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Post Election Thread: Democracy Dies In Darkness And You Can Help

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1 hour ago, Scolopax said:

 

Game over for the accusers. 

 

Now the thing is, if they had just stuck to the original story that Judge Roy courted high school teenagers in the 1970s, I believe the claims would have stuck because he actually kind of sort-of admitted to doing just that when interviewed by Sean Hannity.

 

But that wasn't good enough, so they had to make the story better by claiming that he was kicked out of a mall for stalking little girls (he wasn't, multiple witnesses including the mall manager don't recall that happening), that police protection was needed to keep him from perving on the high school cheerleading squad (it didn't happen, the only witness was a woman with an axe to grind because Judge Roy helped put away her drug peddling brother), and now this yearbook signature which is a forgery.

 

When you have a story this explosive, the truth is the best weapon. 

 

After this election, if I were Roy Moore, I'd sue the Washington Post, Gloria Allred and her client for libel and slander. 

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2 hours ago, Donward said:

 

Game over for the accusers. 

 

Now the thing is, if they had just stuck to the original story that Judge Roy courted high school teenagers in the 1970s, I believe the claims would have stuck because he actually kind of sort-of admitted to doing just that when interviewed by Sean Hannity.

 

But that wasn't good enough, so they had to make the story better by claiming that he was kicked out of a mall for stalking little girls (he wasn't, multiple witnesses including the mall manager don't recall that happening), that police protection was needed to keep him from perving on the high school cheerleading squad (it didn't happen, the only witness was a woman with an axe to grind because Judge Roy helped put away her drug peddling brother), and now this yearbook signature which is a forgery.

 

When you have a story this explosive, the truth is the best weapon. 

 

After this election, if I were Roy Moore, I'd sue the Washington Post, Gloria Allred and her client for libel and slander. 

This is also why we have Teflon Don'. He's got plenty of reasons for people to call him an ass, but then they pile all this crap onto the accusations and when they're called out for their bull it all gets wiped off the table

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4 hours ago, Scolopax said:

To follow up on this, I'm seeing that her alterations were just adding the date, not the entire comment.  So far as when know at least.

 

Screen_Shot_2017-12-08_at_10_46_15_AM.pn

 

Regardless, the headlines of this aren't putting the accusers and the left in a good position.

 

 

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10 minutes ago, Scolopax said:

To follow up on this, I'm seeing that her alterations were just adding the date, not the entire comment.  So far as when know at least.

 

Screen_Shot_2017-12-08_at_10_46_15_AM.pn

 

Regardless, the headlines of this aren't putting the accusers and the left in a good position.

 

 

 

 

She's poison now, who knows what was original, or if this is just spin or whatever, what we do know is she lied in the beginning so why trust her now. Maybe the check from the DNC bounced or something, I hear they are having a really hard time raising money, unlike the RNC, they are raking in the cash... 

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22 minutes ago, Scolopax said:

To follow up on this, I'm seeing that her alterations were just adding the date, not the entire comment.  So far as when know at least.

 

Screen_Shot_2017-12-08_at_10_46_15_AM.pn

 

Regardless, the headlines of this aren't putting the accusers and the left in a good position.

 

 

The D.A. is obviously different handwriting as well. 

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So, the ATF has regulations regarding what all can and cannot be done to serial numbers. One such thing is that you cannot even re-engrave a worn or faint serial number because that introduces uncertainty about what the original was. I would imagine that this same kind of logic is being applied to this situation: the original has been modified, so the whole thing is in question now. That, and all the other accusations have fallen flat on their face.

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The Democrats have released their public playbook as to what Congressional Districts they hope to contest in 2018; expanding the number from 80 to 91

 

https://dccc.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/20171109_year-out-memo.pdf

 

This is typical inside baseball stuff. Glancing at this, however, the Dems seem overly optimistic as some of their targets include House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin and Peter King of New York.

 

In terms of my home state, I gave a mirthless chuckle when I saw they are targeting Eastern Washington's Cathy Rodgers who is in as safe a Republican district as you can get and the only way she'll lose is if someone to the right of her politically primaries her. And they're also going after WA-08 again after it is being vacated by my old boss. Democrats have spent millions of dollars trying to pick up this seat over the years and keep falling on their face and it's going to be won by Republican Dino Rossi who is still well liked by local GOPers after being robbed of the gubernatorial election in 2004.

 

Bigger picture it seems the Democrats are misreading the poll numbers again. Yeah, Americans aren't happy with the job Congress is doing but this has been the case for decades. And the mistake is being made that somehow this dislike of Congress is a monolithic and are conflating dislike of Speaker Paul Ryan with a dislike of Trump. As we have seen, American politics has splintered into a variety different factions with a new game of musical chairs as to which group sits where.

