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Land 400 Phase 3: Australian IFV


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11 hours ago, DIADES said:

Rubber band needs to be replaced completely and I don't see carrying a whole spare track as practical.  
 

But will be a liability in real operations.


Your first point is no longer correct. Here are some pics I took at AUSA 2019 of the CRT repair kit:
 

uNrSAER.jpg


SbBcMvP.jpg

 

169Uxna.jpg

 

Regarding your second point, Canadian “TLAVs” (M113) in Afghanistan seemed to find CRT robust & practical enough, as do multiple users of the BV210 & Warthog. 

 

ATDU trialled CRT in 2018 on Warrior and had overwhelmingly positive results. Some of you concerns & considerations re. CRT, whilst once potentially valid, appear to have been overtaken by developments and aren’t supported by evidence. 

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8 hours ago, 2805662 said:

aren’t supported by evidence.

OK, yes rubber bands work on very light vehicles.  Please show me any evidence of a medium or heavy AFY on rubber track?

 

And - the repair is not apples and apples.  The rubber band repair does not return the track to fully functional - speed degraded and vibration increased - it is purely an expedient repair prior to replacement.

 

A repaired in the field conventional track is fully functional.  There is no comparison.

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20 hours ago, 2805662 said:

It’s unlikely that any conventional track could either, surely?

 

It can happen, it depends on a lot of factors. But repairing conventional and light-weight steel tracks is easier.

 

Both Sourcy CRTs and steel tracks can also be damaged by smaller blasts. But the type of damage is rather different and means for (quick) repair are usually carried inside/on the vehicle in case for steel tracks.

 

17 hours ago, Laser Shark said:

The Battle Damage Repair Kit at least offers a temporary fix until you can get back to base. Extra tracks will of course have to be brought along with the unit's logistics train. If you have to bring up a replacement track to an immobilized vehicle, however, it probably won’t be too much of an issue either since you have this thing:

 

It's a solution, but also an afterthought. The vehicle will be able to limp back to base for proper repairs. That's not necessary with steel tracks allowing a proper repair in field.

 

Personally I'd prefer the segmented rubber tracks from DST. They combine the strengths of CRTs (claimed weight reduction of 50% compared to conventional steel tracks) with the segmented construction of steel tracks. Though I suspect given that they are still composite-rubber tracks, their overall lifetime will also be significantly worse than that of lightweight/conventional steel tracks.

 

The US Army tested Soucy's band tracks and DST Type 513 steel tracks on the M113. Soucy's tracks lasted 4,700 kilometers, the Type 513 tracks were still not worn out after the trials were stopped after 6,000 kilometers of travel. DST claims a lifetime of up to 14,000 kilometers for the Type 513 tracks.

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1 hour ago, DIADES said:

OK, yes rubber bands work on very light vehicles.  Please show me any evidence of a medium or heavy AFY on rubber track?

 

And - the repair is not apples and apples.  The rubber band repair does not return the track to fully functional - speed degraded and vibration increased - it is purely an expedient repair prior to replacement.

 

A repaired in the field conventional track is fully functional.  There is no comparison.

Do they state it is degraded in vibration or speed.   I'm not saying it isn't, but Im not assuming it is either, simply because induatrial belting splice kits can be rated for the same speed the application is used for even if it less than the theoretical maximum.

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11 hours ago, SH_MM said:

Personally I'd prefer the segmented rubber tracks from DST. They combine the strengths of CRTs (claimed weight reduction of 50% compared to conventional steel tracks) with the segmented construction of steel tracks. Though I suspect given that they are still composite-rubber tracks, their overall lifetime will also be significantly worse than that of lightweight/conventional steel tracks.

 

As long as the durability isn’t unacceptably bad, I think the benefits of rubber band tracks, particularly when it comes to environment, health and safety (aka “HMS” In Norway), will ultimately convince most Western militaries to adopt them sooner or later. I agree, though, that a segmented solution would be another step in the right direction.

 

11 hours ago, DIADES said:

OK, yes rubber bands work on very light vehicles.  Please show me any evidence of a medium or heavy AFY on rubber track?

 

One example:

 

boR8l6t.jpg

 

Norwegian CV9030NF1 in Northern Afghanistan. These vehicles had also been outfitted with AMAP add-on-armour by that time, so they probably weighed around 30 tonnes. The positive experiences with rubber band tracks in Afghanistan, contributed to the decision to outfit the entire fleet of 144 new and upgraded vehicles (CV9030 MkIIIb and CV90RWS) with this type of tracks.

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https://www.jlv.com.au/cable-belt-conveyors.html

The soucy patch reminds me of cable belt conveyors.  Not the cheapest solution but they are the long distance champioms of conveyors.  31km between drives is possobly not even physically possible with a segmented steel solution with shear connections.

 

Point is, rubber tracks are technology with lots of development potential.  With an end point generally superior to metal tracks with rubber pads.

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5 hours ago, DIADES said:

Definitely getting up there :).  Still another 15t or 50% to go to get to Ph3 weight class - no, I do not believe Hanwha (or Rheinmetall) weights.

 

Yes, and the TU article I posted earlier in this thread claims they’re already snapping more frequently than they should on a vehicle that is just 5 tonnes heavier than the CV9030NF1, so there is definitely reason to be sceptical. Granted, it’s also possible that the Norwegian tracks were ones that were ordered years ago, and as such, might not give the correct impression of how durable those on the Redback are. So, one shouldn’t approach this without an open mind either.

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9 hours ago, DIADES said:

Agreed.  My point is that we are not there yet.  And that is what we are talking about.   Now, well, the next 12 months roughly when the evaluation takes place.  That will use existing technology.

Agree about using existing technology for the evaluation, but pointing out for future growth, this tech's progression is open ended not closed ended.

 

Also, has reservations that a cold country track maker will choose the right compound for a hot country

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30 minutes ago, Kal said:

The 2 are not mutually incompatible,  added boost to achieve required power rating combined with new emissions verifications is probably sufficient to consider it a new engine, even if it is 95%+ common by parts

 

I did not say that they are mutually incompatible, but I mentioned the D976 engine already last Friday... which at least makes me wonder, why you post about it with the words "New D976 18 litre, 6cyl ".

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32 minutes ago, SH_MM said:

 

I did not say that they are mutually incompatible, but I mentioned the D976 engine already last Friday... which at least makes me wonder, why you post about it with the words "New D976 18 litre, 6cyl ".

Because in my country the link to that engine has the word NEW appended in the top corner, unlike most of liebherr's other engine links.  But there are plenty of times when whats new for Australia is old for the rest of the world....

 

I dont know if D976 is a new 18l engine, or just a new edition of an old 18l engine.  Just that liebherr is labeling it as 'new'.

 

I do appreciate your friday posts, I'll need to update my lynx vs as21 spreadsheet with the 6cyl engine..

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