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The Small Arms Thread, Part 8: 2018; ICSR to be replaced by US Army with interim 15mm Revolver Cannon.


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I want to like Larry Vickers, but he needs to get his cameraman off of coke, and get himself some pronunciation coaching.

 

The FG-42 probably suffered the most from being hard to get a hold of. You couldn't really got analysis beyond a few people who fired them and what specs could be relayed. Everything else was just more reactionary response due to limited info. I'm sure it wasn't the future-is-now weapon some make it out to be, but it was a solid concept with some impressive tech for the time. I'm especially interested in how switching from semi to auto reconfigures it to open bolt.

 

The Smithsonian Channel has this neat show called The Weapon Hunter. If I remember, he went into pretty decent detail about the FG-42, and even got camera time with rare items like those flare guns that the Fallschirm converted into grenade launchers. He definitely seems worth a watch, as I've seen quite a few episodes and not heard one ridiculous myth out of his mouth (funny that's a genuine pro to a show, but there we are). I was surprised how well the guy knew his stuff. Hell, I was just amazed that he dubbed the PaK 40 as the biggest danger to Allied tanks, instead of Tigers or 88s. There was even an episode that showed him going around for parts to fix up an old M10.

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Let's all take a trip back to the late 1970s and early 1980s.  This was the time of punk.  This was the time of despair.   Punk was all about minimalism; strip everything down to a few chords, wear

Stechkin's Abakan (TKB-0146). https://www.kalashnikov.ru/abakan-stechkina-avtomat-stechkina-tkb-0146/        Bullpup, system of "recoil impulse shifted in time", 2-stage

So what, my 5.56 rounds are groundbreaking too if I shoot the dirt.

Our resident Germanophile will be happy to hear this; I may be beginning to come around regarding the FG-42. I was originally pretty skeptical about claims of its mild recoil, but the more I look into it, the more I think its secret sauce might actually work.

It's certainly got a lot of neat little engineering features to it, and I think I seriously wonder about how durable those new reproductions are (the originals are supposed to be pretty fragile and breaky, but given the Germans' situation at the time, I wonder how much of that was pushing a design too far, and how much was limited design time in addition to lackluster metallurgy).

As I mentioned in my latest Light Rifle article, I am about 99% convinced that the FG-42 was the "light at the end of the tunnel" for the US Lightweight Rifle program, and the original reason they so tenaciously pursued a full-caliber select-fire infantry rifle. This obviously leads to the question "why didn't they just clone it for the rifle program, like they did for the machine gun program?"

 

Finally, check out how friggin' tiny the First Model is:

Absolutely off the hook.

How much of this was due to German designers being very aggressive and forward-thinking, versus American designers (with one or two glaring exceptions) being sort of conservative and production-minded? A lot of the shitty compromises you described in your article were about maintaining existing plant/tooling/ancillary stock rather than being the result of shitty design.

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I want to like Larry Vickers, but he needs to get his cameraman off of coke, and get himself some pronunciation coaching.

 

The FG-42 probably suffered the most from being hard to get a hold of. You couldn't really got analysis beyond a few people who fired them and what specs could be relayed. Everything else was just more reactionary response due to limited info. I'm sure it wasn't the future-is-now weapon some make it out to be, but it was a solid concept with some impressive tech for the time. I'm especially interested in how switching from semi to auto reconfigures it to open bolt.

 

The Smithsonian Channel has this neat show called The Weapon Hunter. If I remember, he went into pretty decent detail about the FG-42, and even got camera time with rare items like those flare guns that the Fallschirm converted into grenade launchers. He definitely seems worth a watch, as I've seen quite a few episodes and not heard one ridiculous myth out of his mouth (funny that's a genuine pro to a show, but there we are). I was surprised how well the guy knew his stuff. Hell, I was just amazed that he dubbed the PaK 40 as the biggest danger to Allied tanks, instead of Tigers or 88s. There was even an episode that showed him going around for parts to fix up an old M10.

 

Provided these are on Youtube, you sir just bleed some of my spare time like a stuck pig

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Alex Capps quickly became the founding member and lead prophet of the Cult of The Stripper Clip, which - despite several hundred years of initial persecution by the pagan Garand Empire - became the leading small arms religion in the world.

The Stripper Clip would be a great name for a gun oriented strip... er I mean... "Gentleman's Club".

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Alex Capps quickly became the founding member and lead prophet of the Cult of The Stripper Clip, which - despite several hundred years of initial persecution by the pagan Garand Empire - became the leading small arms religion in the world.

 

HOW WILL YOU HAVE HIGH CAPACITY WITHOUT EN-BLOC CLIPS, HUH?

hk36mag.jpg

 

(this rifle is so goofy, I love it to death)

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So, this is pretty funny.  I wonder if parts will interchange with the original Grendel P10/P12?

 

According to reliable sources the S&W bodyguard auto is also based on the Kel-Tec, sharing the distinctive tension hammer spring (which the diagram above shows the Grendel did not have; it looks like it had a Tokarev-style clock spring inside the hammer).

 

P-3AT%20Parts.JPG

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Where is your Striker fired, polymer framed Messiah now

 

Rise in accidental gunshots by L.A. County deputies follows new firearm

 

In 2012, there were 12 accidental discharges, none involving the M&P. In 2013, there were 18, eight of which were M&Ps. Of the 30 incidents in 2014, 22 involved M&Ps.

 

Per CNN

 

Guns used by LA deputies put officers, public at risk, report says

 

The department went to the new gun, in part, because it is easier to handle and easier to shoot accurately, particularly for people with small hands.

 

Small hands.

 

Small hands.

 

Small hands.

 

Small hands.

 

It is the people with "small hands" that have ruined today's shooting industry.

 

Gotta go and get ready for Mech's application of a beer bottle.

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      There are many who feel that the 5.56 NATO is a superlative rifle round. Much has been said about larger alternatives to 5.56, such as various 6.5mm and 6.8mm rounds among others. Less has been said about smaller rounds. Off the top of my head, I can recall that there was a German 4.6x36mm round, used in the HK36, and the British 4.85x49mm round. Neither of these rounds managed to gain widespread acceptance. My knowledge of the voodoo that is ballistics is somewhat limited, so I'm uncertain as to whether these failures were caused by flaws with the rounds themselves, or because they were below some lower limit of effective bullet size, beyond which performance decreases rapidly. Could we see a resurgence of these concepts in the future, or do they represent an evolutionary dead-end?

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