly no reason other than *brand dicksucking here*, hell, I own 2 Glocks and had 2 prior to now, and tried many of their imitators, the Walther PPQ M2 was probably my favorite but even then, I ultimately went back to a G17 (traded in a G22 to get one before that since I didn't need it.) and you'll notice I usually go for full size guns and not the "compact" G19 size frames and clones because, as this will be important for why I like the P-10C better, I have big fucking hands and this often affects my gun choices. (I can do the Hollywood/video game bullshit dual wield Desert Eagle comfortably for example.....my accuracy isn't the best, but I can do it.)

 

That being said, let's get onto why the P-10C.

 

First off, going to have to disagree with Sturgeon on the trigger, anyone who's paid attention to my posts here knows I have annoyingly high standards of triggers and sights and, normally when it comes to triggers on striker fired guns, assuming we're not referring to after market mods, the P-10C is pretty much the first trigger on a striker fired Glock style tongue safety trigger that I find noticeably better, from the pull weight to the reset to travel distance, It's just a very clean trigger for a striker fired gun, and, for reference, for other striker fired polymer guns to compare to a Glock, I've tried heavily or owned:

 

Walther PPQ M2 (I'd rate the trigger as slightly better but not massively, at least not by the margin the P-10C is.)

S&W M&P (Haven't got to use many of the newer 2.0 models which have a different trigger setup, but the 1.0 triggers are horrid and this was almost the single biggest turning point on why I never bought one over a Glock.)

SIG P320 (Owned one before it was cool, overall worse trigger bar none, that wasn't the only reason I traded it in though.)

H&K VP9 (Yet another case of H&K fanboys overhyping the shit out of anything with 2 red letters on it, touted as the greatest thing to happen to striker fired guns ever, is not noticeably better than a Glock in any way aside from some arguable minor ergonomic changes despite costing more.)

FN USA FNS (about the same, nothing special but not a bad alternative by any means, haven't tried the newer 509. On an unrelated note, I'd still recommend a Glock because FNH/FN USA charge fucking murder for new magazines and other gear.)

STEEEEER M9-A1 (The *other* Austrian Striker fired polymer framed handgun, these are really nice actually and a steal for the price, better sights and great ergos for sure, as for the trigger I feel they're about even.)

Canik....anything (LOL, seriously, trigger issues are only the beginning, don't buy anything from them, their shit is horrid and all their good reviews were from already anti Glock fanboys who were paid off in gun mags basically.)

 

There's probably more I'm forgetting or simply don't want to bother talking about, but you get the Idea.

 

Second is the front cocking serrations, this doesn't need me to go into much, It's a roughly G19 length slide and I have gorilla hands so that's really useful to me, It's also a very simple thing to do.

 

The grip angle and the grip shape, along with the space in general I have for my hand from below the slide to the very bottom of the grip just fits me quite a bit better for my freakishly large hands, the P-10C also has a slightly roomier trigger guard which is good for when it's fucking cold out and I'm wearing gloves.

 

Lastly, they have an MSRP of only $500, making them an absolute steal, street price is lower obviously, but, you won't have a chance to get one if you see it for long because they're going fast right now.

 

Originally, I would've recommended the Steyr M9-A1 or L9-A1 series as "the Polymer framed, Striker fired pistol with no manual safety you should get if you absolutely hate Glock for no real reason at all.", the P-10C moved the other Austrian offering down to 2nd however (the M9-A1 series has better sights however, though pretty much all stock sights on pistols and rifles alike are dogshit and should be the first thing you change.). they're also going to be offering a 12 shot .40 S&W version at some point indicated by the owners manual to try and grab at the balls of the G23 market, so look forward to that. you said you're interested in 2 gun, in USPSA/IPSC, Open Major division has a 10mm minimum caliber requirement so guns for this bracket are pretty much always chambered in .40 S&W as said cartridge is literally just a 10mm Auto casing cut down by 3mm and set to a lower approved pressure rating.

 

.....Though to be fair, if you ever get really serious into IPSC, chances are you won't be using a striker fired, polymer framed gun.

 

 

15 hours ago, xthetenth said:

Yep. Plus, I'm trying to get it together before a 2-gun match at the start of February so things like waiting on custom holsters and stuff isn't happening. Instead, I got a holster that was in stock, mags that were on sale, and so on and so forth.

 

In the land of the universally competent pistol, the broad ecosystem is king.

 

You know, I know it's a really arrogant thing to say but, assume they actually participate in the event and don't just host it, I legit think I can beat Ian and Karl in a 2 gun match.

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31 minutes ago, Khand-e said:

 

You know, I know it's a really arrogant thing to say but, assume they actually participate in the event and don't just host it, I legit think I can beat Ian and Karl in a 2 gun match.

 

Do it. They're participating in that event (They're in squad one), and (disclaimer) I think their events are really cool and want them to succeed (end disclaimer). As a heads up, they are both running Classic division. If you'd like, I can ask what they'll be running again since I don't remember it off the top of my head. I'm going to be in their squad. Considering my firearms experience consists of a few hours on the twelfth, I'm probably going to do terribly.

 

Plus, believe me, Karl gets much worse than "I legit think I can beat them". I think the ones that really bug him are the armchair commandos that talk shit without being willing to put their skills on the line. Hell, he'll be the first one to admit he's not shooting as well with the time he puts into IRTV and not focusing on a single gun the way some of the other dudes can.

 

I'm probably not going to get into IPSC, the matches that Ian and Karl run are more what's got my interest.

 

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