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The Swedish AFV Thread: Not Just Strv 103s


LostCosmonaut
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I have a somewhat unhealthy obsession with Swedish armored fighting vehicles (although my disease is not quite as bad as T___A's attraction to communist frying pans and the like). By far the most well known Swedish AFV is the Strv 103, one of the more unusual MBT designs from the Cold War.

 

strv103c.jpg

 

However, there are also numerous other Swedish armored vehicle designs that I find interesting. Such as the Kranvagn, and the Strv 74.

 

Strv_74_at_AAF_Museum.jpg

 

If you are interested in learning more about Swedish AFVs, I would highly recommend consulting this excellent site. Be warned, most of the documents therein are in Swedish, so at least have google translate open in another tab.

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I think that a turretless tank would be highly unsuitable for the types of operations the Soviets would have undertaken during the Cold War. However, given Sweden's unique set of requirements, and that the Strv 103 would fight in a purely defensive war, I can see how it would be a logical design.

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I think that a turretless tank would be highly unsuitable for the types of operations the Soviets would have undertaken during the Cold War. However, given Sweden's unique set of requirements, and that the Strv 103 would fight in a purely defensive war, I can see how it would be a logical design.

 

The Soviets thought turretless tanks weren't even good for that as in their opinion turning the tank to move the gun would reveal the tank's postion.

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IKV 91 is rather tall IMO.

 

STRV-2000 is hilarious; that 140mm cannon was utterly nuts, and the Russians are eternal poor sports for quitting the Cold War so it didn't have anything that needed shot at with a gun that gigantic.

 

Big gun = best gun

 

There's always a reason for big gun.

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IKV 91 is rather tall IMO.

The IKV 91 is shorter than Sheridan and only .02 m taller than the AMX-13 and Type 62. The PT-76 is about .1 m shorter and the FV101 is .2 m shorter. 

 

The IKV 91 is significantly longer than its contemporaries.I'm pretty sure it's 2 meters longer than all other light tanks of the period. The FV101 is tiny BTW and has the lowest ground pressure by a large margin. 

 

I made a table of light tank characteristics circa 1975. I'm probably off on some of the numbers so don't be surprised by some off info.

gN0J3mA.jpg

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To discuss a more modern Swedish AFV, the CV90120-T. Will it find a viable user? It would seem that it a very marketable vehicle among NATO and allied countries that would like to have an airliftable 120 mm gun platform. Russia has the 2S25 and China has the ZTQ which are roughly equivalent in role.

 

The CV90120T needs to be on one of those match-making reality shows.

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To discuss a more modern Swedish AFV, the CV90120-T. Will it find a viable user? It would seem that it a very marketable vehicle among NATO and allied countries that would like to have an airliftable 120 mm gun platform. Russia has the 2S25 and China has the ZTQ which are roughly equivalent in role.

 

The CV90120T needs to be on one of those match-making reality shows.

 

In all fairness, while the Type-62G variant is a really badass light tank, their production (aswell as the entire ZTQ-62 line) has been retired for nearly 2 years now and plans for what will be done with the remaining vehicles is still up in the air. So it might be out of this race before it even begins.

 

There is a new "light" variant of the Type-99A2 family that's been spotted a few times though, though little is really known about it, let alone whether or not it will be offered for export.

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Per Tanknet, S-tank got new APFSDS, but it wasn't as potent as the APFDS used in their centurions at around the same time because the autoloader couldn't handle the longer rounds.

 

S-tank looks hard to upgun:

 

20070524_468.jpg

 

There's basically no air around the gun (It's more or less built into the glacis), so it's hard to put a bigger gun in.  There's also no space around the magazine, so any proposed bigger gun would be firing ammo with the same OAL to 105mm.  And as per the anecdote above, it was already restricted to stubby 105mm ammo already.

 

You could probably fit a longer-barreled version of the 110mm; at least the earlier ones with one-piece ammo.  The RO roided-up L7 with higher pressure ammo might work too, assuming that the AL is gentle enough it doesn't mangle the combustible case rounds.  Neither of those is really drastically more capable than the L7 itself is though; certainly both fall short of the mighty fury of the Rheinmetall 120mm smoothbore.

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