 

The Democrats are also overly optimistic about the generic polling advantage they have which is generally always the case. But Congressional seats aren't won by a generic, nationwide ballot and instead in a myriad of 435 individual, local races. 

 

And it also ignores whatever legislation that Trump and the GOP will be able to ram through over the next year; it'll probably be enough to patch over differences in the GOP base.

 

But here is Politico's starry-eyed reporting on the subject. I guess the thought is that since the Democrats won a couple elections in the Democrat stronghold of New Jersey and the DC Swamp of Virginia that a Blue Wave is coming. 

 

Sad!

 

https://www.politico.com/story/2017/12/08/democrats-election-long-shot-districts-287916

 

 

 

 

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4 minutes ago, Sturgeon said:

I can't wait for them to try that on Trump again in 2020 on the basis of the Alabama result, and have him crush them anyway.

 

Given his current approval ratings, what makes you think Trump will be the GOP candidate in 2020?

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5 minutes ago, Walter_Sobchak said:

 

Given his current approval ratings, what makes you think Trump will be the GOP candidate in 2020?

 

He'll just bully the Republican Party into giving him the nomination, regardless of any other facts or people in his way.  You know, exactly what he did in 2016.

 

And I'll probably laugh, just like I did back then.

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A few take aways.

 

If this election were held again tomorrow, Roy moore wins by ten percent. And that's because I think enough Republicans decided to stay pure-and-holy by not voting for him because they assumed The Judge was ahead by five or ten points - per the last polls - and therefore they didn't need to dirty their dainty paws.

 

The polling again this cycle sucked. And that's because we all know that political polls are simply conducted in order to pressure public opinion, not reflect it.

 

Bannon and Company just need to fucking go away. If the guy were a Clinton Democrat, he'd have already been found on a DC park bench having committed suicide by shooting himself in the back of the head twice.

 

Trump still knows his stuff politically. Wait, whatchu say? Isn't this election a repudiation of Trump? No, not really. Remember that Trump endorsed Luther Strange in the Republican Primary. And this confused a lot of hardcore Trump supporters since Strange was one of those rascally, mcconnell-backed, swamp, Republican Establishment types. And he might have been. But Strange would have won Alabama with 60 percent of the vote. Assuming an incriminating yearbook signature and 40 year old rape allegations didn't mysteriously pop out of the blue against Strange.

 

Which brings up another point that Trump probably knew is that moore has historically underperformed in statewide races by orders of magnitude. Like barely pulling in 51 percent of the statewide vote as I saw in one infographic in his Supreme Court race. 

 

If I were Trump, I'd put out a shitpoast Tweet tomorrow - when the vote tally confirms there's no possible way for moore to comeback - saying "See? I told Alabama Republicans to pick Luther Strange and you didn't listen. Sad!"

 

This race is going to be portrayed as a rebuke to Donald Trump by the media and Democrats and #NeverTrump Republicans (no shit, right?) but it took a remarkable series of events to occur. Rape of underage girls. That was a bridge too far, especially when enough GOP politicians and pundits were quick to jump on the bandwagon saying they believed those allegations. I don't see that strategy working again too many times (unless the allegations are true, granted). 

 

Doug Jones is only going to be Senator for two years and will probably lose re-election in 2020. 

 

This needs to be the wake up call needed for Republicans to get their shit together and start passing some bills that are low hanging fruit. Continuing to dismantle ObamaCare, passing some pro-2nd Amendment bills, immigration reform, etc. The meat-and-potatoes GOP platform positions that Congressmen and Senators can go back to the voters and say "See, I did good". 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Donward said:

 

This needs to be the wake up call needed for Republicans to get their shit together and start passing some bills that are low hanging fruit. Continuing to dismantle ObamaCare, passing some pro-2nd Amendment bills, immigration reform, etc. The meat-and-potatoes GOP platform positions that Congressmen and Senators can go back to the voters and say "See, I did good". 

 

Yeah, I sincerely hope this is a thorn in the foot of the elephant, so to speak.

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50 minutes ago, Walter_Sobchak said:

 

Given his current approval ratings, what makes you think Trump will be the GOP candidate in 2020?

 

The last time a president was dumped from the ticket by his party was 1856. The bully pulpit is simply too strong to give up no matter how bad the candidate.

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1 hour ago, Walter_Sobchak said:

 

Given his current approval ratings, what makes you think Trump will be the GOP candidate in 2020?

Which GOP candidate is going to unseat him in the primary?

 

Jeff Flake of Arizona?

Benjamin Sasse of Nebraska?

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